Author Topic: books to read  (Read 247027 times)

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sametelt

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1050 on: August 15, 2011, 02:49:45 PM »
Just got this in the mail


Pippen

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1051 on: August 15, 2011, 04:24:14 PM »

really good

and about to start:

sven thorkel

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1052 on: August 15, 2011, 07:10:11 PM »
^ Just to warn you, it takes perseverance. A lot of my free time was shed on that book, but in the end, it was worth it.
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sametelt

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1053 on: August 16, 2011, 03:25:44 AM »
^ Just to warn you, it takes perseverance. A lot of my free time was shed on that book, but in the end, it was worth it.

Best novel I've ever read. If you stick through it will blow your mind.

Greg Ostertag

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1054 on: August 16, 2011, 09:41:06 AM »
I think it was written out of vanity and with no heart, but I didn't finish it so my opinion is void. Guy was brilliant.
Cold Ghengis

Monty Burns

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1055 on: August 16, 2011, 10:41:23 AM »
been reading    "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by  Ernest Hemingway . I usualy like Hemingway , but I find the book abit hmmmmm .
Some of the parts are really sick and great . others are abit long winded and boring to be honest . but its a good book and almost done with it

Hemingway is sick

Inanimate Object

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1056 on: August 17, 2011, 05:52:52 PM »
Just finishing:

sametelt

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1057 on: August 18, 2011, 03:44:59 PM »
I think it was written out of vanity and with no heart, but I didn't finish it so my opinion is void. Guy was brilliant.

Infinite Jest? Care to elaborate?

Ernie McCracken

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1058 on: August 20, 2011, 08:34:25 PM »


Even if you are not the biggest Rolling Stones fan I would still recommend Keith's autobiography, but if you like the stones, the 60s, 70s, rock history, and crazy stories then this is a must read.  Great stuff, I kept a pen and paper close by because he mentions so much good music I never heard of and I had to jot it down.

svilleantigo

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1059 on: August 20, 2011, 09:05:14 PM »
Just finished "Disco Bloodbath" by James St. James, the book that later got adapted into the movie Party Monster. Highly recommend it.. it's about 300 pages, interesting, funny, pretty light reading.. I buzzed through it in a couple days.

thepman

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1060 on: August 21, 2011, 07:13:47 AM »
haven't read it since I was younger, so decided to re-read it before the film comes out:

« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 07:16:04 AM by thepman »
skating is all about choosing your outfit very deliberately, going out in public. looking super sick. and then riding your board a little bit

Buddy G

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1061 on: August 21, 2011, 07:22:34 AM »
just finished this



which was pretty good and started this today:


brycickle

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1062 on: August 22, 2011, 12:16:27 AM »
I've got mixed feelings about Hitchens.

 You and the D00D have turned this thread into a horrible head-on-collision between a short bus full of retarded kids and a van full of paraplegics.



Buddy G

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1063 on: August 22, 2011, 11:23:48 AM »
I've got mixed feelings about Hitchens.

yeah same, the book's an interesting read but i wouldn't say it made me like him any more than i did, which was a bit.

he likes himself a lot though, so it's probably ok.

Poele

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1064 on: August 23, 2011, 06:51:17 AM »

ciaran

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1065 on: August 23, 2011, 02:26:00 PM »
Reading/getting constantly stumped by this at the moment.  Heavy going - string theory isn't easy to get yer head around.


Sarah Jessica ParkFootage

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1066 on: August 23, 2011, 02:45:38 PM »

Just finished this. Its unpleasant and pretty archaic but ultimately highly rewarding.
I've considered taking the plunge into Ultimate Jest but I dont think I have the patience, til i've honed my brain into a focused reading machine I'm working my way through DFWs essays and short stories.

sven thorkel

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1067 on: August 30, 2011, 10:09:06 AM »


Classic Pynchon. Maybe a little easier to follow at times, and a little shorter than his average book, but that's all for the better.
"Front row tickets to a bomb ass play"

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I don't know where you get your facts. The first generation of My Little Ponies were made by Hasbro, not the Khmer Rouge. And Hasbro hasn't made toys out of human skulls since the 1960's.

