Author Topic: books to read  (Read 246857 times)

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sametelt

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1830 on: July 25, 2013, 01:19:03 AM »


Currently reading this. It's alright, but I'm already kind of bored with it. Figured it was worth checking if the hype was warranted. About to move on to



stab

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1831 on: July 25, 2013, 05:22:24 AM »
Was never really into reading but I dunno if I can handle the heat this summer, so I'll be reading a lot more.

halfway through this:


Picked these two up:


I read post office a looooong time ago and loved it, but never found the time to read bukowski's other stuff.  

edit:  I enjoy books with humor in it, but overall melancholy (sorta like post office).  Any good recommendations?



I just finished 1Q84 a few months back.  Murakami's writing style is excellent, though I'm not sure how close the translation into English is from the original Japanese.  His characters are wonderfully realized, their thoughts are almost your own.  My only critique is in the narrative of the stories themselves.  This book doesn't end with the final page.  You sort of sit there and wonder about everything for weeks after reading, feeling almost cheated, but in a good way.  Hard to explain.  I'm actually reading another of his works, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles, which thus far is much darker but equally tense in sexual strangeness.  Good stuff.

Reading Murakami leaves me feeling so melancholy and confused.  His books are obviously artfully crafted but I feel like it has to be something lost in translation that leaves me so confused.

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oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1832 on: July 25, 2013, 06:21:29 AM »


Currently reading this. It's alright, but I'm already kind of bored with it. Figured it was worth checking if the hype was warranted. About to move on to




Are you currently reading Pale Fire?  It gets really interesting once you start reading the footnotes and really going through it.  The index fucks you up too.  The first time I read it, I though it was good and clever, but still pretty straightforward.  It's not until the second or third reading and a little bit of digging/research that you start realizing how difficult and messed up it is.  It's kind of like that old iceberg adage.

mattofallmatts

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1833 on: July 25, 2013, 01:19:31 PM »
Was never really into reading but I dunno if I can handle the heat this summer, so I'll be reading a lot more.

halfway through this:


Picked these two up:


I read post office a looooong time ago and loved it, but never found the time to read bukowski's other stuff. ? 

edit:?  I enjoy books with humor in it, but overall melancholy (sorta like post office).?  Any good recommendations?



I just finished 1Q84 a few months back.?  Murakami's writing style is excellent, though I'm not sure how close the translation into English is from the original Japanese.?  His characters are wonderfully realized, their thoughts are almost your own.?  My only critique is in the narrative of the stories themselves.?  This book doesn't end with the final page.?  You sort of sit there and wonder about everything for weeks after reading, feeling almost cheated, but in a good way.?  Hard to explain.?  I'm actually reading another of his works, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles, which thus far is much darker but equally tense in sexual strangeness.?  Good stuff.

Reading Murakami leaves me feeling so melancholy and confused.  His books are obviously artfully crafted but I feel like it has to be something lost in translation that leaves me so confused.

Exactly, still really fun to read though. So much is based deep in Japanese culture/history/mythology/psychology.
I read this and gave it to my girlfriend.

She was bummed haahahahaha. The stories are all pretty depressing.


Just finished this,


So dang good.

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1834 on: July 25, 2013, 02:52:51 PM »
I had Ulysses in my hand the other day ready to buy it but I chickened out.  I have a pile of books I already bought that I haven't started yet.  One day....

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1835 on: July 25, 2013, 03:12:18 PM »
You're in Chicago, right?  If you get Ulysses, we can totally meet up for coffee dates an I can bring my notebooks and study guides on it and talk for hours about it.

Kinch

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1836 on: July 25, 2013, 04:17:34 PM »
I had Ulysses in my hand the other day ready to buy it but I chickened out.  I have a pile of books I already bought that I haven't started yet.  One day....

It's well worth the investment. If you do decide to go for it I strongly recommend getting a good annotated edition, especially if you're not familiar with the historical context. I started out with a copy of just the text of the novel and found it very difficult to get going with, having the annotations makes reading/understanding it a lot easier.

Also whilst it is a difficult book at first it does get easier and a lot more enjoyable as you persevere with it and your understanding of it grows. My copy now lives in my bathroom and is picked up at a random spot whenever I'm in there for any length of time; I never thought that would be possible while I was reading it for the first time. I was in a class of 15 people for the course I read Ulysses for. Of those 15 easily less than half actually got past the first chapter and just read whichever parts they had to do assignments on. On the flip side pretty much everyone that persevered with it at least up until Bloom enters seemed to absolutely love it.   

