Author Topic: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part  (Read 1161 times)

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DaveFuck

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Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« on: August 25, 2018, 07:51:01 AM »



Budo

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2018, 08:44:56 AM »
I would describe his style as "subtle".

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verylowimpact

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2018, 10:48:06 AM »
Wild. That was sick.

MexicanSpaniard

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2018, 12:13:16 PM »
I'm gonna have to watch this again
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Peter Zagreus

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2018, 01:03:20 PM »
Top 3 Japanese sk8bois

mattone

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2018, 05:11:05 PM »
Spot selection!

SLAPASONIC

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2018, 04:33:13 AM »
This man has been on a fucking rampage since 2016, can't believe how much footage he is banging out in the last 2 years. That first line by the river in his Tone part is right near where I live.

Adidas - The Splits (2018) ends the whole thing


Traffic - Look Left (2017)


Mandible Claw - Spirit Quest (2016)

Prize Fighter Cutlery - Welcome Hiroki Muraoka (2015)



He absolutely destroys that last spot too, never seen any footage of anyone else skating there.

mattchew

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2018, 08:34:41 AM »
Man, sooooo fucking good; such a smooth style, and absolutely subtle--well put Budo.
Definitely some of the quickest feet in skating right now.
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silhouette

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2018, 06:07:45 PM »
This man has been on a fucking rampage since 2016, can't believe how much footage he is banging out in the last 2 years. That first line by the river in his Tone part is right near where I live.

Adidas - The Splits (2018) ends the whole thing


Traffic - Look Left (2017)


Mandible Claw - Spirit Quest (2016)

Prize Fighter Cutlery - Welcome Hiroki Muraoka (2015)



He absolutely destroys that last spot too, never seen any footage of anyone else skating there.

Seriously. Hiroki's been a favorite for years and I'm so stoked to see him put out so much footage these days. He's just been stacking for years, some of the footage in this is four years old. I've probably posted about his Traffic part a dozen of times before but honestly it's the only recent video part I regularly rewatch to this day (as opposed to passively browsing Instagram clips), it has a classic energy to it I hadn't felt since PJWHL - the street spots, the creativity.

I'm glad he did that quick noseslide to back tail, reminded me of the noseslide / 50 / noseslide from his Traffic part which was one of my favorite clips in that. In real life that fountain is fucked. A few years back Glen Fox and I were in Japan and came across it and we started joking about how insane just a quick ollie / ollie would be. Not so much because of the length of the platform but because the curves and unevenness of that dish are yearning for you to hang up on them. Hiroki was with us and politely schooled us on the list of tricks he had done there - kickflip, pressure flip, impossible. I've been waiting to each trick to surface ever since, now the list is complete.

tkp

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2018, 06:37:44 PM »
rad part.

slapasonic, where do you live?

SneakySecrets

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2018, 06:41:04 PM »
He fucking rips.  I think itís so awesome how Japanese skating has its own style with rapid-fire clusters of tricks.  Reminds me of Mark suciu or Bobby puelo.  I donít think Iíve ever seen a Japanese skater huck down a big gap or skate a handrail.  They just donít give a fuck about that stuff.

Made me want to go back and watch this part again:

silhouette

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2018, 07:37:08 PM »
He fucking rips.  I think itís so awesome how Japanese skating has its own style with rapid-fire clusters of tricks.  Reminds me of Mark suciu or Bobby puelo.  I donít think Iíve ever seen a Japanese skater huck down a big gap or skate a handrail.  They just donít give a fuck about that stuff.

Those guys are a minority in the Japanese scene actually, they just happen to be visible because their shit is different, but not everybody in Japan skates like that at all. Japan has plenty of skatepark and classic street rippers who follow the Californian trends a lot more (ie. Lesque skateboards). Gou Miyagi used to skate some crazy handrails in his prime (over a decade before he naturally went all postmodern) and he's far from being the only one. Takahiro Morita's Overground Broadcasting was filmed over the course of seven years and is packed with incredible shit all styles considered from all over Japan. People like Shin Okada used to huck, go rewatch that line in the Deca video with the nollie backside flip, sw varial heel then nollie hardflip. They do have different spots, but they certainly do 'give a fuck about that [traditional skating] stuff', in fact I feel like a lot of Japanese skaters are savants and actually give a relatively considerable fuck about literally everything. The quick footed stuff and alternative spot approach is the tip of a cultural iceberg, not its most accurate representation, luckily it's clearly its most interesting section though.

mattchew

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2018, 07:45:09 PM »
He fucking rips.  I think itís so awesome how Japanese skating has its own style with rapid-fire clusters of tricks.  Reminds me of Mark suciu or Bobby puelo.  I donít think Iíve ever seen a Japanese skater huck down a big gap or skate a handrail.  They just donít give a fuck about that stuff.