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Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1068 on: September 04, 2011, 07:12:27 AM »


I'm actually reading this. Back in highschool last may we analized "Eveline" and I was pretty interested in the whole idea of paralisis and ephiphany, definetly blew my mind. However, now that I'm reading it on my own I find it pretty hard to understand, like link the different stories and hidden meanings of the single novels. I'm actually starting "The boarding house", I hope things get clearer, still amazing writing techniques though. Anyone can share his idea on this?

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1069 on: September 04, 2011, 10:48:40 AM »
What do you mean you're having a hard time linking the different stories?

Nosferatu

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1070 on: September 04, 2011, 11:11:16 AM »
It's hard if not impossible to divine all of the "meaning" and "links" of a literary text on your own just by reading it.  I would look up secondary sources on google scholar or jstor or even wikipedia to get a better idea of what's going on.  I read dubliners on my own and surely did not get all of the things you are looking for out of it but I really enjoyed it.
I thought it wasnt just him solo, shouldve stuck with my og thought.
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Smurph

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1071 on: September 04, 2011, 11:16:03 AM »
I'm actually reading this. Back in highschool last may we analized "Eveline" and I was pretty interested in the whole idea of paralisis and ephiphany, definetly blew my mind. However, now that I'm reading it on my own I find it pretty hard to understand, like link the different stories and hidden meanings of the single novels. I'm actually starting "The boarding house", I hope things get clearer, still amazing writing techniques though. Anyone can share his idea on this?

Weirdly this was the last book I read. The stories aren't meant to have any discerning linkage. Sure, the book is a resounding delineation of dublin's characters, but really, there's not meant to be any parallels drawn between the short stories...at least I think anyway.

As for the bold text - what?


Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1072 on: September 04, 2011, 11:41:33 AM »
I'm actually reading this. Back in highschool last may we analized "Eveline" and I was pretty interested in the whole idea of paralisis and ephiphany, definetly blew my mind. However, now that I'm reading it on my own I find it pretty hard to understand, like link the different stories and hidden meanings of the single novels. I'm actually starting "The boarding house", I hope things get clearer, still amazing writing techniques though. Anyone can share his idea on this?

Weirdly this was the last book I read. The stories aren't meant to have any discerning linkage. Sure, the book is a resounding delineation of dublin's characters, but really, there's not meant to be any parallels drawn between the short stories...at least I think anyway.

As for the bold text - what?



Haha yeah, maybe I'm just too curious and I forced myself to see links even though there weren't, my bad. I was looking for further explanation in the following stories, just my fault.
Bold text: paralisis and ephiphany are two of Joyce's main features to express the personalities of people from Ireland and Dublin in general. For what I can remember from what I studied those people hate their state of life and want to escape their reality, but can't because of their weak personality.
E.g. in "Eveline" she wants to live her life abroad with her boyfriend but can't sail with him because she's paralised, like a weak animal, and tortured in her mind with the promise she made to her mother to keep the family together.
One the other hand epiphany is the trivial gesture (somehow similar to the "madeleine" of Proust) that marks the impossibility of the change; it's given by a sound, a memory and whatnot, something absolutely trivial but really important for the character. In Eveline this is given by the sound of an organ or something, that reminds her the night her mother died.

This is just my two cents, really. I hope this helped to understand the bold text.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2011, 11:43:52 AM by Mark Renton »

fulfillthedream

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1073 on: September 04, 2011, 11:46:56 AM »
My cousin got me into this book called Shantaram. Its about an Australian man who is in prison and escapes as a fugitive to India and the book describes his adventures and relationships he develops there. It's a long ass read (i've been on and off with this one for a while between school stuff) but it's written really deep and poetically. It's pretty epic, almost like a long movie. I am kind of glad I have not finished it because this novel is some how still always involved in my life. I think a skateboarder would really dig the adventures and stories in this book.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shantaram_%28novel%29
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[

Smurph

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1074 on: September 04, 2011, 12:04:31 PM »
I'm actually reading this. Back in highschool last may we analized "Eveline" and I was pretty interested in the whole idea of paralisis and ephiphany, definetly blew my mind. However, now that I'm reading it on my own I find it pretty hard to understand, like link the different stories and hidden meanings of the single novels. I'm actually starting "The boarding house", I hope things get clearer, still amazing writing techniques though. Anyone can share his idea on this?

