Author Topic: books to read  (Read 247652 times)

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Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1860 on: August 14, 2013, 11:55:07 AM »
I just picked up Nausea by Sarte, anyone else read it?

Yes. In my eyes it is completely overrated.

I've never been a huge fan of Sartre. Or Simone de Beauvoir for that matter. Camus is by far the most (read: the only) exciting writer of the "French Existentialists".

However, in all fairness, people have tried to imitate Sartre for so long that his style seems really bland, played out, unoriginal, and boring nowadays. He's like the modern hipster of the 1950/1960s.

I'm going to pick up 'The stranger' tomorrow since I'll have a whole week at the beach doing nothing..I hope this is going to be exciting/inspiring

Thats perfect to read on a sunny day at the beach

Last summer I read a whole Kafka book at the beach so it's alright


aleksander

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1862 on: August 19, 2013, 06:54:03 AM »
I just picked up Nausea by Sarte, anyone else read it?

Yes. In my eyes it is completely overrated.

I've never been a huge fan of Sartre. Or Simone de Beauvoir for that matter. Camus is by far the most (read: the only) exciting writer of the "French Existentialists".

However, in all fairness, people have tried to imitate Sartre for so long that his style seems really bland, played out, unoriginal, and boring nowadays. He's like the modern hipster of the 1950/1960s.

I'm going to pick up 'The stranger' tomorrow since I'll have a whole week at the beach doing nothing..I hope this is going to be exciting/inspiring

Thats perfect to read on a sunny day at the beach

Last summer I read a whole Kafka book at the beach so it's alright

Revisit this thread after you've read the book and giggle at this post.


If anyone reads YA or Middle Grade stuff (maybe you're a teacher?), "Wonder" by RJ Palacio is fantastic. Every book I've read since has been a bore because I got so much out of"Wonder."
"Let's just do something stupid and ridiculous and just be as fucking retarded as we possibly can."

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1863 on: August 25, 2013, 06:50:24 AM »

SqueezeThePulp

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1864 on: August 25, 2013, 02:21:06 PM »
someone might have already mentioned it, but Siddhartha is a good book.

tuque

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1865 on: August 25, 2013, 02:26:31 PM »

Exactly, still really fun to read though. So much is based deep in Japanese culture/history/mythology/psychology.
I read this and gave it to my girlfriend.

She was bummed haahahahaha. The stories are all pretty depressing.


"please,  just call me Frog"



Just finished (and enjoyed) this...I think I got the recommendation from this thread but can't remember now.





And have these two up next.  Decided to pick up the Salter book after reading a Bill Callahan interview the other day where he talks about him...







The Stranger at the beach had me cracking up.  I might have to dust my copy off and head out there before it gets cold here. 


wheee!

few123456789

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1866 on: August 25, 2013, 02:56:43 PM »
The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven
Indian Killer

Both by Sherman Alexie.  For some reason he doesn't have Indian Killer on his website, but it's not a bad novel.

Smell Good

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1867 on: September 05, 2013, 07:59:57 PM »


This is maybe my 4th time picking this up from the library. Every time I've gotten started on it, I end up getting busy/distracted and fall off but I'm going to stick with it this time.

I think it's good to always have a history book in your rotation.

Want to get into Ancient Roman history but that shit intimidates me, honestly wouldn't even know where to start considering the breadth of works on that topic

Spike Hawke

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1868 on: September 09, 2013, 12:28:03 PM »
Just finished Neil Gaimans American Gods, was ok but not totally blown away by it. Read that because I read his Neverwhere and really liked it. In between those I read Only Forward by Michael Marshall Smith which was fucking ace. Best book I've read in a while.

Still trying to recover after reading all the Game of Thrones books.

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1869 on: September 09, 2013, 01:00:39 PM »


Want to get into Ancient Roman history but that shit intimidates me, honestly wouldn't even know where to start considering the breadth of works on that topic

I've dabbled in it some.  There doesn't seem to be any great documentaries on Roman history, surprisingly. 

