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Help!!! => HELP => Topic started by: loophole on August 26, 2009, 02:11:54 PM

Title: student loans?
Post by: loophole on August 26, 2009, 02:11:54 PM
they kill.
what loan are you on/recommend? got tips and hints?
i could really use a little advice, i'm flying blind
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: anblue on August 26, 2009, 02:22:52 PM
i actually wont need student loans which im really happy about but i am about to be on some car loan shit which im kinda bummed on
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: TapLuxiferfet on August 26, 2009, 02:28:04 PM
Can't help you dude, my tutition was waived. Maybe find one with the best interest? Good luck.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: crailtapper on August 26, 2009, 02:29:04 PM
i actually wont need student loans which im really happy about but i am about to be on some car loan shit which im kinda bummed on

i don't know shit when it comes to student loans, but my girlfriend said that she used a car loan to pay for school because the interest was WAY lower.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: RightCoastBiased on August 26, 2009, 02:36:56 PM
The whole student loan process sucks. I just went through it and then decided I could do better things with my money. You need to start off by doing your FASFA. This is what everything is based off of. FASFA will explain how much the government thinks you can pay. You'll need your tax info form last year and/or your parents if you are under 21. Or if you were claimed as a dependent in the 2008 tax year. After that you'll need to contact your school and let them know you did the FASFA. Then the school will tell you how much money, if any, they are going to grant you. From there your school should have a list of suggested borrowers to choose form. Once you choose your lender you will need to sign (you can "e-sign) your Masters Promissory Note (MPN). The process of signing this explains all your borrowers rights, interest rates on subsidized and unsubsidized loans. They will also tell you what the difference between these loans is. Everything you will need to know will be available while signing the MPN. You will also have to answer questions at the end of each page to continue to the next. Then the loan info goes to your school and a letter will arrive at your house in a week or so explaining how much money the lender you choose if giving you.


Good fucking luck because it sucks. I had to do this whole thing pretty much all on my own. Best of luck.

Also, the financial aid office at your school is there to assist you. Bug them as much as you have to, because that is there job. The women I dealt with at the school I was applying for were very unhelpful. So don't be surprised if you run into people like that and don't let it put you off. Just make sure you get your question answered. Also go in there if you want some paper copies of the info about loans and federal stafford loans (which is the loan I was speaking of above and is where you start out, form there you get other student loans).
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on August 26, 2009, 02:39:33 PM
- stay with the ones with subsidized interest while in school
- only borrow if you have a plan that results in you graduating and getting a job that pays more than what you are going to borrow. it's silly to borrow 80 and get out and make 30.
- they will fuck you, for real. keep every piece of paperwork you get and never trust anyone on the phone. anytime you get told something on the phone that will screw you if it's not true, write down the persons name and what was said and maybe even double check what they are saying your contract. anytime they ask you to provide anything, always confirm that they got it and take down the name and date. i got completely fucked on mine, they claimed i didn't send in paperwork that needed to be sent and i sent it from my school financial aid department with the help of a lady that knew me and who said she'd testify for me and they still said "fuck you and by the way that's 11k in fees." it took me 8 years to resolve it and my credit was fucked the whole time. also, my sister paid one back but didn't keep her paperwork, they said she never paid and then she ended up having to pay again. these people can be real pricks and they get a level of protection that is pretty rediculous and they will take advantage of that to screw you. you have no way out, not even bankruptcy so just respect the level of power that that gives these assholes. you can't even find lawyers who will take your case because it's unwinable when it comes to school loans
- if it does go to the shits contact the onbudsmen that deals with financial aid. if you keep your paperwork straight and didn't fuck up, they will fix it. they fixed mine. http://www.ombudsman.ed.gov/loandefault.html i think that's them.

shit can get sketchy and if something gets wrong, they will pile on some rediculous fees. had a lawyer tell me "this call is costing you 3 grand" so i told him "well i better get my money's worth then so eat a dick" and hung up on him but they did add 3k and took my tax return.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: kevbo999 on August 26, 2009, 02:52:25 PM
I owe 20k for 2 years of useless schooling.  I've been too poor to pay anything back for 3 years now.  I just accept the fact I'll be in debt forever and try not to think about it.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: loophole on August 26, 2009, 02:52:55 PM
thanks rightcoast, but i've already done all the fafsa stuff. i got a stafford subsidised but it just puts a small dent in the cost.
definitely thanks for the paperwork tip sleazy, i'll keep it heavy on managing that. noone wants to be in that situation!

