Author Topic: books to read  (Read 248066 times)

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Joust Ostrich

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Re: books to read
« Reply #930 on: April 09, 2011, 10:38:27 AM »
Started this yesterday.

Inanimate Object

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Re: books to read
« Reply #931 on: April 10, 2011, 07:16:46 PM »
Just finished this:



Nice intro to DFW for me - probably won't have time to read any more stuff by him prior to picking up Pale King, so I hope it's awesome.

sven thorkel

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Re: books to read
« Reply #932 on: April 16, 2011, 01:14:42 PM »


It's pretty decent. Doesn't go anywhere and sometimes comes off as too whiny, but it's not to long and it has its moments.



Started reading this today. Hopefully it doesn't disappoint.
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Hexagon

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Re: books to read
« Reply #933 on: April 16, 2011, 02:36:49 PM »
^
I know you'll probably catch flak for not finishing On The Road, but I'll give you my support. I couldn't finish Dharma Bums. I'm not to into Western Buddhists, so it really wasn't my thing. ? ? ? ?

It really just bored the shit out of me. Seems like he was trying to convince himself that his story was worth telling. Maybe it was just his "spontaneous" style of writing. Like one long facebook post for lack of a better description.

I understand that the Beat era writers did a lot for defying traditional American values and battling censorship, but I think a lot of the books are pretty overrated.

the beats are interesting. so many come up thinking that their works, especially in poetics, are liberating through defying or redefining ideas of form and i suppose cultural acceptance. kerouac and ginsberg attended columbia. Olson attended Wesleyan.  they emulated the form and ideas of the modernist era as exemplified by EzPound, Eliot, and really as she is being studied more, Mina Loy. Modernists were concerned with with redefining the world through eyes that had been subjected to the flash of WWI and the psychological upheaval presented by Freud and Nietzsche. Bring into the scope educated Harlem writers like Hughes with the Bukka White blues train back beat or McKay with Jamaican patois developing poetry in response to the lynchings, popular Jazz, blues recordings, shit, Birth of a Nation was the most popular film in the US until 1930 or so, and you've got something that has never before been attempted in the literary world- call it cohesion through reconstruction of the world. Shelley said "poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world."

so following this modernity the Beats were just a natural response to the modernist era- look at the world, the US in particular during the early post modern era as a recent creation built of rubble. 25 monarchies had been overthrown during WWI, there's no way stability can come about, anywhere, in 40 year time frame. So of course the ideas of "Western Buddhism" are attractive- with the world a disastrous place, living through nothingness is the grand scheme.  Nothingness, however, cannot be achieved without the right knowledge- understanding the rudiments of form, literature, history, and culture.

So to say that many of their books are overrated, you're probably right but should try to wrap around the idea that Beat works aren't weren't written for everybody. The idea of a rating of a piece of work comes about when a writer isn't trying to gain a particular audience and it is read as though it should be something... It's like attempting to define "nothingness."

Anyhow, if you're interested, Charles Olson wrote poetry and coined the term "Beats." there are some interesting collections of letters too.

I'm reading a collection of letters written by Pound while he was in an open air cage at the end of WWII on charges of treason called Letters of Captivity.

The Sun Also Rises is a good one by Hemingway.

If you're at all interested in Modern literature check out Stravinsky's Rites of Spring on Youtube. It's a strange play- when released such confusion was aroused in the audience that they erupted in fist fights and tore the theater apart.  

Whoever was writing about Ulysses, Frank Delaney does a podcast breaking it down at http://blog.frankdelaney.com/re-joyce/

Wrong. Herbert Huncke coined the term "beat" find his shit, it's all OOP.  The Herbert Hunkce reader these days runs for 50 bucks plus, he's the voice and reason. Plus my favorite, personally.

Man Without A Plan

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Re: books to read
« Reply #934 on: April 17, 2011, 08:02:13 PM »


Just got done reading that, pretty intense. 

Might get this next. Read The Prologue and it was good.

« Last Edit: April 17, 2011, 08:07:15 PM by Man Without A Plan »

steve

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Re: books to read
« Reply #935 on: April 17, 2011, 10:23:10 PM »
^
I know you'll probably catch flak for not finishing On The Road, but I'll give you my support. I couldn't finish Dharma Bums. I'm not to into Western Buddhists, so it really wasn't my thing. ? ? ? ?

It really just bored the shit out of me. Seems like he was trying to convince himself that his story was worth telling. Maybe it was just his "spontaneous" style of writing. Like one long facebook post for lack of a better description.

