Author Topic: books to read  (Read 248208 times)

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Alan

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2010 on: March 10, 2014, 07:40:23 AM »
Sorry about Judt, Chock. Hope you give it a go some other time.
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chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2011 on: March 10, 2014, 07:51:16 AM »
Sorry about Judt, Chock. Hope you give it a go some other time.

No problem.  It's so far made me more interested in parts of history I hadn't really looked into before. 

Ollie Ringwald

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2012 on: March 10, 2014, 08:42:07 AM »
Breakfast of Champions is awesome even though Vonnegut didn't seem to be too big of a fan of it.


It wasn't my favorite of his. Then again, there's no such thing as a bad Vonnegut book.

I agree.?  I still haven't read his most famous book, but I have it so I will one day.?  I'm about to start The Corrections, it looks long as fuck I hope it's worth it.

I prefer Breakfast of Champions to Slaughterhouse 5 for what its worth.

Anyway, the Corrections is really good and doesn't feel like a long book when you're reading it.

tumulishoomaroom

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2013 on: March 10, 2014, 04:30:14 PM »


Quote
Throughout the vast American West, nature is being vicitimized by a Big Government / Big Business conspiracy of bridges, dams and concrete. But a motley gang of individuals has decided that enough is enough. A burnt-out veteran, a mad doctor and a polygamist join forces in a noble cause: to dismantle the machinery of progress through peaceful means, or otherwise.

One of the best book I've read recently, really loved it. I didn't know there was a version with Crumb illustrations, I would have tried to find that one otherwise...


oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2014 on: March 13, 2014, 06:55:53 AM »
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.  A bunch of people recommended it.  It's a common book for my old high school to teach, but I wasn't in that literature course, so I missed that chance.  I'm about a quarter of the way through and am rather indifferent to it so far.  It's cool to see where the Eastern/Buddhist mystique for the West came from and read the book that influenced so much of the "find yourself" tourism culture, but I think it really has suffered from that phenomenon.  It just feels cliched at this point.

Joyce's play was pretty good and intriguing in terms of his entire oeuvre.  But you can definitely see why it wasn't as well received as his novels.

chockfullofthat

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2015 on: March 13, 2014, 07:40:11 AM »
Maybe it would be more meaningful for you if you listened to it over analog synths while drinking expensive teas??

http://noisey.vice.com/blog/we-watched-billy-corgan-play-an-eight-hour-freeform-synthesizer-interpretation-of-siddartha

perverted super otaku!

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2016 on: March 13, 2014, 07:59:07 AM »
this is actually awesome! highly recommend

handsclapanin

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2017 on: March 29, 2014, 11:04:56 PM »
Went on a Knut Hamson rampage. Vagabonds, its sequel August, and Growth of the Soil. Enjoyed them all. Vagabonds probably best. They were all longer books, around 500 pages, but read fast. My favorite book of his is still Hunger.
In between August and Soil, a quick little read: The Fall by Albert Chamus. Regret is a hell of a thing.
Then I just finished The Air Conditioned Nightmare by Henry Miller. First thing I've read of his.
And now I'm on this 2 story book by JD Salinger: Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters and Seymour, An Introduction. The first one was good.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2018 on: March 30, 2014, 10:07:34 AM »
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.  A bunch of people recommended it.  It's a common book for my old high school to teach, but I wasn't in that literature course, so I missed that chance.  I'm about a quarter of the way through and am rather indifferent to it so far.  It's cool to see where the Eastern/Buddhist mystique for the West came from and read the book that influenced so much of the "find yourself" tourism culture, but I think it really has suffered from that phenomenon.  It just feels cliched at this point.

I couldn't agree more. I thought exactly the same thing about the book. Hesse in general is really popular with spiritually inclined "find yourself" youths. He was the first "serious" author I read in my teens and has sparked my interest in literature. However, after Siddharta I found him way too spiritual for my taste and haven't read a Hesse book ever since. Steppenwolf, however, is really rad.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 10:10:16 AM by AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice »

aleksander

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2019 on: March 30, 2014, 07:20:51 PM »
Breakfast of Champions is awesome even though Vonnegut didn't seem to be too big of a fan of it.