- only borrow if you have a plan that results in you graduating and getting a job that pays more than what you are going to borrow. it's silly to borrow 80 and get out and make 30.
of course, i'm hoping to be making good bank by that time and i think i really can... but naturally i don't have a crystal ball. all of it scares the shit out of me


i was looking at the citibank CitiAssist loan for undergrads to fill in the rest of the money i need.. this is the kind of thing i'm looking for right now. i'm going to compare interest rates with different banks when i wake up, but if anyone knows of any banks to be wary of, that would be good info.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: oyolar on August 26, 2009, 03:44:59 PM
my best advice is look for scholarships. just google them and ask your financial aide department which ones are legit. my mom helped me a lot with this so once i get back to the states i'll ask her for some advice. but rightcoastbiased has given you a lot of good info.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Locbrew on August 26, 2009, 03:47:20 PM
I wouldn't have a college education without scholarships and financial aid, luckily enough I got a couple of art scholarships when I was in high school, they have helped me out a lot.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Tomkins Square Park Bench on August 26, 2009, 04:03:33 PM
wells fargo
PNC

Sallie Mae as a last choice.


loans suck, im having trouble getting them this year. 
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: skate_bored on August 26, 2009, 04:40:43 PM
fasfa helped me out a lot. im a dependant living on my own, and in the first year of college me and my mom took out 6,000 each in loans but i also was going to a school far away and paying dorm fees and shit. i moved home and go to a school thats a little cheaper and dont live on campus, and now my financial aid covers all my classes and i get around 1000-1500 per semester extra to live off of, all for free through need based grants that i wont ever have to pay back. loan wise, just get something subsidized. you wont have to pay any interest til after you finish school. another cool thing is after graduation you can usually get your loan deferred and not have to pay it until you are ready. all of this depends on the state/college but overall try to seem poor as possible and you'll get some money, theres lots to be given out.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: RightCoastBiased on August 26, 2009, 05:21:32 PM
I think the best bet for a person going to college as a freshman is to go to a community college for the first two years. Do really well so that when you go to apply to a university or other college you can ask them for more money. Showing success on the collegiate level carries a lot more weight than a high school career. This is exactly what I was planing on doing, ace community college and get shit tons of free money.

But if you are past that and my other info wasn't applicable then I can only say best of luck. Personally, I didn't want to get to a place where I need those extra student loans. It never seemed worth it and ethically it didn't seem right. But that's a whole other thread.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on August 26, 2009, 05:25:07 PM
I think the best bet for a person going to college as a freshman is to go to a community college for the first two years. Do really well so that when you go to apply to a university or other college you can ask them for more money. Showing success on the collegiate level carries a lot more weight than a high school career. This is exactly what I was planing on doing, ace community college and get shit tons of free money.

really fucking good advice and the classes aren't the only thing that's easier at a community college
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: McCly on August 26, 2009, 06:10:57 PM
I think the best bet for a person going to college as a freshman is to go to a community college for the first two years. Do really well so that when you go to apply to a university or other college you can ask them for more money. Showing success on the collegiate level carries a lot more weight than a high school career. This is exactly what I was planing on doing, ace community college and get shit tons of free money.

really fucking good advice and the classes aren't the only thing that's easier at a community college

this is what I'm doing too, except I'm taking a year off to get shit situated in my life. I was a year ahead all through school, so I'm not really behind.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: crailtapper on August 27, 2009, 09:48:10 AM
mods, can i recommend that this thread be stickyed? there is way too much useful shit in here to let fall by the wayside. all of the kids on here will be grateful come college time.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Tko788 on August 27, 2009, 10:25:00 AM
mods, can i recommend that this thread be stickyed? there is way too much useful shit in here to let fall by the wayside. all of the kids on here will be grateful come college time.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Commercial D on August 27, 2009, 11:48:11 AM
Don't repay them. Borrow all you can then move to a different country. You can start a new credit portfolio there.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on August 27, 2009, 12:02:18 PM
mods, can i recommend that this thread be stickyed? there is way too much useful shit in here to let fall by the wayside. all of the kids on here will be grateful come college time.