I understand that the Beat era writers did a lot for defying traditional American values and battling censorship, but I think a lot of the books are pretty overrated.

the beats are interesting. so many come up thinking that their works, especially in poetics, are liberating through defying or redefining ideas of form and i suppose cultural acceptance. kerouac and ginsberg attended columbia. Olson attended Wesleyan.  they emulated the form and ideas of the modernist era as exemplified by EzPound, Eliot, and really as she is being studied more, Mina Loy. Modernists were concerned with with redefining the world through eyes that had been subjected to the flash of WWI and the psychological upheaval presented by Freud and Nietzsche. Bring into the scope educated Harlem writers like Hughes with the Bukka White blues train back beat or McKay with Jamaican patois developing poetry in response to the lynchings, popular Jazz, blues recordings, shit, Birth of a Nation was the most popular film in the US until 1930 or so, and you've got something that has never before been attempted in the literary world- call it cohesion through reconstruction of the world. Shelley said "poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world."

so following this modernity the Beats were just a natural response to the modernist era- look at the world, the US in particular during the early post modern era as a recent creation built of rubble. 25 monarchies had been overthrown during WWI, there's no way stability can come about, anywhere, in 40 year time frame. So of course the ideas of "Western Buddhism" are attractive- with the world a disastrous place, living through nothingness is the grand scheme.  Nothingness, however, cannot be achieved without the right knowledge- understanding the rudiments of form, literature, history, and culture.

So to say that many of their books are overrated, you're probably right but should try to wrap around the idea that Beat works aren't weren't written for everybody. The idea of a rating of a piece of work comes about when a writer isn't trying to gain a particular audience and it is read as though it should be something... It's like attempting to define "nothingness."

Anyhow, if you're interested, Charles Olson wrote poetry and coined the term "Beats." there are some interesting collections of letters too.

I'm reading a collection of letters written by Pound while he was in an open air cage at the end of WWII on charges of treason called Letters of Captivity.

The Sun Also Rises is a good one by Hemingway.

If you're at all interested in Modern literature check out Stravinsky's Rites of Spring on Youtube. It's a strange play- when released such confusion was aroused in the audience that they erupted in fist fights and tore the theater apart.  

Whoever was writing about Ulysses, Frank Delaney does a podcast breaking it down at http://blog.frankdelaney.com/re-joyce/

Wrong. Herbert Huncke coined the term "beat" find his shit, it's all OOP.  The Herbert Hunkce reader these days runs for 50 bucks plus, he's the voice and reason. Plus my favorite, personally.


yeah, man, i realized i fucked that up- he termed "post modern" which runs hand in hand with "beats"

also, olson is the guy who brought Moby Dick to the mainstream in the forties with Call Me Ishmael. he's excellent

VictoriousOG

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Re: books to read
« Reply #936 on: April 20, 2011, 02:35:30 PM »
I'm going to the public library later, what books do y'all strongly recommend?

Claude Tanner

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Re: books to read
« Reply #937 on: April 20, 2011, 05:37:54 PM »


I'm in a  Scifi phase right now

VictoriousOG

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Re: books to read
« Reply #938 on: April 20, 2011, 05:39:50 PM »
Picked up these two:


Never heard of this one.

David

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Re: books to read
« Reply #939 on: April 23, 2011, 11:33:38 AM »
if you want to know about native american history, read this.


highly recommended. pick it up if you've got the time. they also made a movie based on the book but it does not come close to the same level of greatness.
 

I've also got a copy of this at the moment,
« Last Edit: April 23, 2011, 11:38:11 AM by David »

steve

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Re: books to read
« Reply #940 on: April 23, 2011, 01:17:41 PM »
if you want to know about native american history, read this.


highly recommended. pick it up if you've got the time. they also made a movie based on the book but it does not come close to the same level of greatness.
 

I've also got a copy of this at the moment,


both of those books are solid reads. death on horseback is a good one too

VictoriousOG

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Re: books to read
« Reply #941 on: April 23, 2011, 06:22:27 PM »
Finished this:

Really good read. Never seen the "In Cold Blood" movie, but I have seen "Capote". The book was REALLY well written, I mean the amount of information and detail that Capote put into everything was just amazing, almost too much to where I think he made it all up. All the parts up until the last one were interesting to read. The last one was just the trial and was boring to read if you had already seen the movie "Capote". Regardless, pick up this book and enjoy it to the fullest. Right now I'm two chapters deep into "No Country For Old Men" and loving it so far.

Truancy

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Re: books to read
« Reply #942 on: May 05, 2011, 01:46:09 PM »
Pick this up:



I got it used for like 4 bucks a couple months ago, just finished it. It's pretty short, and it reads soooo nicely.

It's more of a novel than just a textbook. He fills it with these interesting paragraph interludes of his dreams and shit. Fascinating. yougottapickitup
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frig deuce

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Re: books to read
« Reply #943 on: May 05, 2011, 07:58:34 PM »


I read it twice since I got it about a month ago. Its really inspiring, funny too. Makes me feel less crazy about everything.
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brycickle

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Re: books to read
« Reply #944 on: May 05, 2011, 08:06:06 PM »


Almost done with this, if you liked Kitchen Confidential, then you'll like this.

