Author Topic: books to read  (Read 247167 times)

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kilgore.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1740 on: May 05, 2013, 04:16:12 PM »
No holds barred, til labias say "free us"
then its straight to your kids' school, wine coolers in the Prius

steve

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1741 on: May 05, 2013, 06:25:00 PM »
I've just finished the Miles Davis autobiography, pretty much presents itself as a character study of one 20th century music's most influential figures, and really digs in and talks about what the jazz scene was really like in the 1940s-50s.

Getting through Homage to Catalonia, enjoying the historical/political context of it, Orwell had that perfect mix of concise yet perfectly descriptive writing, especially when he was on the ground living through what he wrote (before 'Homage...' I had finished 'Down and Out..", and thoroughly enjoyed it).

I would love to pick up 'Infinite Jest' again, it has grabbed me with the small amount I have got through. Wallace wrote with such heart, and a kind of hopeless/paranoid humour.
I need the short-snappy books of late, too attention-deprived to battle it at the moment.

I just finished a book by LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka called Black Music. It's a collection of essay/articles he wrote about the Jazz scene during the 50s and 60s. It's a pretty good read. Redundant at times but worth reading.

Beer Keg Peg Leg

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1742 on: May 05, 2013, 08:00:08 PM »


borges is my bro-ges-. I've only read the labyrinths collection, it was sick. i should pick up some more of his stuff.

UgolinoTheSignificant

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1743 on: May 05, 2013, 08:10:07 PM »


borges is my bro-ges-. I've only read the labyrinths collection, it was sick. i should pick up some more of his stuff.

borges is a fucking boss i would definitely recommend giving this a listen if you like him:

http://www.openculture.com/2012/05/jorge_luis_borges_1967-8_norton_lectures_on_poetry_and_everything_else_literary.html
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Chinaskis underpants

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1744 on: May 06, 2013, 12:05:03 AM »


borges is my bro-ges-. I've only read the labyrinths collection, it was sick. i should pick up some more of his stuff.

borges is a fucking boss i would definitely recommend giving this a listen if you like him:

http://www.openculture.com/2012/05/jorge_luis_borges_1967-8_norton_lectures_on_poetry_and_everything_else_literary.html

I've heard a little about Borges, and am interested in reading some stuff, he was Argentinian, right?

Where does he fit in, what did he write about, what's a good start?

Mooley

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1745 on: May 06, 2013, 12:12:54 PM »
Best place to start is probably either Ficciones or A Universal History of Infamy. All his stuff is just collected short stories for the most part. If you're into the whole Magical Realism movement he's one of the real forefathers of it. I've always been a particular fan of the story Funes el memorioso in Ficciones.

But if you check his stuff out and you're into it, give Julio Cortazar a shot. A lot of his short stories are amazing.



I've never read any Murakami stuff but I just picked up The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle the other day, pretty stoked to get started with that.

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1746 on: May 06, 2013, 01:03:53 PM »
Is there a book that explains everything?  Google searches are fruitless.  If I don't find answers soon I'm going to join a cult.  A sweet cult.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1747 on: May 07, 2013, 09:59:49 AM »
Just started this in an attempt to workout my horrible memory problems. In turn, I ended up reading a great story and getting tips in the process. I know I'm probably making it sound like more of a self help book than it actually is but it's a good read. A little slow at first but after the first two chapters, it starts to pick up. Plus, the stories he references in order to explain how to unlock the true potential of memorizing are insanely interesting.



"Moonwalking with Einstein follows Joshua Foer's compelling journey as a participant in the U.S. Memory Championship. As a science journalist covering the competition, Foer became captivated by the secrets of the competitors, like how the current world memory champion, Ben Pridmore, could memorize the exact order of 1,528 digits in an hour. He met with individuals whose memories are truly unique?from one man whose memory only extends back to his most recent thought, to another who can memorize complex mathematical formulas without knowing any math. Brains remember visual imagery but have a harder time with other information, like lists, and so with the help of experts, Foer learned how to transform the kinds of memories he forgot into the kind his brain remembered naturally. The techniques he mastered made it easier to remember information, and Foer's story demonstrates that the tricks of the masters are accessible to anyone."

via

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1748 on: May 07, 2013, 10:34:44 AM »
Best place to start is probably either Ficciones or A Universal History of Infamy. All his stuff is just collected short stories for the most part. If you're into the whole Magical Realism movement he's one of the real forefathers of it. I've always been a particular fan of the story Funes el memorioso in Ficciones.

But if you check his stuff out and you're into it, give Julio Cortazar a shot. A lot of his short stories are amazing.