but move it to the help section if you do
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: crailtapper on August 28, 2009, 09:08:17 AM
i swear to god i will bump this thread everyday until it is stickyed/stuck/sticked
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: oyolar on September 03, 2009, 11:46:56 PM
I think the best bet for a person going to college as a freshman is to go to a community college for the first two years. Do really well so that when you go to apply to a university or other college you can ask them for more money. Showing success on the collegiate level carries a lot more weight than a high school career. This is exactly what I was planing on doing, ace community college and get shit tons of free money.

But if you are past that and my other info wasn't applicable then I can only say best of luck. Personally, I didn't want to get to a place where I need those extra student loans. It never seemed worth it and ethically it didn't seem right. But that's a whole other thread.

careful with that though. it all depends on what school you want to go to. i know my university doesn't accept community college credits so it could actually result in being a waste of time and/or money. and aside from that, i know a few people that go to a community college by my house and it's exactly like high school for them. some are bored out of their minds, most aren't trying at it, and almost all of them are hanging out with the exact same people and not experiencing anything new which is a huge part of college (in my opinion). that second complaint is a different issue than the money one we're talking about now though.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: StepCounter on September 06, 2009, 11:04:18 AM
Just my two cents:  it's entirely possible to get a great education essentially for free given the amount of information that's available on the internet.  this is especially true for things like programming and art.  i have friends who made more money programming straight out of high school than people who went to college, studied hard, and graduated with a good amount of debt but without any solid skills.

all I'm saying is be resourceful and you can avoid college debt all together.  recall the quote from Good Will Hunting:  "You wasted $150,000 on an education you coulda got for $1.50 in late fees at the public library."
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: No Vaseline on September 06, 2009, 12:56:08 PM
I think the best bet for a person going to college as a freshman is to go to a community college for the first two years. Do really well so that when you go to apply to a university or other college you can ask them for more money. Showing success on the collegiate level carries a lot more weight than a high school career. This is exactly what I was planing on doing, ace community college and get shit tons of free money.

Sound advice. Gen. Ed is Gen. Ed no matter where you go, so you might as well do it a jc where it's cheap.  At a university/undergrad level, you won't be able to take many/if any courses towards a major at first, so you'll essentially be doing the exact same thing as a jc for the first two years anyway. 
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: GnArcIsSisTic on September 07, 2009, 03:55:03 AM
i don't get why people's first priorities are usually loans...

there are grants and scholarships for people with size 7 feet. why don't you look for some of those?
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on September 07, 2009, 05:24:50 AM
Just my two cents:  it's entirely possible to get a great education essentially for free given the amount of information that's available on the internet.  this is especially true for things like programming and art.  i have friends who made more money programming straight out of high school than people who went to college, studied hard, and graduated with a good amount of debt but without any solid skills.


i work with tons of programmers who didn't get college educations but there are a few details your not doing justice.

- they don't make more straight out of high school than someone straight out of college. first programming jobs with no experience are hard to get. you could get involved in open source projects and then use that to jump to a real job, but if negotiating skills are equal, i'd bet the college grad would still get a larger salary.
- everyone i know who's gone the no degree route regrets it on some levels and most go back to school. out of all the guys i've known only two have no interest in going back to get their degree. all the rest have gone back or are currently going back.
- out sourced labor generally goes to programmers from poorer countrys where they take fast track approaches to programming. out sourcing didn't work. it only works when you have a domestic resource to act as architect and team lead and this is because eventhough they've mastered syntax, not having the heavy math and science load results in programmers who don't have as good problem sovling skills and who aren't as good with things like abstraction. also, outsourced labor gets about 1/5 the wage of a domestic resource.
- college teaches you how to learn things really quickly. i can pick up a new technology and run with it really quickly and the reason is because of college. eventhough you learn things that don't relate to your eventaul career path, you still learn how to learn things really fast and it's a life skill that is very useful in programming.
- probably 50% of the jobs require degrees. a lot don't but a lot also do. i'd also assume that this precentage goes up significantly if you decide to go into management. you might work up in your current company and then it gets brought out and the new company comes in and lays off all the managers (happens all the time). well now you have to find another job but if your a manager, i'd guess this would be hard to do with out a BS as most manager jobs would require one. sure you can go back to programming but after taking a huge pay cut. if your in management, you're probably married with a mortage and kids and back sliding would probably suck.