How do you feel about podcasts?  In general, I think it's easier to get through history in audio or video formats than by dredging through books. There is a comprehensive History of Rome podcast that's decent.  I got through the first 30 or so episodes.  I recommend at least the first 2 episodes.  It talks about the distinction between fact and Mythology, which is basically all early Roman history is.    After the early history it talks a lot about the numerous wars and the structure of the government and I started to lose interest before the story gets good with Julius Caesar.  I only know the basic details about the life of Julius Caesar, so there is a lot more to learn.  I'd say just start with something concise and then see if you want to get into more detail. 
   
I'm currently listening to Dan Carlin's Hardcore History on the Decline of Rome (6ish episodes around 1 hour each).

A.J.K.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1870 on: September 09, 2013, 01:11:03 PM »

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1871 on: September 13, 2013, 02:01:57 PM »

ChewyPoo

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1872 on: September 13, 2013, 08:46:27 PM »
Reading Women by Charles Bukowski atm, I really wanna read books by that dude Haruki Muramuki that keeps popping up on here but our public library doesnt have it, worth buying?

Kinch

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1873 on: September 14, 2013, 02:46:58 AM »
Reading Women by Charles Bukowski atm, I really wanna read books by that dude Haruki Muramuki that keeps popping up on here but our public library doesnt have it, worth buying?

If you look hard enough you will find free downloadable Murakami ebooks. I've read Dance Dance Dance and I loved it; it was very easy to get into and the sense of piecing together the mystery at the heart of the story kept me coming back. Murakami's characters were likeable and he manages to make them surreal enough to be interesting and to fit with the weirder elements of the texts, but also human and believable. I say this but somehow I am yet to start another of his books.

I just finished this as a friend wrote his dissertation on it.



It's interesting how different the text actually is from the popular perception of it; it's not bawdy or lewd, but thought provoking on a difficult subject. It doesn't really come with a black and white moral (or immoral) message as many seem to think. Nabokov's afterword on the critical and publishing reception it received was also illuminating on this. 

I'm now probably going to start on another Murakami book thanks to this reminder.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1874 on: September 14, 2013, 08:19:35 AM »
Reading Women by Charles Bukowski atm, I really wanna read books by that dude Haruki Muramuki that keeps popping up on here but our public library doesnt have it, worth buying?

If you look hard enough you will find free downloadable Murakami ebooks. I've read Dance Dance Dance and I loved it; it was very easy to get into and the sense of piecing together the mystery at the heart of the story kept me coming back. Murakami's characters were likeable and he manages to make them surreal enough to be interesting and to fit with the weirder elements of the texts, but also human and believable. I say this but somehow I am yet to start another of his books.

I just finished this as a friend wrote his dissertation on it.



It's interesting how different the text actually is from the popular perception of it; it's not bawdy or lewd, but thought provoking on a difficult subject. It doesn't really come with a black and white moral (or immoral) message as many seem to think. Nabokov's afterword on the critical and publishing reception it received was also illuminating on this. 

I'm now probably going to start on another Murakami book thanks to this reminder.

I love Nabokov.  I took two separate classes on him in college: one was a general overview of his work, the other focused just on Pale Fire.  I've read all of his American novels so I have to start the rest of his Russian translations soon.  I'm actually reading Brian Boyd's biography of his American years along with a sociology book right now.  The more I learn about him, the more awesome he becomes.

aleksander

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1875 on: September 14, 2013, 06:40:07 PM »
Just finished Neil Gaimans American Gods, was ok but not totally blown away by it. Read that because I read his Neverwhere and really liked it. In between those I read Only Forward by Michael Marshall Smith which was fucking ace. Best book I've read in a while.

Still trying to recover after reading all the Game of Thrones books.