I've never read any Murakami stuff but I just picked up The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle the other day, pretty stoked to get started with that.

Wind Up Bird was great, but the last little bit was kind of tough to get through.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1749 on: May 12, 2013, 08:19:51 PM »

Ollie Ringwald

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1750 on: May 13, 2013, 12:41:31 PM »


I'm about halfway through this and it's pretty good if hard work at times.

steve

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1751 on: May 13, 2013, 12:53:52 PM »
Best place to start is probably either Ficciones or A Universal History of Infamy. All his stuff is just collected short stories for the most part. If you're into the whole Magical Realism movement he's one of the real forefathers of it. I've always been a particular fan of the story Funes el memorioso in Ficciones.

But if you check his stuff out and you're into it, give Julio Cortazar a shot. A lot of his short stories are amazing.



I've never read any Murakami stuff but I just picked up The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle the other day, pretty stoked to get started with that.

Wind Up Bird was great, but the last little bit was kind of tough to get through.

I sat and read Kafka on the Shore in entirety this past saturday. What a good story. I borrowed Wind Up Bird to start tonight.

Chinaskis underpants

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1752 on: May 14, 2013, 05:11:23 AM »
The only stuff of Murakami I've touched is Kafka on the Shore. It didn't click, the strangeness within it just came off as contrived.

I don't know if it makes any sense to compare the two, but I feel 'Everything is Illuminated' by Safran-Foer came off much better. Both being contemporary writers, and dealing with plots stuck in the present, historical and fantastical.

And I think The Master and Margherita kicks the shit out of both.

Beer Keg Peg Leg

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1753 on: May 14, 2013, 05:30:08 AM »
making a note to myself to never read anything you contribute to this thread ever again

witty pseudonym

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1754 on: May 14, 2013, 05:38:53 AM »
Just started this in an attempt to workout my horrible memory problems. In turn, I ended up reading a great story and getting tips in the process. I know I'm probably making it sound like more of a self help book than it actually is but it's a good read. A little slow at first but after the first two chapters, it starts to pick up. Plus, the stories he references in order to explain how to unlock the true potential of memorizing are insanely interesting.



"Moonwalking with Einstein follows Joshua Foer's compelling journey as a participant in the U.S. Memory Championship. As a science journalist covering the competition, Foer became captivated by the secrets of the competitors, like how the current world memory champion, Ben Pridmore, could memorize the exact order of 1,528 digits in an hour. He met with individuals whose memories are truly unique?from one man whose memory only extends back to his most recent thought, to another who can memorize complex mathematical formulas without knowing any math. Brains remember visual imagery but have a harder time with other information, like lists, and so with the help of experts, Foer learned how to transform the kinds of memories he forgot into the kind his brain remembered naturally. The techniques he mastered made it easier to remember information, and Foer's story demonstrates that the tricks of the masters are accessible to anyone."


I read this about a year ago, it is actually a very interesting and quick read. 

Chinaskis underpants

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1755 on: May 15, 2013, 05:06:04 AM »
making a note to myself to never read anything you contribute to this thread ever again

Care to elaborate?

I don't think what I wrote was too outlandish.

None of those are my favourite writers, I was just comparing similar books to explain why I didn't enjoy one in particular.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1756 on: May 15, 2013, 06:56:20 AM »

One of the funniest books I've read.  Not as funny as Sh*t My Dad Says and his dad isn't in it as much, but some of the author's stories are pretty great.  Pretty good pick me up and quick to finish.  It's fun laughing out loud because of a book.

Yo, just read Shit my Dad Says and I fucking loved it.  It is a great read when you want to take break from serious novels.  Shit was so entertaining.  Read it in about 3 hours at work.  About to pick up I Suck at Girls.  Thanks for the recommendation mah dude!   ;D ;D


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ChronicBluntSlider

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1757 on: May 15, 2013, 01:11:18 PM »


And bought Ficciones on the thread's recommendation. Will be reading that next.

steve

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1758 on: May 15, 2013, 01:16:16 PM »
The only stuff of Murakami I've touched is Kafka on the Shore. It didn't click, the strangeness within it just came off as contrived.

I don't know if it makes any sense to compare the two, but I feel 'Everything is Illuminated' by Safran-Foer came off much better. Both being contemporary writers, and dealing with plots stuck in the present, historical and fantastical.

And I think The Master and Margherita kicks the shit out of both.

I completely disagree. I've got to give it another go, but I felt that the novel, Everything is Illuminated, was too pretentious. Why, I'm not sure, it's been years. The film, however, is great. But as far as Murakami being too contrived, I think he digs into the possibility of dreamscape like no other. He's got a beautiful imagination and is comfortable with his intellect to not come off as a dick.