and really, are people really ready to go striaght to working corporate jobs right out of high school? seems lame to me. it'd be like going straight from jr. high to a corporate job if you could. who'd really want to. and i'm not sure that i'd want to work with kids striaght out of high school. they'd have to get paid way less, there's just no other reason that you'd be open to it as a team lead or manager other than "well he's cheap." If you could have a rice graduate for the same cash, rice would win every time. there's just no contest.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: StepCounter on September 07, 2009, 09:02:14 AM
Just my two cents:  it's entirely possible to get a great education essentially for free given the amount of information that's available on the internet.  this is especially true for things like programming and art.  i have friends who made more money programming straight out of high school than people who went to college, studied hard, and graduated with a good amount of debt but without any solid skills.


i work with tons of programmers who didn't get college educations but there are a few details your not doing justice.

- they don't make more straight out of high school than someone straight out of college. first programming jobs with no experience are hard to get. you could get involved in open source projects and then use that to jump to a real job, but if negotiating skills are equal, i'd bet the college grad would still get a larger salary.
- everyone i know who's gone the no degree route regrets it on some levels and most go back to school. out of all the guys i've known only two have no interest in going back to get their degree. all the rest have gone back or are currently going back.
- out sourced labor generally goes to programmers from poorer countrys where they take fast track approaches to programming. out sourcing didn't work. it only works when you have a domestic resource to act as architect and team lead and this is because eventhough they've mastered syntax, not having the heavy math and science load results in programmers who don't have as good problem sovling skills and who aren't as good with things like abstraction. also, outsourced labor gets about 1/5 the wage of a domestic resource.
- college teaches you how to learn things really quickly. i can pick up a new technology and run with it really quickly and the reason is because of college. eventhough you learn things that don't relate to your eventaul career path, you still learn how to learn things really fast and it's a life skill that is very useful in programming.
- probably 50% of the jobs require degrees. a lot don't but a lot also do. i'd also assume that this precentage goes up significantly if you decide to go into management. you might work up in your current company and then it gets brought out and the new company comes in and lays off all the managers (happens all the time). well now you have to find another job but if your a manager, i'd guess this would be hard to do with out a BS as most manager jobs would require one. sure you can go back to programming but after taking a huge pay cut. if your in management, you're probably married with a mortage and kids and back sliding would probably suck.

and really, are people really ready to go striaght to working corporate jobs right out of high school? seems lame to me. it'd be like going straight from jr. high to a corporate job if you could. who'd really want to. and i'm not sure that i'd want to work with kids striaght out of high school. they'd have to get paid way less, there's just no other reason that you'd be open to it as a team lead or manager other than "well he's cheap." If you could have a rice graduate for the same cash, rice would win every time. there's just no contest.

these are definitely valid points.  it's true that in our current society going the no-degree route has downsides (companies probably will choose the candidate w/ a degree and moderate skills over the candidate w/ no-degree and some solid skills).  I don't think this trend will last forever though.  For example start-ups today in general care far more about skills than degrees.  also if one has the skills they can make mobile apps on their own or with their friends and just start getting paid... no resume, no interviews, etc.

so I guess my main point is:  put solid skills first then the degree second... especially if you want to avoid debt (which is highly desirable).


Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on September 08, 2009, 10:19:51 AM
you definitely make a good point but getting those core skills can be difficult if you learn it yourself. i've worked with guys who were exceptions but the guys i currently work with who worked up without degrees definitely go blank if you get too acedemic about things. i have started to dumb down the things that i say to them in the same way that you would when talking to an analsyst. they just simply don't understand fundamental computer science theory or the current industry theory, they only know implementation skills. they know how to write code, create queires, trouble shoot but don't mention any patterns or data structures or automaton or... no design vocabulary what so ever
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Prison Wallet on September 08, 2009, 06:08:15 PM
The only thing I can add to the student loan conversation is ask about federal loan repayment options before you choose which loan to go with. I know for me, I work at a Title I school (which means the community I serve meets federal definitions of poverty) and one type of loan offers federal loan repayment and one doesn't. Mind doesn't, but I could have easily went with a Stafford loan which does. Because I didn't ask the right questions I miss out on a couple thousand dollars a year.

