Author Topic: books to read  (Read 247964 times)

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steve

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1560 on: December 22, 2012, 07:03:16 PM »
I cannot get into GGM. I tried reading one if his short story collections that a friend loaned to me since he talked him up so much and I gave it back after a few stories after I was bored by every story. I also hate the phrase "magical realism." I find it unnecessary.

how else would you frame the genre?
« Last Edit: December 22, 2012, 07:06:46 PM by steve »

Laban Fetus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1561 on: December 23, 2012, 12:24:12 PM »
Demian by Herman Hesse. This one really hits home on a number of occasions.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1562 on: December 23, 2012, 01:45:39 PM »
I cannot get into GGM. I tried reading one if his short story collections that a friend loaned to me since he talked him up so much and I gave it back after a few stories after I was bored by every story. I also hate the phrase "magical realism." I find it unnecessary.

how else would you frame the genre?

Well, it really is just a postmodern fantastic literature, isn't it? I mean, "The Metamorphosis" and parts of Ulysses (and maybe even Finnegans Wake) have "magic realism" elements, but aren't classically thought of with that genre. And yes, they are differences between GGM and Kafka or Joyce, but ultimately that does not seem to warrant a new genre. Just because you create a world/novel in which different/magic/fantastical rules are commonplace means nothing. It just seems like a more "academic" or "critical" way to say "fantasy literature."

Harem

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1563 on: December 31, 2012, 09:33:09 PM »
Just read my first book for 2013 in a couple of hours - Post Office by Charles Bukowski. Engaged enough interest to follow up on more of his works. But where to go from here?



BRIX SKWIKZ

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1564 on: December 31, 2012, 10:19:38 PM »
READ THE LAST ONE NOW ;)

BRIX SKWIKZ

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1565 on: December 31, 2012, 10:24:17 PM »
THE CAPTAIN IS OUT TO LUNCH
O READ THEM ALL
 :)

kilgore.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1566 on: January 01, 2013, 12:16:00 AM »
Just read my first book for 2013 in a couple of hours - Post Office by Charles Bukowski. Engaged enough interest to follow up on more of his works. But where to go from here?
i'm guessing you're in high school. just go, grab it all.

trust.
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then its straight to your kids' school, wine coolers in the Prius

Generik

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1567 on: January 01, 2013, 12:02:11 PM »


Just finished this book the other day and it got me stoked to eat some mushrooms, so I got truffles last night and watched fireworks with Satan then blacked out and woke up with a big ass gash in my head.
Ⓐ☭Ⓐ☭Ⓐ

Tha J-train

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1568 on: January 01, 2013, 12:28:55 PM »
Reading a book called How much is enough? Money and the good life

by a father son economist/philosopher team Robert and Edward Skidelsky.

Completely engrossing.  I'd also recommend shop class as soul craft, reefer madness, confessions of an economic hit man (read with a grain of salt), and the quest (if you can handle economics).  Next on my list is soul of a tree by george nakashima.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1569 on: January 01, 2013, 01:24:35 PM »
Finished my two Georges Bataille related books and started The Outsourced Self by Arlie Russell Hochschild last night. I'm kind of nervous because she seems to be walking a fine line between academic and pop sociology. Hopefully it turns out alright.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1570 on: January 01, 2013, 01:26:31 PM »
Finished my two Georges Bataille related books and started The Outsourced Self by Arlie Russell Hochschild last night. I'm kind of nervous because she seems to be walking a fine line between academic and pop sociology. Hopefully it turns out alright.

Georges Bataille is excellent. 

Just picked up Cormac McCarthy's Child of God and Jim Thompson's The Killer Inside Me.

kellen

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1571 on: January 01, 2013, 02:12:09 PM »
just finished these:





gonna start this tonight:


oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1572 on: January 01, 2013, 02:28:13 PM »
Finished my two Georges Bataille related books and started The Outsourced Self by Arlie Russell Hochschild last night. I'm kind of nervous because she seems to be walking a fine line between academic and pop sociology. Hopefully it turns out alright.

Georges Bataille is excellent. 

Just picked up Cormac McCarthy's Child of God and Jim Thompson's The Killer Inside Me.

If you like Bataille, you should read the biography by Michel Surya that I've been mentioning. It's long but provides amazing insight into his works, not only the inspiration behind them but also an analysis and explanation of them.