It's easily the most rewarding reading project I have ever undertaken simply because there is so much to it. Reading around the circumstances the novel came to be written and published in was also really interesting. James Joyce by Richard Ellmann was pretty informative on many aspects of Joyce's life and their relevance to the novel.

Sorry for ranting on this but it's a fascinating book and would probably be my favourite if I had to pick just one (hence my username). In short be prepared to give it a lot of time and it will be very rewarding. Also enjoy your coffee/study dates with Oyolar  :)

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1837 on: July 25, 2013, 08:12:52 PM »
 ;)

sametelt

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1838 on: July 25, 2013, 11:44:31 PM »
Are you currently reading Pale Fire?  It gets really interesting once you start reading the footnotes and really going through it.  The index fucks you up too.  The first time I read it, I though it was good and clever, but still pretty straightforward.  It's not until the second or third reading and a little bit of digging/research that you start realizing how difficult and messed up it is.  It's kind of like that old iceberg adage.

No, I'll start reading it when I finish A.M Homes. Really looking forward to it.

mattofallmatts

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1839 on: July 26, 2013, 01:20:54 AM »
I had Ulysses in my hand the other day ready to buy it but I chickened out.  I have a pile of books I already bought that I haven't started yet.  One day....

It's well worth the investment. If you do decide to go for it I strongly recommend getting a good annotated edition, especially if you're not familiar with the historical context. I started out with a copy of just the text of the novel and found it very difficult to get going with, having the annotations makes reading/understanding it a lot easier.

Also whilst it is a difficult book at first it does get easier and a lot more enjoyable as you persevere with it and your understanding of it grows. My copy now lives in my bathroom and is picked up at a random spot whenever I'm in there for any length of time; I never thought that would be possible while I was reading it for the first time. I was in a class of 15 people for the course I read Ulysses for. Of those 15 easily less than half actually got past the first chapter and just read whichever parts they had to do assignments on. On the flip side pretty much everyone that persevered with it at least up until Bloom enters seemed to absolutely love it.   

It's easily the most rewarding reading project I have ever undertaken simply because there is so much to it. Reading around the circumstances the novel came to be written and published in was also really interesting. James Joyce by Richard Ellmann was pretty informative on many aspects of Joyce's life and their relevance to the novel.

Sorry for ranting on this but it's a fascinating book and would probably be my favourite if I had to pick just one (hence my username). In short be prepared to give it a lot of time and it will be very rewarding. Also enjoy your coffee/study dates with Oyolar  :)

Yeah I tried to crack into it a few years back and put it down because shit was just zooming over my head. I kept telling myself I would take a lit class in college that went into it but I never did it. Might just need to find a good annotated version. Same thing happened to me when I decided to try and read Dante's Inferno when I was 16.

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1840 on: July 26, 2013, 06:40:41 AM »
Sounds good oyolar.  Maybe when it starts to get cold out.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1841 on: July 26, 2013, 08:06:37 AM »
I've mentioned this before, but for annotations to Ulysses, DON'T buy an annotated edition.  I have yet to see one that does a good job because there are so many things to note.  This is my personal recommendation: http://www.amazon.com/Ulysses-Annotated-Notes-James-Joyces/dp/0520253973 .  It does exactly what annotations should do--explain historical, political, linguistic, social, etc. context with little to no summarizing or analysis.  If you want something more summary and slight analysis focused, use this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0415138582/ref=aw_1st_sims_2?pi=SL500_SY115.

To brag slightly, but also reassure you that I know what I'm talking about, I've read Ulysses three times in a span of four years.  Once was by myself and the other two were for two different classes.  The first time was a struggle, but I wanted to get out of it whatever I could with little to know help and personal research.  The second time was a wash.  The third time, I used those two guides and it seriously felt like I was reading a completely different book.  I cannot recommend them enough.

An one last note--don't buy the Gabler edition.  He added a lot of his own edits to the book.  I recommend the Vintage editions.  My go to test is to check the end of Episode 17.  If there's a big dot after the last question, it's usually a good edition.

EDIT: Actually fixed it this time.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 05:04:40 PM by oyolar »

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1842 on: July 26, 2013, 08:26:05 AM »
First link is broke.