With healthcare it's the same deal. Ask about loan repayment especially if you're interested in under-served populations. My wife qualifies for $25k worth of loan repayment a year for two years with the place she works. Which basically cuts her debt in half.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on September 09, 2009, 04:50:02 PM
these are definitely valid points.  it's true that in our current society going the no-degree route has downsides (companies probably will choose the candidate w/ a degree and moderate skills over the candidate w/ no-degree and some solid skills).  I don't think this trend will last forever though.  For example start-ups today in general care far more about skills than degrees.  also if one has the skills they can make mobile apps on their own or with their friends and just start getting paid... no resume, no interviews, etc.

so I guess my main point is:  put solid skills first then the degree second... especially if you want to avoid debt (which is highly desirable).




here's an exerpt from a job description for a job that i'm currently interviewing for

Quote
_________ is seeking enthusiastic workers who have a proven track record in developing .NET business applications, are passionate about .NET (as evidenced by deep technical knowledge and familiarity with the latest Microsoft technologies), have strong computer science backgrounds, have exceptional problem-solving skills, and are willing and eager to contribute to the development of a top quality product.

the bold part is what i'm refering to and both would be things that you get with a degree but not with fast track approaches. if the market dries up or outsourcing starts taking the easier to get jobs these core skills will become more and more important.

i'd just argue that the ability to pay down debt is more important than debt, my wife and my combined school debt only cost us 500 a month which is not significant considering the earning potential we both gained.

and you do bring up very good points and options, so i don't want to seem like i'm just trying to say what you are saying is wrong because it isn't and it is good advice. i just wanted to clarify that there is definitely a huge gain from school that you don't get in DIY fast track approaches and even if your competitive in the market today, careers are long and you want to make sure you will still be competitive in 25 years. also, the whole mcse thing showed what happens when a fast track approach is available to a career choice. that was paying 50k starting and up to 80k or 100k for a while there, everyone and their dog went out and got one because you could get certified in 3-6 months and then market got flooded and now i'd guess you couldn't really do shit with just an mcse. a lot of those guys are probably working at best buy now.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: StepCounter on September 09, 2009, 09:24:28 PM
these are definitely valid points.  it's true that in our current society going the no-degree route has downsides (companies probably will choose the candidate w/ a degree and moderate skills over the candidate w/ no-degree and some solid skills).  I don't think this trend will last forever though.  For example start-ups today in general care far more about skills than degrees.  also if one has the skills they can make mobile apps on their own or with their friends and just start getting paid... no resume, no interviews, etc.

so I guess my main point is:  put solid skills first then the degree second... especially if you want to avoid debt (which is highly desirable).




here's an exerpt from a job description for a job that i'm currently interviewing for

Quote
_________ is seeking enthusiastic workers who have a proven track record in developing .NET business applications, are passionate about .NET (as evidenced by deep technical knowledge and familiarity with the latest Microsoft technologies), have strong computer science backgrounds, have exceptional problem-solving skills, and are willing and eager to contribute to the development of a top quality product.

the bold part is what i'm refering to and both would be things that you get with a degree but not with fast track approaches. if the market dries up or outsourcing starts taking the easier to get jobs these core skills will become more and more important.

i'd just argue that the ability to pay down debt is more important than debt, my wife and my combined school debt only cost us 500 a month which is not significant considering the earning potential we both gained.

and you do bring up very good points and options, so i don't want to seem like i'm just trying to say what you are saying is wrong because it isn't and it is good advice. i just wanted to clarify that there is definitely a huge gain from school that you don't get in DIY fast track approaches and even if your competitive in the market today, careers are long and you want to make sure you will still be competitive in 25 years. also, the whole mcse thing showed what happens when a fast track approach is available to a career choice. that was paying 50k starting and up to 80k or 100k for a while there, everyone and their dog went out and got one because you could get certified in 3-6 months and then market got flooded and now i'd guess you couldn't really do shit with just an mcse. a lot of those guys are probably working at best buy now.