Weirdly this was the last book I read. The stories aren't meant to have any discerning linkage. Sure, the book is a resounding delineation of dublin's characters, but really, there's not meant to be any parallels drawn between the short stories...at least I think anyway.

As for the bold text - what?



Haha yeah, maybe I'm just too curious and I forced myself to see links even though there weren't, my bad. I was looking for further explanation in the following stories, just my fault.
Bold text: paralisis and ephiphany are two of Joyce's main features to express the personalities of people from Ireland and Dublin in general. For what I can remember from what I studied those people hate their state of life and want to escape their reality, but can't because of their weak personality.
E.g. in "Eveline" she wants to live her life abroad with her boyfriend but can't sail with him because she's paralised, like a weak animal, and tortured in her mind with the promise she made to her mother to keep the family together.
One the other hand epiphany is the trivial gesture (somehow similar to the "madeleine" of Proust) that marks the impossibility of the change; it's given by a sound, a memory and whatnot, something absolutely trivial but really important for the character. In Eveline this is given by the sound of an organ or something, that reminds her the night her mother died.

This is just my two cents, really. I hope this helped to understand the bold text.
Wait wait, not being a smartass but Eveline isn't paralysed - her muscles function...are you sure you haven't mixed up your terms? - if you mean "paralysis", it probably must be accompanied by another word or else it doesn't really transpose to literature.

As for "epiphany", in the grand scheme of things, yes, yes this is endemic in many of the stories in the collection.

Edit - just to give you a semi-local insight to the Eveline story... Ireland had inadmissable poverty and hardship and by virtue, emigration was rife. Thing is, with Ireland historically being quite a closed, conservative place; when somebody left, they left for good...and they NEVER returned. Essentially the undertone to many works is the struggle to decide between family, friends, custom, religion and adventure, freedom, liberty, work...

A really prolific example of this is in Brian Friel's - Philadelphia Here I Come...very well recommended.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2011, 02:30:52 PM by Smurph »

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1075 on: September 04, 2011, 12:29:57 PM »
He means paralysis as in inaction. Obviously not physically paralyzed, but perhaps psychically, emotionally, metaphysically--which is a huge aspect of Joyce's novels. An inability of the characters, for whatever reason, to make changes that they know are necessary.

Along with Nietzsche, I'm reading this. Trying to finish both before my classes start.


Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1076 on: September 05, 2011, 03:44:20 AM »
He means paralysis as in inaction. Obviously not physically paralyzed, but perhaps psychically, emotionally, metaphysically--which is a huge aspect of Joyce's novels. An inability of the characters, for whatever reason, to make changes that they know are necessary.

This is what I meant.

Smurph

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1077 on: September 05, 2011, 04:35:02 AM »
He means paralysis as in inaction. Obviously not physically paralyzed, but perhaps psychically, emotionally, metaphysically--which is a huge aspect of Joyce's novels. An inability of the characters, for whatever reason, to make changes that they know are necessary.

This is what I meant.
Cool, I understand...and sorry to be pedantic.

I'm actually reading this now:



It's too early in the book to give a resolute opinion.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2011, 04:37:05 AM by Smurph »

GISM

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1078 on: September 06, 2011, 12:22:35 AM »
Just finished this
Apparently it's a revamped version with extra content to better match the movie... Should've gotten the original. It has a behind the scenes type thing on the process of getting the movie made so that was cool. Watched Blade Runner right after.

Going to start 1984 or The Gangs of New York, the actual historical accounts of what the movie is based on.

happenstance

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1079 on: September 06, 2011, 12:31:08 AM »
If you are interested in the effects American foreign policy has on its citizens then I recommend "Blowback" by Chalmers Johnson. It is an amazing read. I am just finishing up his new book, so if you have read "Blowback" (though it isn't really necessary to read it first, I just think it is a better introduction to Johnson), I would read "Dismantling the Empire." It explores the effects of maintaining the cost of the American Empire and the power of the military industrial complex over American foreign policy.