Kinch

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1843 on: July 26, 2013, 09:11:03 AM »
I've mentioned this before, but for annotations to Ulysses, DON'T buy an annotated edition.  I have yet to see one that does a good job because there are so many things to note.  This is my personal recommendation: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0520253973. It does exactly what annotations should do--explain historical, political, linguistic, social, etc. context with little to no summarizing or analysis.  If you want something more summary and slight analysis focused, use this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0415138582/ref=aw_1st_sims_2?pi=SL500_SY115.

To brag slightly, but also reassure you that I know hat I'm talking about, I've read Ulysses three times in a span of four years.  Once was by myself and the other two were for two different classes.  The first time was a struggle, but I wanted to get out of it whatever I could with little to know help and personal research.  The second time was a wash.  The third time, I used those two guides and it seriously felt like I was reading a completely different book.  I cannot recommend them enough.

An one last note--don't buy the Gabler edition.  He added a lot of his own edits to the book.  I recommend the Vintage editions.  My go to test is to check the end of Episode 17.  If there's a big dot after the last question, it's usually a good edition.

I know what you mean, annotated editions can't cover everything and also do sometimes feature some very questionable analysis. I just think they can be a lot of help in starting to read Ulysses as they are generally pitched at someone coming to the novel completely fresh. My edition did have chapter summaries which I would agree should be ignored, they always just seem a bit too much like sparknotes or something else like that. However it did also have annotations specifically by line and page numbers which were mostly concise explanations of whatever Joyce happened to be alluding to in the line in question which were very useful.

Never come across those guides before, I may well have to check those out soon.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1844 on: July 26, 2013, 09:18:37 AM »
Yeah, don't get me wrong--they're definitely helpful and better than nothing, but I like a lot of information so that I can pull what I want out of it and ignore what I don't which is what that Gifford book gives you.  Once you open that up, you realize that there is way too much going on to settle for a small section in the back of the novel.  I mean, the annotations are thicker than some editions of Ulysses!  It's just my preference though, but it was so helpful to me that I can't help but mention it.

Kinch

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1845 on: July 26, 2013, 09:50:03 AM »
Yeah, don't get me wrong--they're definitely helpful and better than nothing, but I like a lot of information so that I can pull what I want out of it and ignore what I don't which is what that Gifford book gives you.  Once you open that up, you realize that there is way too much going on to settle for a small section in the back of the novel.  I mean, the annotations are thicker than some editions of Ulysses!  It's just my preference though, but it was so helpful to me that I can't help but mention it.

For sure. In my copy the annotations took up way over half of what the text took up and couldn't do it justice.

Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1846 on: July 26, 2013, 04:09:23 PM »
I just picked up Nausea by Sarte, anyone else read it?

Yes. In my eyes it is completely overrated.

I've never been a huge fan of Sartre. Or Simone de Beauvoir for that matter. Camus is by far the most (read: the only) exciting writer of the "French Existentialists".

However, in all fairness, people have tried to imitate Sartre for so long that his style seems really bland, played out, unoriginal, and boring nowadays. He's like the modern hipster of the 1950/1960s.

I'm going to pick up 'The stranger' tomorrow since I'll have a whole week at the beach doing nothing..I hope this is going to be exciting/inspiring

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1847 on: July 26, 2013, 05:07:05 PM »
Just finished Consider the Lobster by DFW and now I'm reading Defacement by Michael Taussig.  I try to intersperse some academia between novels, but I have no idea how I feel about this one yet.  It seems rather disjointed, but it might be too early to tell.

HyperBeam

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1848 on: July 26, 2013, 05:42:58 PM »
could someone briefly explain why I ought to read ulysses? it seems overhyped.

BRIX SKWIKZ

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1849 on: July 26, 2013, 06:49:48 PM »
I just picked up Nausea by Sarte, anyone else read it?

Yes. In my eyes it is completely overrated.

I've never been a huge fan of Sartre. Or Simone de Beauvoir for that matter. Camus is by far the most (read: the only) exciting writer of the "French Existentialists".

However, in all fairness, people have tried to imitate Sartre for so long that his style seems really bland, played out, unoriginal, and boring nowadays. He's like the modern hipster of the 1950/1960s.

I'm going to pick up 'The stranger' tomorrow since I'll have a whole week at the beach doing nothing..I hope this is going to be exciting/inspiring
HAHAHA HOW IRONIC :D

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1850 on: July 26, 2013, 07:01:52 PM »
could someone briefly explain why I ought to read ulysses? it seems overhyped.