Yeah school can definitely be good.  To be clear my approach has not been "fast-track".  Over the last 5-6 years I've studied algorithms, data structures, design patterns, etc on my own, w/ friends, via programming contests and so on.  To make this work one needs to be dedicated... similar to the time/effort put in when learning the basics of skating.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on September 10, 2009, 03:21:09 AM
you are definitely doing what your suggesting the right way but it's definitely a faster track because anyone who gets computer science also studies those things but also studies hierachical statemachine theory, calculus, calculus based physics, linear algebra, compilers, computer architecture, advanced math classes, advanced com sci electives, ect... just to name a few not to mention all the social sciences and other core classes that anyone with a 4 year degree gets. and for me i'd never be as hard core about studying all the time if i didn't get warmed up in school, but i have friends who are more sucessful than me (for now) and more well read on current technology who've taken the approach your suggesting. so it's really about the person but it definitely takes a special kind of person to do what you are talking about and do it well.

it's great to have another tech geek on the board. what technologies you into?
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: rawbertson. on September 14, 2009, 09:11:01 AM
you guys are making this way too hard
go to the bank and set up an appointment
or talk to your guidance counsellor if you are already in school for a year at least (college i mean)

otherwise get a job and live at mom adn dad's house like i did then you have no debt
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on September 14, 2009, 09:50:36 AM
yeah, not everyone's parents live in places with good schools. mine didn't. i worked but still had to have loans on top of grants.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: RightCoastBiased on September 14, 2009, 06:27:57 PM
you guys are making this way too hard
go to the bank and set up an appointment
or talk to your guidance counsellor if you are already in school for a year at least (college i mean)

otherwise get a job and live at mom adn dad's house like i did then you have no debt

No one here is making this complicated, it just is complicated. If you go to the bank and take out a loan you are most likely going to have interest rates that are higher then what it would be if you borrowed through the processes described in this thread. Also going and getting a 10k-30k loan is not easy and you are going to have to start paying the loans back right away. It isn't likely a college kid with a full course load is going to be able to do that.

And don't you live in canada? What do you know about the way it works here?
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Prison Wallet on September 14, 2009, 08:07:26 PM
Shit is complicated... You end up just signing paperwork in good faith and go numb. Same goes with buying a house; I've bought two and still don't know what the fuck happened in the mortgage office once I walked out.

Basically you want to go the financial aid office and see what options are out there. Find out which loan has the lowest interest rate and has the most opportunities for federal loan repayment. I personally would only go with a federal loan or a long standing loan program with a good reputation. Something that will let you adjust payments according to how much you make, which all the loans my wife and I have, have done.

Any of you looking at school loans know what the going rates look like?
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: loophole on September 14, 2009, 11:05:14 PM
i went to a meeting today and they talked about this IBR (income-based repayment) program for repaying student loans. after 25 years of repayment all the remaining balance and interest is dropped.
http://www.ibrinfo.org/
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Prison Wallet on September 15, 2009, 07:31:07 AM
Very cool Loophole.

The availability/low interested/gov't repayment options make student loans a great aspect of the American education system. A few weeks ago my wife was accepted to the Health Services Corps and in two weeks we'll have 50Gs deposited in our savings account that has to go to pay off our student loans. The program is for health professionals who work with under-served populations, which is what my wife would be doing regardless of the repayment program. That money will almost cut our school debt in half.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: rawbertson. on September 15, 2009, 08:27:08 AM
you guys are making this way too hard
go to the bank and set up an appointment
or talk to your guidance counsellor if you are already in school for a year at least (college i mean)

otherwise get a job and live at mom adn dad's house like i did then you have no debt

And don't you live in canada? What do you know about the way it works here?

You make a stellar point. I should have remembered going to school in the USA is like 30,000$ a year. It sucks for you guys especially because we have schools that are rated just as high as your "Ivy League" schools but they don't cost nearly as much for Canadians to attend because the government subsizes post secondary education here. So for you guys to come here to go to school, it would still cost you 30,000$, but for us its only like 4,000$.