BRIX SKWIKZ

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1573 on: January 01, 2013, 03:23:57 PM »
MAUS  :o

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1574 on: January 03, 2013, 09:53:21 PM »
Already finished that Hochschild book. It was not as academic/analytical as I had hoped. A quick and interesting read and it definitely gave me some things to think about, but still.

Starting Speak, Memory by Nabokov tomorrow. I'm trying to read at least a chapter of a book a day this year for one of my resolutions.

kilgore.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1575 on: January 03, 2013, 10:25:30 PM »


No holds barred, til labias say "free us"
then its straight to your kids' school, wine coolers in the Prius

Lenny the Fatface

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1576 on: January 04, 2013, 06:58:50 AM »
I currently reading this on the iPad.




And yes, this book pretty much panders to the "tongue in cheek, 20 something, middle class, college educated, black interests but only has white friends/ white interests but only has black friends, think the boondocks in funnier than it really is, cool twitter profile picture having" type of black folk that you might have already assumed.

HATE!

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1577 on: January 06, 2013, 07:50:10 PM »
There's been more talk on Instagram and Facebook about a Slap Book Club.... 

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1578 on: January 07, 2013, 06:51:00 AM »
There's been more talk on Instagram and Facebook about a Slap Book Club....? 

I have too many classics to cover still, I got into reading quite late.  This thread is gold though and I'm always interested to get more recomendations so if a book club is going to make this thread more active, get to it.

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1579 on: January 08, 2013, 07:36:33 AM »
Speaking of which, I was thinking about picking up Ulysses soon and wanted to hear some thoughts about getting the annotated book by Gifford as well or should I try to get through it without it?

HATE!

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1580 on: January 08, 2013, 07:58:18 AM »
I've actually never read it myself.  If we start a book club- is anyone else interested?  Any ideas for first books?  It's Slap, so I'm guessing plenty of boobs and violence.

ChronicBluntSlider

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1581 on: January 08, 2013, 08:59:00 AM »


Awesome book. Usually not into historical fiction, but have been reading some stuff about the Roman Empire, and this was really interesting. Caligula was such a psychopath. Starting Midnight's Children by Rushdie today.

As for the book club, Crying of Lot 49 was chosen and hardly anybody read it. Maybe pick a similarly short, but easier read of a book for the next one.

HATE!

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1582 on: January 08, 2013, 09:17:55 AM »
Damn, I didn't even know we actually had one in the past.  I thought it had only been suggested.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1583 on: January 08, 2013, 09:28:47 AM »
Currently finishing up this novel: 



It is the sequel to this novel, but you don't need to read them in order:



I am really enjoying it, so I thought I would post it.  It is scary, funny, and intelligently written all at the same time.  I am going to get John Dies at the End when it comes into my public Lib.  Super excited to read it.  Nonetheless, I would recommend This Book is Full of Spiders to anyone.  Couldn't put it down once I started.  Def check it out.

Also, with regard to this thread, I read some of the funnies posted and I thoroughly enjoyed the following:  What's Not to Love By Jonathan Ames,  Kasher in the Rye By Moshe Kasher,  and Not Taco Bell Material by Adam Corolla.  If anyone is looking for some fucking hilarious, yet intelligent reads; these are the ones.  Simply amazing. 


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oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1584 on: January 08, 2013, 09:32:56 AM »
Speaking of which, I was thinking about picking up Ulysses soon and wanted to hear some thoughts about getting the annotated book by Gifford as well or should I try to get through it without it?

I've read Ulysses three times now and the Gifford annotations are really helpful. It is entirely possible to get through it without the annotations (I did for my first two times), but the annotations provide a lot of historical, geographical, and linguistic context (i.e. slang and the occasional translation). It provides little to no analytical work, so you still have to do all of that, but it will increase your comprehension of the text making analysis easier. I'd definitely recommend it. It's super thorough so what I did when I used it was just glance at it whenever I came across a confusing plot point or term.

One thing to be aware of is that the Gifford annotations are numbered for a specific printing of the book since Ulysses has a really odd publication history. I used the annotations while reading the hardcover "Modern Library" edition and I'm of the ilk strongly advising you to stay away from the Gabler edition (and supposedly there's a "Reader's Edition" of Ulysses that's just horrendous EDIT: Found out why. It was edited by Danis Rose and you should avoid any editions of Joyce that he has had a hand in). Gabler was released by the Joyce Estate after his edition came out and hundreds of errors were described line-by-line by critics. I honestly don't know why people still have it in circulation.