It wasn't my favorite of his. Then again, there's no such thing as a bad Vonnegut book.

I agree.?  I still haven't read his most famous book, but I have it so I will one day.?  I'm about to start The Corrections, it looks long as fuck I hope it's worth it.

I prefer Breakfast of Champions to Slaughterhouse 5 for what its worth.

Anyway, the Corrections is really good and doesn't feel like a long book when you're reading it.


A month ago I never would have believed this, but then I just reread Slaughterhouse 5 and couldn't get into it at all. I kept waiting for the good shit I thought I remembered to start then the book was over. I enjoyed the first chapter (which is more like a foreword) way more than the rest.


Just read "Fragile Things," the Neil Gaiman short stories, which was excellent. I liked American Gods, but enjoyed this way more.

Also read SuperFreakonomics, which was good, but not as good as the first one.
"Let's just do something stupid and ridiculous and just be as fucking retarded as we possibly can."

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2020 on: April 07, 2014, 04:20:16 PM »
I'm reading The Design of Everyday Things, which was mentioned a few pages ago and it is so fucking boring.  I'm a little over half way through it and each chapter seems unnecessarily long and like a lot is rather repetitive.  Like he just keeps going over the same topics with extremely small differences each time and maybe adding a new term here or there.  In no way does it need to be almost 300 pages.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2021 on: April 11, 2014, 07:18:49 PM »


Hoping to finish on Pynchon In Public Day.

tuque

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2022 on: April 11, 2014, 09:10:14 PM »
Last good book I read was Lolita and it actually had me Lolin' at points.   Humbert Humbert is one of the most bizarre,  interesting characters I've ever come across.   


wheee!

Rusty_Berrings

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2023 on: April 11, 2014, 09:47:59 PM »
would it be cool if there was a prequel written to the bible? like, you know, before God created the heavens and the earth.

brycickle

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2024 on: April 12, 2014, 11:58:27 AM »
would it be cool if there was a prequel written to the bible? like, you know, before God created the heavens and the earth.
Do you have a physics book?

 You and the D00D have turned this thread into a horrible head-on-collision between a short bus full of retarded kids and a van full of paraplegics.



Mr. Lono

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2025 on: April 19, 2014, 10:52:21 PM »
I have been consuming Palahniuk books lately at a rapid speed (survivor, rant, haunted, fight club, choke, lullaby)but was hesitant to read a book with the main character being a 13 year old girl. That book being damned but the shit is great. Especially if you find the concepts of heaven and hell completely ridiculous and humorous.
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shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2026 on: April 20, 2014, 06:47:04 AM »
I have been consuming Palahniuk books lately at a rapid speed (survivor, rant, haunted, fight club, choke, lullaby)but was hesitant to read a book with the main character being a 13 year old girl. That book being damned but the shit is great. Especially if you find the concepts of heaven and hell completely ridiculous and humorous.
i think his skills are in retrograde. that 'hello satan, are you there? it's me margaret' [or whatever her name was] book was pretty terrible but i read it on the strength of all his older books. the one w/ the culling song is the dopeshow. imagine if you could just sing someone to sleep forever? america's population would be cut in half real quick.

Mr. Lono

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2027 on: April 20, 2014, 09:32:50 PM »
I agree with you that lullaby was a great book but disagree that his skills are dwindling. I haven't bought doomed yet but I am sure it will be .............dopeshow as well. I am also very curious to see how fight club 2 will play out. It takes place 10 years after the death of Durden. My next purchase will be either clown girl by Drake or filth by Welsh
Charlie don't skate