I went to a community college it was only 2,000$ a year for tuition and its the top rated college in Ontario as far as I know also in Canada and books were maybe $1,000 during the course of the year and food and bus passes only probably cost between 500-1000$. so I should consdier myself fairly lucky. no wonder i had no debt and i was partying like every day and only working 2 days a week driving a forklift. dont take it for granted kids.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: RightCoastBiased on September 15, 2009, 12:03:57 PM
you guys are making this way too hard
go to the bank and set up an appointment
or talk to your guidance counsellor if you are already in school for a year at least (college i mean)

otherwise get a job and live at mom adn dad's house like i did then you have no debt

And don't you live in canada? What do you know about the way it works here?

You make a stellar point. I should have remembered going to school in the USA is like 30,000$ a year. It sucks for you guys especially because we have schools that are rated just as high as your "Ivy League" schools but they don't cost nearly as much for Canadians to attend because the government subsizes post secondary education here. So for you guys to come here to go to school, it would still cost you 30,000$, but for us its only like 4,000$.

I went to a community college it was only 2,000$ a year for tuition and its the top rated college in Ontario as far as I know also in Canada and books were maybe $1,000 during the course of the year and food and bus passes only probably cost between 500-1000$. so I should consdier myself fairly lucky. no wonder i had no debt and i was partying like every day and only working 2 days a week driving a forklift. dont take it for granted kids.

I wish the US had a system like that. It shouldn't cost someone 200k to get a PHD.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: rawbertson. on September 21, 2009, 10:46:38 AM
its cause they are trying to keep rich people rich man its bullshit. it makes it fucking impossible for average people to gain knowledge. fucking retarded thats why americans keep gettin dumber.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: oyolar on September 21, 2009, 01:48:38 PM
you guys are making this way too hard
go to the bank and set up an appointment
or talk to your guidance counsellor if you are already in school for a year at least (college i mean)

otherwise get a job and live at mom adn dad's house like i did then you have no debt

And don't you live in canada? What do you know about the way it works here?

You make a stellar point. I should have remembered going to school in the USA is like 30,000$ a year. It sucks for you guys especially because we have schools that are rated just as high as your "Ivy League" schools but they don't cost nearly as much for Canadians to attend because the government subsizes post secondary education here. So for you guys to come here to go to school, it would still cost you 30,000$, but for us its only like 4,000$.

I went to a community college it was only 2,000$ a year for tuition and its the top rated college in Ontario as far as I know also in Canada and books were maybe $1,000 during the course of the year and food and bus passes only probably cost between 500-1000$. so I should consdier myself fairly lucky. no wonder i had no debt and i was partying like every day and only working 2 days a week driving a forklift. dont take it for granted kids.

don't want to sound like a dick, but this just isn't true. plus despite what everyone wants to think, ivy leagues are not good schools (necessarily). they're just old and on the east coast.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: max power on October 20, 2009, 08:41:52 PM
don't want to sound like a dick, but this just isn't true. plus despite what everyone wants to think, ivy leagues are not good schools (necessarily). they're just old and on the east coast.
what the ivy's give you are connections and a prestigious name on your degree, not necessarily the best education. sometimes those serve you better than a great education.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on October 21, 2009, 09:01:12 AM
it's not an ivy school but rice is the closest thing we have to that in houston and i used to just think it was a bunch of hype until i worked with some rice students. the computer science program was way better and the smartest UH students would basically be average or below when compared to rice. i have no idea about whether ivy = better education but in houston, rice most certainly does. i'd hire a rice over a non-rice intern without thinking twice about it if the decision was mine.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: hekkahyphy on November 02, 2009, 07:44:49 PM
i am so glad you guys posted this... figuring this crap out alone sucks donkey dung
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Commercial D on November 06, 2009, 12:48:01 AM
You don't pay for an Ivy League school for the education quality. You do it for the connections and the prestige. There's nothing in Canada that even comes close. I'd rather spend $200k at Yale than $50k at McGill to get the same degree, though the quality of academic instruction would be comparable.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: tonysean on January 28, 2010, 03:20:12 PM
I wouldn't have a college education without scholarships and financial aid, luckily enough I got a couple of art scholarships when I was in high school, they have helped me out a lot.