 You and the D00D have turned this thread into a horrible head-on-collision between a short bus full of retarded kids and a van full of paraplegics.



tre killa

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Re: books to read
« Reply #945 on: May 05, 2011, 09:37:31 PM »
Im actually reading the hobbit for the first time, i cant complain its pretty good so far.

Nosferatu

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Re: books to read
« Reply #946 on: May 05, 2011, 09:59:10 PM »
Anyone read this?


Finished it last night.  Super good.  But you gotta get to the end.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2011, 04:53:37 PM by Nosferatu »
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VictoriousOG

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Re: books to read
« Reply #947 on: May 05, 2011, 10:03:32 PM »
Finished No Country For Old Men. Awesome read and a lot more stuff was left out of the movie. Starting to read "The Motel Life" and it's pretty interesting; an easy read.

Mooley

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Re: books to read
« Reply #948 on: May 06, 2011, 01:17:52 AM »


Almost done with this, if you liked Kitchen Confidential, then you'll like this.

I've been meaning to pick up Kitchen Confidential, love that dude's TV show.

Truancy

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Re: books to read
« Reply #949 on: May 06, 2011, 12:58:08 PM »


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Re: books to read
« Reply #950 on: May 06, 2011, 01:35:28 PM »
I'm taking an independent research class on the Marquis de Sade so I'm reading The 120 Days of Sodom right now.


Inanimate Object

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Re: books to read
« Reply #951 on: May 06, 2011, 11:45:20 PM »
Just finished these two:



I think this may be McCarthy's best - it's poignant in a way that a lot of his stuff isn't.

And this:



Which is like... sci-fi Siddhartha. This is probably the most original Hugo award winning book that I've read. Apparently Neil Gaiman was pretty into this book and American Gods was partially influenced by it.

Now I'm taking a break from fiction and reading this:



It's about statistics, probability, and how these things are counter-intuitive to our perception of how the universe works.

Smell Good

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Re: books to read
« Reply #952 on: May 07, 2011, 08:51:46 AM »
Anyone read this?
http://thecultureconcordance.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/the-savage-detectives.jpg?w=300&h=429

Finished it last night.  Super good.  But you gotta get to the end.
Like many, the only Bola?o work I've read was 2666. Once I got to "The Part About the Crimes" it lost a lot of its steam and I lost interest.

stab

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Re: books to read
« Reply #953 on: May 07, 2011, 08:59:40 AM »
gravity's rainbow by thomas pynchon!

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GISM

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Re: books to read
« Reply #954 on: May 07, 2011, 11:08:32 AM »

Not sure if I finished this actually but I don't really care. Way too drawn out but the double narrative was cool.


Reading this for the first time

sven thorkel

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Re: books to read
« Reply #955 on: May 07, 2011, 11:24:21 AM »

Which is like... sci-fi Siddhartha. This is probably the most original Hugo award winning book that I've read. Apparently Neil Gaiman was pretty into this book and American Gods was partially influenced by it.


Has anyone read American Gods? I browsed through the plot on wikipedia and it seems like something I would be into. What do you guys think?

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VictoriousOG

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Re: books to read
« Reply #956 on: May 09, 2011, 06:37:37 PM »
Picked this up at the public library.

Decided to give it a shot considering how well I liked The Stranger. Anyone have any recommendations of short novels? I'm not so good with longer considering I only read two chapters, most, at night.

Inanimate Object

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Re: books to read
« Reply #957 on: May 09, 2011, 06:48:42 PM »

Has anyone read American Gods? I browsed through the plot on wikipedia and it seems like something I would be into. What do you guys think?


If the plot appeals to you, then definitely check it out. I remember being pretty into it when I read it.

sven thorkel

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Re: books to read
« Reply #958 on: May 09, 2011, 10:41:43 PM »
^Will do.

Anyone have any recommendations of short novels? I'm not so good with longer considering I only read two chapters, most, at night.

I like to intersperse short books between long ones. Check out: The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy (and the rest of the five part trilogy [although I've only made it to the third so far]), The Old Man and the Sea, most Vonnegut books, The Crying of Lot 49, Animal Farm, Siddhartha, Fight Club, and The Time Machine. I don't know what your criteria is for short novels, but those all were pretty quick reads. 

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I don't know where you get your facts. The first generation of My Little Ponies were made by Hasbro, not the Khmer Rouge. And Hasbro hasn't made toys out of human skulls since the 1960's.

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VictoriousOG

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Re: books to read
« Reply #959 on: May 10, 2011, 05:46:53 AM »
Thanks, I've read some of those, but ill look at the others. Really bummed on my public library not having any Bukowski novels, just books of his poems.