I'm now reading The Wind Up Bird Chronicle and continue to shit my pants in pleasure.

Kinch

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1759 on: May 15, 2013, 01:43:43 PM »
The only stuff of Murakami I've touched is Kafka on the Shore. It didn't click, the strangeness within it just came off as contrived.

I don't know if it makes any sense to compare the two, but I feel 'Everything is Illuminated' by Safran-Foer came off much better. Both being contemporary writers, and dealing with plots stuck in the present, historical and fantastical.

And I think The Master and Margherita kicks the shit out of both.

I completely disagree. I've got to give it another go, but I felt that the novel, Everything is Illuminated, was too pretentious. Why, I'm not sure, it's been years. The film, however, is great. But as far as Murakami being too contrived, I think he digs into the possibility of dreamscape like no other. He's got a beautiful imagination and is comfortable with his intellect to not come off as a dick.

I'm now reading The Wind Up Bird Chronicle and continue to shit my pants in pleasure.

Would you care to elaborate on this at all? I've had a few people recommend Murakami to me without being able to say much more than 'He's really good man.' but this piques my interest as the Circe chapter in Ulysses is one of my favourite things ever. (sorry about my British-ass spelling)

steve

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1760 on: May 15, 2013, 03:00:11 PM »
The only stuff of Murakami I've touched is Kafka on the Shore. It didn't click, the strangeness within it just came off as contrived.

I don't know if it makes any sense to compare the two, but I feel 'Everything is Illuminated' by Safran-Foer came off much better. Both being contemporary writers, and dealing with plots stuck in the present, historical and fantastical.

And I think The Master and Margherita kicks the shit out of both.

I completely disagree. I've got to give it another go, but I felt that the novel, Everything is Illuminated, was too pretentious. Why, I'm not sure, it's been years. The film, however, is great. But as far as Murakami being too contrived, I think he digs into the possibility of dreamscape like no other. He's got a beautiful imagination and is comfortable with his intellect to not come off as a dick.

I'm now reading The Wind Up Bird Chronicle and continue to shit my pants in pleasure.

Would you care to elaborate on this at all? I've had a few people recommend Murakami to me without being able to say much more than 'He's really good man.' but this piques my interest as the Circe chapter in Ulysses is one of my favourite things ever. (sorry about my British-ass spelling)

the characters are are always, in some way, grounded in the present, of the story that is, but while making a grocery list or biking to the cleaner, might move through states that feel like lucid dreams. Both the reader and protagonist (not always the other characters) are well aware of the bizarre turn of events, but it's safe to say that Murakami crafts these imaginary places so well, that it's a completely surreptitious slide into home, whether in the kitchen of a man who murders cats to steal their souls, watching oneself get raped from a safe physical distance while trapped in a ferris wheel, or just plain dreaming of meeting a 100% perfect mate. It's not just these seemingly strange turns that make the stories great, they're all fairly easy to read while also offering points of thought; Kafka on the Shore isn't named such as a literary cliche. I feel safe saying that his characters aren't so hard to relate to, to empathize with.

Give them a shot!

GeorgeHanson

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1761 on: May 15, 2013, 03:07:48 PM »
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. Its fucking hilarious. I look at it kind of like a modern Candide by Voltaire.

Also Nice Shooting Cowboy by Anson Cameron. A compile of short, fairly twisted stories. Its good.

And anything by Roald Dahl but mainly Skin and Other stories, Going Solo and Boy. All fucking brilliant.

Also, Hells Angels by Hunter S. Fucking great.

Chinaskis underpants

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1762 on: May 15, 2013, 04:43:06 PM »
The only stuff of Murakami I've touched is Kafka on the Shore. It didn't click, the strangeness within it just came off as contrived.

I don't know if it makes any sense to compare the two, but I feel 'Everything is Illuminated' by Safran-Foer came off much better. Both being contemporary writers, and dealing with plots stuck in the present, historical and fantastical.

And I think The Master and Margherita kicks the shit out of both.

I completely disagree. I've got to give it another go, but I felt that the novel, Everything is Illuminated, was too pretentious. Why, I'm not sure, it's been years. The film, however, is great. But as far as Murakami being too contrived, I think he digs into the possibility of dreamscape like no other. He's got a beautiful imagination and is comfortable with his intellect to not come off as a dick.

I'm now reading The Wind Up Bird Chronicle and continue to shit my pants in pleasure.