how do you get hooked up with those. i know you have to set up a portfolio but i don't know what to do with it or really what they would be looking for in it. i'm a photographer planning on art school so a scholarship would be rad for me.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: McDuff on March 31, 2010, 12:49:12 PM
I wouldn't have a college education without scholarships and financial aid, luckily enough I got a couple of art scholarships when I was in high school, they have helped me out a lot.

how do you get hooked up with those. i know you have to set up a portfolio but i don't know what to do with it or really what they would be looking for in it. i'm a photographer planning on art school so a scholarship would be rad for me.

you have to apply, maybe write an essay or two... but my mother works in a library and brought home a shit ton of books about free scholarships.... im sure you can find some on the internet tho. like someone said above, they have scholarships for everything.


and thanks for bumping this thread up. im going crazy deciding on what to do about student loans/going back to school... any input would be fucking awesome....

aright. out of high school i attended a community college for a year, then moved to philly and went to a 4 year school and racked up about 20k plus in loans, and didnt finish. im glad i dipped while i did because the school was pricey as FUCK. but anyway, here i am back at home in nj, and id like to attend that same community college again... but this time im not sure i could get help through financial aid because i havent begun to pay back my $20k, and im constantly getting letters/phonecalls from them about it... i make $10 an hour, roughly $260 a week, and i guess im just not sure whether its worth it to even go back to school. 1 class for the semester is about $500. of course i have bills and shit to pay, so it will be a bit tight money wise... a lot of people on here are convincing me that going to school is pretty much a waste of time, when you can get the same education elsewhere. but in order to get a decent job, i feel like i should have AT LEAST an associates degree.... i dont know. thoughts?
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on March 31, 2010, 12:52:43 PM
obama just changed the school loan game and doubled pell grants. definitely going to be way better for you guys that get to take advantage of these than it was for me.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: art hellman on April 09, 2010, 11:37:16 AM
i will never get out from under my law school loans...

...but you definitely want loans that allow you the option of throwing extra money at them when you can, so you can gradually drop the monthly payment amounts (similar to what prison wallet was saying)
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Sleazy on April 09, 2010, 01:15:32 PM
sure you will, you'll be grabbing that lawyer cash

where you been homie? long time no post
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: adumb on July 19, 2010, 02:23:47 PM
obama just changed the school loan game and doubled pell grants. definitely going to be way better for you guys that get to take advantage of these than it was for me.

But the Loan amounts were decreased. So basically you get the same amount, you just don't have to pay back as much as long as you graduate. I think the federal government is banking on a high drop-out rate
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: pugmaster on July 31, 2010, 12:33:56 AM
i am so glad you guys posted this... figuring this crap out alone sucks donkey dung

ol' pugmaster has got ur back
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: mattyc on February 28, 2011, 02:53:42 PM
All mine were with Sally Mae.  Don't know that any of the actual banks/loan companies are all too different.  What I do know and what they don't tell you is.  Once you get out of school you need to consolidate your student loans. (It's bundling all your multiple student loans into 1 new loan).  And what they don't tell you about that is if all of your loans are with one company you legally have to give that company the opportunity to consolidate the loans.  So basically if all your loans are one company, you have to consolidate with that company.  Doesn't sound like a terrible thing, and it's not....but loan companies offer all sorts of incentives to consolidate with them.  ie...they'll offer you money to consolidate with them.  So you don't have that opportunity if all of your loans are with the same company.

-mattyc
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Siem van Woerkom on September 11, 2011, 04:54:53 AM
Dont stress out to much about them, a lot of people have one, and you can pay em off easy :)
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: Jared on December 04, 2013, 08:11:00 AM
I'm with you, student loans are shitty. I guess just make sure you're in a major that is in high demand for jobs after graduation (Graphic Design, Engineering, etc.). Not many jobs out there for anthropology majors haha.
Title: Re: student loans?
Post by: evs on August 09, 2016, 05:38:48 AM
If you are over 24, look into the pell grant