I felt the same way about American Gods. I got the feeling that if I knew more about mythology I would have caught a lot more references and enjoyed it more, but I don't, so I didn't. I read The Graveyard Book and Coraline as well, and they both felt kind of flat to me as well. Most people love him but I guess it's just not right for me.


Hell yes, especially The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle and Kafka on the Shore. Both amazingly well-written and beyond fucking weird.
Reading Women by Charles Bukowski atm, I really wanna read books by that dude Haruki Muramuki that keeps popping up on here but our public library doesnt have it, worth buying?
"Let's just do something stupid and ridiculous and just be as fucking retarded as we possibly can."

Mundungus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1876 on: September 18, 2013, 10:30:20 PM »
Sexy English major bitches kept posting this on FB and I finally got around to reading it

"Don't date a girl who reads" -Charles Warnke

http://sean.terretta.com/dont-date-a-girl-who-reads-charles-warnke


LesbianPUNCH

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1877 on: September 18, 2013, 10:59:59 PM »


Hell yes, especially The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle and Kafka on the Shore. Both amazingly well-written and beyond fucking weird.

[/quote]

I second this.  I went on a Murakami binge for a few weeks.  I've read 1Q84, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, After the Quake, and I'm about halfway through After Dark.  1Q84 is probably my favorite thus far solely because the characters are less apathetic and easier to empathize with, and for the most part Aomame and Tengo are both interesting people lost in the uncertainty of empty accomplishments and impending loneliness that comes with aging.  The story is also twisted, eery, and very mysterious, and though the main narrative ties up nicely Murakami leaves a lot of loose ends for you to chew on.  I like the dystopian atmosphere.  I was a little frustrated that the Little People weren't really explored further, but that's just me.     

Wind-Up Bird is an excellent read, tying in Japanese history with present day strangeness, and overall the book seems like a manifesto on suffering and stagnancy.  My only complaint is that Toru seems so indifferent about almost everything he faces in the novel aside from his hatred for a character who plays a vague and unsatisfying role in the story, and you spend most of the book watching him wrestle with a refusal to do anything productive after letting go of his occupation.  Toru basically deserves everything that comes his way.  While Toru weighed this work down, Lieutenant Mamiya was one of the saving graces of this work.  I love that he faces certain death and comes to peace with it, only to be cursed with the perpetual living nightmare that is his surviving.  His story is terrifying.  There is a lot that I love about this novel.  The good definitely outweighs the bad. 

BRIX SKWIKZ

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1878 on: September 18, 2013, 11:15:11 PM »
Sexy English major bitches kept posting this on FB and I finally got around to reading it

"Don't date a girl who reads" -Charles Warnke

http://sean.terretta.com/dont-date-a-girl-who-reads-charles-warnke



THE WRITER SUCKS THATS WHY THE GIRL DUMPED HIM

Smell Good

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1879 on: September 19, 2013, 07:01:09 AM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24116925

Things I am stoked on - Neal Stephenson working on a new book!

If you guys haven't read Cryptonomicon yet, pull your head out of your asses and get on it. And if you enjoyed that, jump straight into the Baroque Cycle. You will not regret it.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1880 on: September 19, 2013, 10:32:15 AM »
I've been into some newer stuff as of lately.



Don't know quite what to think of it. Part of me really likes the overall idea, but it gets predictable at some point. Still worth a read.



Quite a good read. Really liked it.

Two days ago I started the following book which is pretty much a mix of fiction and non-fiction. It tells the story of the year 1913 by paragraphs (or even sub-chapters) on the actions involving famous persons or inventions from that time and how they foreshadow the catastrophe to come the following year. So far I like it:



This one's next. I love Adorno and his work and I'm excited what this very recent book brings to the table. An English translation shouldn't be available yet.

« Last Edit: September 19, 2013, 10:33:47 AM by AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice »

kilgore.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1881 on: September 21, 2013, 09:01:52 PM »


No holds barred, til labias say "free us"
then its straight to your kids' school, wine coolers in the Prius

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1882 on: September 21, 2013, 09:44:39 PM »
I'm reading Despair by Nabokov and taking my time through Naked by David Sedaris because I'm taking my girlfriend to see a reading from him for her birthday so I figured I should read something by him.

Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1883 on: September 27, 2013, 12:00:14 PM »
Revisit this thread after you've read the book and giggle at this post.

I started reading The Stranger today and finished in a couple of hours. It definitely flows well, with narration of Mersault everyday's life that shows his feeling-less attitude towards pretty much everything thats not material. After being condamned he expresses some emotions yet still fully and coldly accepting what's is awaiting him.
I don't know, I'll now look up for discussions with themes, points of view and so on, but at least on first impression 'The Stranger' definitely didn't stood up or blew my mind; it's still a good and quick novel.

Merked

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1884 on: September 27, 2013, 12:17:20 PM »
Kurt Vonnegut

Read Slaughterhouse-five and thoroughly enjoyed it.  His description/concept of time was tittilating to say the least.  Reminds me of how Dr. Manhatton from Watchmen percieved time.

Also, almost done with Breakfeast of Champions and it is just as good if not better than Slaughterhouse-five.  I love the way his mind works and the structure of his novels is captivating.

His style is probably not for everyone, but I would highly recommend.

Going to get on Cat's Cradle soon too.


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kilgore.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1885 on: September 27, 2013, 02:18:18 PM »
lol
No holds barred, til labias say "free us"
then its straight to your kids' school, wine coolers in the Prius

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1886 on: September 27, 2013, 04:56:37 PM »
Kurt Vonnegut

Read Slaughterhouse-five and thoroughly enjoyed it.  His description/concept of time was tittilating to say the least.  Reminds me of how Dr. Manhatton from Watchmen percieved time.

Also, almost done with Breakfeast of Champions and it is just as good if not better than Slaughterhouse-five.  I love the way his mind works and the structure of his novels is captivating.

His style is probably not for everyone, but I would highly recommend.

Going to get on Cat's Cradle soon too.

Vonnegut's awesome.  I've read just about everything he's put out (I have to read the most recent collection of his two unfinished novels).  I read almost all of his stuff really quickly and while I was fairly young and haven't had much of a desire to go back and re-read him though oddly enough.  Usually I have no problem doing that with authors I like.  He's definitely a good author to have a lot of knowledge about.  He's a good guy to decompress with after you've read someone extremely difficult or involved too.

LloydChristmas

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1887 on: September 27, 2013, 05:20:39 PM »
Kurt Vonnegut

Read Slaughterhouse-five and thoroughly enjoyed it.  His description/concept of time was tittilating to say the least.  Reminds me of how Dr. Manhatton from Watchmen percieved time.

Also, almost done with Breakfeast of Champions and it is just as good if not better than Slaughterhouse-five.  I love the way his mind works and the structure of his novels is captivating.

His style is probably not for everyone, but I would highly recommend.

Going to get on Cat's Cradle soon too.

Vonnegut's awesome.  I've read just about everything he's put out (I have to read the most recent collection of his two unfinished novels).  I read almost all of his stuff really quickly and while I was fairly young and haven't had much of a desire to go back and re-read him though oddly enough.  Usually I have no problem doing that with authors I like.  He's definitely a good author to have a lot of knowledge about.  He's a good guy to decompress with after you've read someone extremely difficult or involved too.

yeah, good to decompress from non-fiction in general with a wild Vonnegut plot.  i didn't read the unfinished stuff yet either...i wonder if the works are organized enough to read through, haven't looked into them at all.

ChronicBluntSlider

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1888 on: September 27, 2013, 06:47:17 PM »
So it goes.

That's one of my favorite, I guess literary devices of all time.

Smell Good

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Re: books to read
« Reply #1889 on: September 27, 2013, 07:24:36 PM »
Started David Copperfield. Never read Dickens before (believe it or not).

I'm enjoying this.