Those guys are a minority in the Japanese scene actually, they just happen to be visible because their shit is different, but not everybody in Japan skates like that at all. Japan has plenty of skatepark and classic street rippers who follow the Californian trends a lot more (ie. Lesque skateboards). Gou Miyagi used to skate some crazy handrails in his prime (over a decade before he naturally went all postmodern) and he's far from being the only one. Takahiro Morita's Overground Broadcasting was filmed over the course of seven years and is packed with incredible shit all styles considered from all over Japan. People like Shin Okada used to huck, go rewatch that line in the Deca video with the nollie backside flip, sw varial heel then nollie hardflip. They do have different spots, but they certainly do 'give a fuck about that [traditional skating] stuff', in fact I feel like a lot of Japanese skaters are savants and actually give a relatively considerable fuck about literally everything. The quick footed stuff and alternative spot approach is the tip of a cultural iceberg, not its most accurate representation, luckily it's clearly its most interesting section though.

This and your other post kick ass. Love gaining insight into non-US skate cultures. Regionalism is one of the best things about skating in general I feel (though the internet is slowly blurring the lines)
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SneakySecrets

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2018, 07:56:06 PM »
^ Thanks for that Silhouette.  I guess the Overgound Broadcasting-type skating has an easier time getting featured on mainstream media like Thrasher, making it 100 times more likely to hit my eyeballs.

Did you live over there? 
« Last Edit: August 26, 2018, 07:59:18 PM by SneakySecrets »

silhouette

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2018, 08:32:38 PM »
This and your other post kick ass. Love gaining insight into non-US skate cultures. Regionalism is one of the best things about skating in general I feel (though the internet is slowly blurring the lines)

I feel like the internet is only making regionalism more prevalent actually. Now everybody who skates (and has access to a phone) even in the middle of buttfuck nowhere earns the potential to be seen, and if they do interesting stuff they will stand out on their own due scale. You no longer have to order local full-lengths with doubt triggering cover art in order to get a (curated) taste of what's happening overseas in terms of raw skateboarding. Even those days of ordering local DVD's owe everything to the internet as it is the platform that served to establish basic communication in between scenes that bypassed the filter of print media. Hell, pretty much every smaller city skateboarder who's currently sponsored probably owes a lot more to the internet than we think. I think the lines are getting blurred in a good way, people will always be individuals so long as there will be fucked up bullshit to try and skate, if anything what we're getting out of this is that one no longer needs to fit in a mold and know the right people to publicly exist.

^ Thanks for that Silhouette.  I guess the Overgound Broadcasting-type skating has an easier time getting featured on mainstream media like Thrasher, making it 100 times more likely to hit my eyeballs.

Did you live over there?

Never lived in Japan, but I've been there to skate, following the scene for over a decade and friends with dozens of Japanese skaters for a decade. Overground Broadcasting is packed with "conventional" street skating when you make the effort of looking past the production and presentation with the filming / editing, just super sick on difficult and good-looking spots and made look a certain way. It features tons of pros from the whole world over as well. But like you're saying, all most westerners like to remember is how exotic Gou Miyagi's part is, because a lot of people would rather laugh at cultural diversity like it's impenetrable as opposed to make the effort to learn.

Gay Imp Sausage Metal

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2018, 10:11:44 PM »
He fucking rips.  I think itís so awesome how Japanese skating has its own style with rapid-fire clusters of tricks.  Reminds me of Mark suciu or Bobby puelo.  I donít think Iíve ever seen a Japanese skater huck down a big gap or skate a handrail.  They just donít give a fuck about that stuff.

Those guys are a minority in the Japanese scene actually, they just happen to be visible because their shit is different, but not everybody in Japan skates like that at all. Japan has plenty of skatepark and classic street rippers who follow the Californian trends a lot more (ie. Lesque skateboards). Gou Miyagi used to skate some crazy handrails in his prime (over a decade before he naturally went all postmodern) and he's far from being the only one. Takahiro Morita's Overground Broadcasting was filmed over the course of seven years and is packed with incredible shit all styles considered from all over Japan. People like Shin Okada used to huck, go rewatch that line in the Deca video with the nollie backside flip, sw varial heel then nollie hardflip. They do have different spots, but they certainly do 'give a fuck about that [traditional skating] stuff', in fact I feel like a lot of Japanese skaters are savants and actually give a relatively considerable fuck about literally everything. The quick footed stuff and alternative spot approach is the tip of a cultural iceberg, not its most accurate representation, luckily it's clearly its most interesting section though.
this! most dudes over here were straight up clone/ homage skaters back in the early 2000s and this is still true for the majority of skaters here. Great to see the individual styles finally getting so much love overseas but dudes like Chopper sat under the radar for 10+ years just because his style of skating wasn't popular at the time in mainstream skate media.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2018, 10:15:41 PM by Gay Imp Sausage Metal »

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silhouette

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Re: Hiroki Muraoka's "Tone" Part
« Reply #16 on: August 27, 2018, 06:13:03 PM »