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Author Topic: What does "point of contention" mean  (Read 6635 times)
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able
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« on: October 05, 2009, 12:02:35 PM »

  I'm writting a paper on skateboarding's fashion faux pas in the nineties. I think I know what it means, but I can't find a defintion of the phrase of the internet.


Thanks for any help.
even a vague definition would be helpful...
« Last Edit: October 05, 2009, 09:51:11 PM by able » Logged
ScreamingHand
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2009, 01:14:52 PM »

a time or place when one is content.?
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Sleazy
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« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2009, 01:21:36 PM »

a point of dissagreement

health care is a point of contention between the republicans and democrats
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« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2009, 09:52:32 PM »

Thanks Sleazy! That really helps! I'll delete this thread tomorrow after I'm done with my paper.
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« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2009, 06:20:29 AM »

good luck
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clarkie
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« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2009, 04:06:54 PM »

  I'm writting a paper on skateboarding's fashion faux pas in the nineties. I think I know what it means, but I can't find a defintion of the phrase of the internet.


Thanks for any help.
even a vague definition would be helpful...


Faux pas means not socially accepted, not the norm, not cool etc. You might find it in a thesaurus. Do we get to read the paper?
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« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2009, 05:51:23 PM »

It's terrible but here goes...  Embarrassed

Skater Punks

Skateboarding’s Fashion ‘Faux Pas’ of the Early Nineties

            It was the summer of 93’ and my high school friends and I donned the garments of skateboarder punks. At the time, Skateboarders were in seek of their own personal identity and would buy clothing many sizes too big. It was a snub at the status quo and a way show our unity with the subculture. It however, became a great source or ridicule from other students, parents, as well as a point of contention in the eyes of authority.

            Just like any other Friday in 1993, I spent my evening walking through the aisles of the work and utility department at the local Wal-Mart. I was in pursuit of the freshest pair of Dickies. They were the brand of choice in the skateboarding community at the time. They were dark blue jeans with white triple stitching that came complete with tool pockets and a hammer loop. They were the cream of the crop in skateboarding fashion. I was a size 30 waist but would buy nothing smaller than a size 42. With glee, I would bring home my newest pair, cut the legs to the desired length, and then I’d either hem the waist, or bunch them up with my braided belt.

        Skateboarders were a small minority in the early nineties. It was after boom of the late 80’s and before its eventual resurgence of popularity in 2000. The sport was deemed to be a fad then, and I was often asked “you still skateboard?” as oddly as if I was using a rotary phone today. “Yes, I do!” I would reply proudly, while dragging my beat up skateboard down the hall and dangling my two foot long chain from my wallet. Yes, the chain wallet too, was a source of expression in skateboarding back then. We were a small social clique at my school. Out of as many as 1200 students we were a group of 15. Not only were we scrutinized for our taste in sports, we were clowned on (no pun intended) for our over sized garments. They were dubbed as “bellbottoms” by the majority of the rabble-rousers, and we grew used to hearing the sound “Ding, Ding!” as we walked the hallways.   

        Upon reading Susanna Schrobsdorff’s article entitled “Bum Rap,” I was reminded of similar objections by adults and school faculty about my style of clothing. In “Bum Rap,” Schorobsdorff wrote about a new trend in student fashion where young women would have the names of their boyfriends plastered upon their clothing’s behind. Although our stories are considerably different, the tale of youth’s self expression, combined with criticism from elders, seemed all too familiar. Schorobsdorff says that in response to the current trend, schools across America had been “rolling out an increasingly strict array of dress codes.” This was similar to my story where chain wallets were not only prohibited to be a certain length in schools; they were reasons for dismissal at music concerts. Another familiarity between my story and Schrobsdorff’s, was the uneasiness our styles caused parents. While in Schrobsdorff’s article, parents were worried about the safety and their daughters and the bad message the clothing sent. My father thought that wearing a backward hat and chain wallet signified and allegiance to a gang.

 Also covered in Schrobsdorff’s peice, was the evolution of the fashion into the mainstream. The article spoke of a company called “JUICY” that started the trend of putting their name on the backside of women’s pants. Once the trend caught on it was reproduced by much larger companies that were looking for their own “piece of the pie.” A similar thing happened with skateboarding’s fashion. Our gaudy taste had actually infected the mainstream. Companies like JNCO, Levis and even The Gap started marketing their own brand of baggy utility jeans. “They want 55 Dollars for a pair of those!” My friends and I would scoff. We knew that a pair of Dickies only costs us 18 bucks. It wasn’t long before everyone at our high school was wearing the same terrible clothes we were wearing, and we had quickly lost our proud identities as outsiders. Sadly, It was back to the drawing board for us.

          There is only one thing certain when it comes to fashion. Styles will come and go. Perhaps the best advice I can give parents who are worried about their daughters is this; adopt your child’s style as your own. Nothing will kill a style faster than people seeing people who are deemed “unhip” wearing it. For this, I owe a great deal of gratitude for the many of non-skateboarders in my high school who stole our style. Thank you for saving me the extra years of embarrassment. Also, if I should be so lucky as to run into any of you today; I have two words for you, “Ding! Ding!”

Work Cited:
Schrobsdorff, Susanna. “Bum Rap.” Newsweek.com.
5 Sep. 2008. Web. 5 Oct. 2009
 
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trafficjam
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« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2009, 07:55:02 PM »

good read able! the end made me laugh. i still dont really know, what exactly is a braided belt?
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« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2009, 10:52:28 AM »

One of the worst things to ever hit the 'belt market.'
http://www.spudart.org/blogs/randomthoughts_comments/A4639_0_3_0_C/
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Jura
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« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2009, 03:59:16 PM »

Braided belts + stretch were the just bees knees back then.

Fantastic!
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« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2009, 08:10:56 AM »

Braided belts + stretch were the just bees knees back then.
Fantastic!

they'll be back.
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« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2009, 11:44:47 PM »

Right on, I like it - Thanks!
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