I guess I was basing my preference on something different, I thought the balance of humour and heavyness in "Everything..." was done particularly well, where 'Kafka..." doesn't focus so much on humour, and just seems more steeped in the strange.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1763 on: May 15, 2013, 05:40:59 PM »
The only stuff of Murakami I've touched is Kafka on the Shore. It didn't click, the strangeness within it just came off as contrived.

I don't know if it makes any sense to compare the two, but I feel 'Everything is Illuminated' by Safran-Foer came off much better. Both being contemporary writers, and dealing with plots stuck in the present, historical and fantastical.

And I think The Master and Margherita kicks the shit out of both.

I completely disagree. I've got to give it another go, but I felt that the novel, Everything is Illuminated, was too pretentious. Why, I'm not sure, it's been years. The film, however, is great. But as far as Murakami being too contrived, I think he digs into the possibility of dreamscape like no other. He's got a beautiful imagination and is comfortable with his intellect to not come off as a dick.

I'm now reading The Wind Up Bird Chronicle and continue to shit my pants in pleasure.

I guess I was basing my preference on something different, I thought the balance of humour and heavyness in "Everything..." was done particularly well, where 'Kafka..." doesn't focus so much on humour, and just seems more steeped in the strange.
I always try to steer new Murakami readers to Hard Boiled Wonderland.  I might just have to reread it after this conversation.
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Re: books to read
« Reply #1764 on: May 15, 2013, 09:58:48 PM »
I've read 1Q84, A Wild Sheep Chase, After Dark, and Norwegian Wood (which admittedly is pretty tame compared to the rest of his stuff), over the past couple months and Murakami pulls of his brand of strange effortlessly.  I have never once thought his dreamy, metaphysical worlds seemed contrived or bizarre solely for the sake of being bizarre. 

tuque

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1765 on: May 15, 2013, 11:30:23 PM »
Lots of stuff posted in the last page or two that I want to check out.  Thanks guys.  I'll have to get a piece of paper and a pen,  write stuff down,  and head to the bookstore tomorrow.  I think I've already mentioned it in this thread but Dance Dance Dance is my favorite Murakami by far.  I'd recommend it for somebody looking to try out his stuff.  Not quite as big of a commitment as The Windup Bird Chronicles or Kafka on The Shore. Summer is right around the corner and I just realized with my open schedule I'll have a ton of time to catch up on leisure reading.  Maybe I'll pick up that Ficciones   


wheee!

Kinch

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1766 on: May 16, 2013, 01:43:46 AM »
the characters are are always, in some way, grounded in the present, of the story that is, but while making a grocery list or biking to the cleaner, might move through states that feel like lucid dreams. Both the reader and protagonist (not always the other characters) are well aware of the bizarre turn of events, but it's safe to say that Murakami crafts these imaginary places so well, that it's a completely surreptitious slide into home, whether in the kitchen of a man who murders cats to steal their souls, watching oneself get raped from a safe physical distance while trapped in a ferris wheel, or just plain dreaming of meeting a 100% perfect mate. It's not just these seemingly strange turns that make the stories great, they're all fairly easy to read while also offering points of thought; Kafka on the Shore isn't named such as a literary cliche. I feel safe saying that his characters aren't so hard to relate to, to empathize with.

Give them a shot!

Thanks for that. He's been bumped up a fair few places in the reading queue for sure.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1767 on: May 16, 2013, 02:53:39 AM »
Currently reading my first french book in ages:



Surprisingly, it's been a fairly easy read so far. I appreciate that the whole piece is an allegory of the Nazi era.

Next up is Capote's "In Cold Blood" for some class at school. From everything I've heard so far, it should be a good read. I'm really looking forward to it.



After that, I'll be reading the following book which sounds really fucking interesting. It's an account of that family who subverted the Nazi regime in its everyday routine.



As one can tell, I'm really interested in fiction which deals with the Nazi era in Germany.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2013, 02:57:22 AM by AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice »

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1768 on: May 16, 2013, 05:22:13 AM »
Just finished The Violent Bear It Away last night.. I'm bringing Gary Alan Fine's Difficult Reputations and Nabokov's The Tragedy of Mister Morn on my NYC trip. The Nabokov is the first translation of an early play he wrote. I hope it's good-I remember hearing he wasn't a great playwright. His style just doesn't lend itself to plays. Hopefully, I'll be able to finish it on my trip since its pretty short and then I'm going to supplement my Flannery O'Connor novel with a biography on her.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1769 on: May 17, 2013, 01:20:28 PM »
Read this:



Really enjoyed it.  Follows the relationship of two college friends.  I don't want to give too much away, but I thought it was quite good.  Easy read, yet captivating.  Couldn't put it down.


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