Mr. Lono

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2028 on: April 22, 2014, 10:39:47 PM »
Went on a Knut Hamson rampage. Vagabonds, its sequel August, and Growth of the Soil. Enjoyed them all. Vagabonds probably best. They were all longer books, around 500 pages, but read fast. My favorite book of his is still Hunger.
In between August and Soil, a quick little read: The Fall by Albert Chamus. Regret is a hell of a thing.
Then I just finished The Air Conditioned Nightmare by Henry Miller. First thing I've read of his.
And now I'm on this 2 story book by JD Salinger: Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters and Seymour, An Introduction. The first one was good.
Hamson's Hunger is a fucking great book! One day i will get around to reading another one of his books as well as Miller. I thought tropic of cancer was great so I think i will give air conditioned nightmare and Vagabonds a chance. Thanks for the recommendations. Did you know that Hitler kicked Hamson out of his house for talking shit? Also there is a fable/rumor that Knut cured himself of tuberculosis by riding on top of a train breathing through his mouth. It seems like you enjoy transgressive literature so here are some more authors in this category you might enjoy-Palahniuk, Bataille(on some porn de sade shit), Bukowski, Currie Jr, Selby Jr, and of course Thompson. I think everyone must read Bukowski! Also, when you're at the party and you move you're body, do you feel you gotta get up and beeeee somebody?
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 10:42:40 PM by Mr. Lono »
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Jared

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2029 on: April 23, 2014, 08:33:58 AM »
I'm reading the Vagabond Virgin by Erle Stanley Gardner right now and I am thoroughly enjoying it. Definitely has a noir type feel to it.



harrison ford invented the first car, in America

Jared

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2030 on: April 23, 2014, 08:35:05 AM »
Also has anyone on here read and finished Infinite Jest? My buddy and I were talking about trying to read it by the end of the year last night.



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oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2031 on: April 23, 2014, 11:41:22 AM »
I have not, but I've had several friends that have.  I'm waiting until I read his first novel before I start on Infinite Jest because I'm still ambivalent about DFW as a fiction writer.  I have done similarly structured and really long/dense books before and I've found that it's very helpful to set daily goals to get through the length.  Like, give yourself three months and figure out how many pages you have to read per day to finish in that time.  That way, if a section is dragging, you can tell yourself, "I only have 10 more pages to read today." instead of "This is taking forever and I still have 900 pages to read."

rob2

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2032 on: April 23, 2014, 12:51:54 PM »
I have not, but I've had several friends that have.  I'm waiting until I read his first novel before I start on Infinite Jest because I'm still ambivalent about DFW as a fiction writer.  I have done similarly structured and really long/dense books before and I've found that it's very helpful to set daily goals to get through the length.  Like, give yourself three months and figure out how many pages you have to read per day to finish in that time.  That way, if a section is dragging, you can tell yourself, "I only have 10 more pages to read today." instead of "This is taking forever and I still have 900 pages to read."

His first novel is a lot harder to get through, a lot less rewarding and generally worse than infinite jest.

Infinte jest is actually pretty fun to read for a lot of the time.

If you have read some of his essays and and short stories and like them then you'll like infinite jest - its one of the best reading experiences I've had

arthurspooner

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2033 on: April 23, 2014, 12:55:18 PM »


Hoping to finish on Pynchon In Public Day.
I've been meaning to read this. I'm stoked for the movie.

Tay

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2034 on: April 23, 2014, 01:33:16 PM »
Third time reading this. Love it!



Why I'll never reproduce:



 :)

pinche gringo

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2035 on: April 23, 2014, 04:28:45 PM »
Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine is worthy of a skim.

kilgore.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2036 on: April 24, 2014, 08:55:16 PM »
Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine is worthy of a skim.

understatement of the year right here...
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Mr. Lono

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2037 on: April 24, 2014, 09:58:21 PM »
Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine is worthy of a skim.

understatement of the year right here...


How the fuck do you skim journey to the end of the night?
Charlie don't skate

castillo's curls

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2038 on: April 25, 2014, 04:27:51 AM »
Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine is worthy of a skim.

understatement of the year right here...


How the fuck do you skim journey to the end of the night?



AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2039 on: April 25, 2014, 06:24:12 AM »
Just finished up on War and Peace. Despite it's length, it's a good read and very insightful. Easily one of the best books I've ever read. Minor pet peeves were the lack of real characters from lower classes (Platon as the only real exception) and Tolstoy's philosophy of history that becomes a bit redundant and feels modern and outdated at the same time. While his view on the significance 'great leaders' is refreshing even from a today's perspective, his philosophy of historical predetermination and spirit seems a bit weird.

In the months to come I'll be reading a bunch of contemporary German literature for my classes. Until then, I'll give E.T.A. Hoffmann a shot.