Sorry for all of the info. I just really like Joyce. Feel free to PM me once you start if you want to talk about it although it's been about 2 years since the last time I read it.

As for the book club, I was actually going to resuggest The Crying of Lot 49 since it's on my personal list and didn't work out too well last time.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2013, 09:46:51 AM by oyolar »

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1585 on: January 08, 2013, 09:46:55 AM »
Speaking of which, I was thinking about picking up Ulysses soon and wanted to hear some thoughts about getting the annotated book by Gifford as well or should I try to get through it without it?

I've read Ulysses three times now and the Gifford annotations are really helpful. It is entirely possible to get through it without the annotations (I did for my first two times), but the annotations provide a lot of historical, geographical, and linguistic context (i.e. slang and the occasional translation). It provides little to no analytical work, so you still have to do all of that, but it will increase your comprehension of the text making analysis easier. I'd definitely recommend it. It's super thorough so what I did when I used it was just glance at it whenever I came across a confusing plot point or term.

One thing to be aware of is that the Gifford annotations are numbered for a specific printing of the book since Ulysses has a really odd publication history. I used the annotations while reading the hardcover "Modern Library" edition and I'm of the ilk strongly advising you to stay away from the Gabler edition (and supposedly there's a "Reader's Edition" of Ulysses that's just horrendous EDIT: Found out why. It was edited by Danis Rose and you should avoid any editions of Joyce that he has had a hand in). Gabler was released by the Joyce Estate after his edition came out and hundreds of errors were described line-by-line by critics. I honestly don't know why people still have it in circulation.

Sorry for all of the info. I just really like Joyce. Feel free to PM me once you start if you want to talk about it although it's been about 2 years since the last time I read it.

As fr the book club, I was actually going to resuggest The Crying of Lot 49 since it's on my personal list and didn't work out too well last time.

Thanks.

dolphinstyle.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1586 on: January 08, 2013, 01:20:17 PM »
there's a little slap pals book club on goodreads.com
kilgore initiated it, I think
however, nothing has happened on there yet, although it was formed like a year ago
http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/64583-slap-pals
maybe more will join and get it actually started?
Look, I'm an individual within us, partaking in this business

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1588 on: January 10, 2013, 03:01:55 PM »
Just finished this:



And it was fucking amazing.  Literally one of the most disturbing and dark books I have ever read.  It resonated with me like a parasite infecting a human host.  I still can't stop thinking about it.  It was dark, witty, and interesting all at once.  Fucking phenomenal.  Also, the author, Gillian Flynn, is pretty fucking hot.  Which makes it even more interesting.  I don't know why, it just does.  Read it and you will udnerstand.  If you like dark literature, then I recommend you read this.   ;D


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cringe.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1589 on: January 31, 2013, 05:36:22 PM »
been on a bit of a binge since christmas, been getting into short story cycles especially

so good, one of my favourite books ive read probably. if you've read/liked in our time by hemingway you should read this... or read it anyway. really awesome series of interconnecting stories/vignettes about people in this town and their hopes, unrealised desires, etc


one of my fav steinbeck books ive read, quite unlike a lot of his other stuff too, formally cool again. similar concept to winesburg ohio except is around the pastures of heaven, a valley in cali. thematically similar too. some really great stories in here that have stuck in my memory


collection of short stories, vignettes, prose poems, poems that concentrate on black people and the north south usa difference. really vivid imagery and feeling, really formally unlike anything ive read


just started this too, again a short story cycle focussing on isolation/decay in lives of ppl in fishing villages along the maine coast



so awesome, joyce is just a serously good writer. if anyone is interested i would say it would be really cool to read dubliners, then portrait, then ulysses in that order because you'll notice lots of interesting continuities, thematic linkages and stylistic/formal/experimental changes through them


had to read this for uni and its a damn long book but its damn good, probably best victorian novel ive read. george eliot was just a super intelligent perceptive badass, damn


also read Ethan Frome the other week cos id never actually read any Wharton and i thought it was a rad lil novellla, pretty sad/intense