It is not.  It really pushes the boundaries of literature stylistically and linguistically while still being intelligible (for the most part).  It's a prescient novel that save for some references here and there deal with the totality of the human experience and is just timeless.  You learn more about it, about art in general, and about yourself and humanity with each reading (sounds corny, but it's true).

BRIX SKWIKZ

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1851 on: July 28, 2013, 12:52:32 PM »

ChronicBluntSlider

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1852 on: August 05, 2013, 12:05:56 AM »


I really liked this. Super funny. Up there with Animal Farm for great satires. Only about 120 pages too.

shitsandwich

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1853 on: August 07, 2013, 01:25:24 PM »
I just picked up Nausea by Sarte, anyone else read it?

Yes. In my eyes it is completely overrated.

I've never been a huge fan of Sartre. Or Simone de Beauvoir for that matter. Camus is by far the most (read: the only) exciting writer of the "French Existentialists".

However, in all fairness, people have tried to imitate Sartre for so long that his style seems really bland, played out, unoriginal, and boring nowadays. He's like the modern hipster of the 1950/1960s.

I'm going to pick up 'The stranger' tomorrow since I'll have a whole week at the beach doing nothing..I hope this is going to be exciting/inspiring

Thats perfect to read on a sunny day at the beach

Smell Good

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1854 on: August 08, 2013, 06:29:36 PM »
Just started John Le Carre's The Spy Who Came In from the Cold

I've read a couple of Le Carre's books, but all of them are the recent ones and I've neglected this classic for far too long.

Going to try and get into the George Smiley books sometime too. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is one of my favorite films

brycickle

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1855 on: August 08, 2013, 06:39:03 PM »
^^^That's good stuff.

 You and the D00D have turned this thread into a horrible head-on-collision between a short bus full of retarded kids and a van full of paraplegics.



Smell Good

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1856 on: August 08, 2013, 08:45:32 PM »
Any of you guys still purchase books? I used to buy books all the time but I can't really justify it anymore. I've been getting everything from the library these past few years.

I've been looking at pictures of people's private libraries and I can seriously wank to that shit.

http://www.beautiful-libraries.com/index.html

http://thatlibrary.tumblr.com/

I'm already thinking about how I'd set my reading nest up one day when I move out and get my own place. Gotta have that Eames lounge chair.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1857 on: August 09, 2013, 10:11:43 AM »
I only buy physical copies of books.  The only exception to this is when I was in school and I'd have to take out books (especially very old/obscure ones) for assignments.  But if I found it really useful, is eventually pick up a copy of it from somewhere.  We have a great campus bookstore that kicks the shit out of other college bookstores I've seen.  The prices rack up, so I've turned to buying used books off of Amazon for super cheap or filling in my fiction gaps from Half-Priced Books and other used bookstores.  I find that, on the whole, it's not really anymore hit-or-miss than getting them new an all of my copies have been in really good, if not almost new, condition. 

In actuality, the worst thing is having to find space for all of them.  I have piles of them randomly in my (small ass) bedroom and computer room.

handsclapanin

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1858 on: August 14, 2013, 10:31:12 AM »
could someone briefly explain why I ought to read ulysses? it seems overhyped.

It is not.?  It really pushes the boundaries of literature stylistically and linguistically while still being intelligible (for the most part).?  It's a prescient novel that save for some references here and there deal with the totality of the human experience and is just timeless.?  You learn more about it, about art in general, and about yourself and humanity with each reading (sounds corny, but it's true).

For the last few years all I've really read is the "classics". Right now I'm reading This Side Of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald.
Ulysses was on my list to read. I know that is Joyce's most famous book. So I usually like to check out an authors lesser known books before reading their "big" book. I read a collection of short stories by him, Dubliners. That wasn't too bad. Then I got Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Figured this would be good before Ulysses since it concerns one of the same characters. I get all my books from the library. You checkout a book for 3 weeks. With the option to renew checkout twice. So you can keep a book for 9 weeks total, if necessary. Usually I'll finish a book within those 3 weeks. But I had that Portrait book for 9 weeks and only got about 2/3 of the way through. It was so slow going. Just seemed like a bunch of religious doctrine. If Ulysses is anything like that book; I don't think I'm interested.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1859 on: August 14, 2013, 11:42:27 AM »
Yeah, he's not for everybody.  But I've never had a problem getting through his books so I really don't know what to tell you.  I can kind of see what you mean with regards to Portrait, but since I know how it goes, I don't really think of it that way.  Religion plays a big part, but it's really a very cerebral description of the interplay between individuals, their social situations, and the creative impulse.