Author Topic: books to read  (Read 246812 times)

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VURNQUIST, VOV

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2580 on: July 27, 2016, 08:44:35 AM »

My favorite book in recent memory. A thorough examination of the tangled roots of money and debt in human societies. Brilliant. I'd recommend it to anyone. Graeber is an "anarchist" anthropologist who got kicked out of Yale. He's the man. Check him out on youtube.

Also by Graeber. A study on the pitfalls of bureaucracy. Challenging and thought provoking. 

The only fiction I've read this summer. Thought it was cool that a Vietnamese guy won the Pulitzer. The premise seemed to suit my taste, so I picked it up. It does not disappoint. Deserving of all the accolades.

sametelt

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2581 on: July 29, 2016, 12:09:08 AM »


and


botefdunn

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2582 on: July 30, 2016, 05:32:07 PM »
One of my favourite authors, also one of the only people I've read exhaustively. Just finishing this, which is the last thing of his I hadn't read. A bit sad that this is the end of the line, but the book is excellent.

Also really like the Black Sparrow Press editions, easy to find and really nice design.


20matar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2583 on: July 30, 2016, 06:05:03 PM »
Well, I decided that I should do my homework and read some of the BR books I've never read. Since I needed a light, maybe uplifting read, I read Paulo Coelho's the Alchemist. I now understand why people seem to hate him so much, and why he's so revered, too. It's a simple story, told with no frills, and it's pretty much a self-help book, but it's a powerful story and really helped me to put my life in perspective. I only wish I read the book sooner.

Then, I decided to read The Hour of the Star, by Clarice Lispector. It's a very short read, under 80 pages in the original Portuguese, and definitely a lot less in English, but it was still a task to read through it. Her writing can get tedious fast. It is a masterpiece, it is interesting, it's definitely a shining example of Lusophone literature or whatever, but I felt bored to death until I was halfway through it. What's up with female Ukrainian emigrant writers? Why are they always so verbose and so slow to get to the point already? Who is John Galt? And so on.

Now I'm back to Infinite Jest, and everything just clicks, considering this is my second read-through of the book. It's hard to put it down, it really is. Everything that didn't make sense on the time does now... or does it? The translation is elegant, too. What really gets me about Wallace is that no line is there "just because", every single thing he wrote seems to be connected to the greater whole, every single choice of word just makes sense. He's one hell of a storyteller.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2584 on: July 31, 2016, 02:49:52 AM »
Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I read Veronica Decides to Die many years ago (my mom gave it to me) and it definitely seemed like a "self-help novel", even though it wasn't as bad and cheesy as I thought it would. One of my favorite authors, Roberto Bolano, hates Coelho to his guts. I can definitely see why, but one has to keep in mind that it's a fight between different traditions of Latin American literature.

I've been really slow on reading for the past couple of weeks, because I was doing an awesome road trip throught the Balkans. I finished The Bridge on the Drina the other day and really liked it. It's been the perfect book to read while travelling the region.

I just started reading a novel by this fashionable young German author Juli Zeh. I've heard her name mentioned a lot recently and I only have little idea who she is, so I decided to give her a shot. I'm normally not too much into "mainstream culture", but I'm interested in literature and contemporary literature, so it was about time I guess. Her novel (Eagles and Angels in the English translation) is a quick, capturing read, but it's also what I would call "pop literature". It tries to be edgy but seems a little forced. Still not bad at all. And it's good to read outside my comfort zone.


shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2585 on: July 31, 2016, 07:27:10 PM »
Someone gave me this and it's surprisingly engaging.  Anyone read anything by this guy?  Apparently he wrote for The Wire, as well as writing a number of screenplays for films that we have all seen. 


I enjoyed clockers & read (think it's called) ladies man also cause clockers and freedom land were good urban novels. Ladies man was like set in the 70s, dude was just about hopping broad to broad but it was ok. Other 2 they made movies outta but books always better.

VURNQUIST, VOV

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2586 on: August 02, 2016, 09:24:49 AM »
One of my favourite authors, also one of the only people I've read exhaustively. Just finishing this, which is the last thing of his I hadn't read. A bit sad that this is the end of the line, but the book is excellent.

Also really like the Black Sparrow Press editions, easy to find and really nice design.



Black Sparrow has the NICEST layouts.

botefdunn

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2587 on: August 08, 2016, 10:58:51 PM »
yeah it's funny, I collect books, but not first editions or even necessarily rare ones, just ones I think are beautiful and/or unique and have some merit or other content-wise

sexualhelon

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2588 on: August 09, 2016, 06:36:59 AM »



SFblah

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2589 on: August 09, 2016, 07:40:01 AM »
Haven't looked at this topic in awhile. Cool to see so much mention of Bolano. I've only read Distant Star and a local author told me that he believes he's a better short story writer than he gets credit for so I'm gonna check those out. I've been reading lots of translated work because Deep Vellum Publishing http://deepvellum.org/shop/ is here in Dallas and that is all they do. Also, they opened a small bookstore in their location so I'm stoked on that.




Anne Garreta's Sphinx from Deep Vellum Publishing was interesting because it doesn't identify the gender of either person in the relationship. She is a member of OuLiPo which give themselves certain constraints to write around. As you read it you think you know what their genders are then it flips it on you.


This author is often compared to Beckett, who I've never read, and Kafka. I've never read any stream of conscious/automatic writing before until this. At the beginning I wasn't liking it but about 1/4 way through I got the rhythm of his writing and then I actually really liked it. This kind of writing, at least based on this book, feels best read in one or two sittings. I felt it is absorbed better than chopping it up too much.


This was pretty funny and the format changed alot but really enjoyed it.


This is the book I've been looking forward to for a few weeks and waiting for my book store to get my order in. Egyptian dystopia that I can't wait to read. While I've been waiting it has since been getting alot of good reviews.


Also, next up I have M Train

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2590 on: August 10, 2016, 01:05:38 PM »
Some of these look really interesting SFblah. I'll look into them. And yes, Bolano was a good short story writer as well. Even though most people say, himself included, that he was best as a poet.

Starting my first Mark Twain book since childhood in a minute. I can't believe it's been that long...


bea!

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2591 on: September 03, 2016, 09:32:25 AM »


Read it before but always worth a re-read when I'm searching for a new book.

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2592 on: September 03, 2016, 10:40:03 AM »


Read it before but always worth a re-read when I'm searching for a new book.
Haaaa!
It's been forever since I read that one! Pre-fight club non fiction explanation of maybe emasculated working men traveling Europe to riot in other cities/countries. Not just America that was gnarlier a few decades back (yet people still get worked up alot. Shtoops!)
Rad book

SFblah

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2593 on: September 08, 2016, 06:15:46 AM »
Half Price book finds last night. Some classics I've wanted to read/re-read along with both Bulgakovs I've wanted.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2594 on: September 08, 2016, 07:44:41 AM »
Half Price book finds last night. Some classics I've wanted to read/re-read along with both Bulgakovs I've wanted.


That's  a nice collection of copies you got there. The Old Man and the Sea is a bit meh IMO, but most of the rest (all those I know) kick ass. Master and Margarita is awesome. I didn't like reading Blood Meridian, but it's a book that I couldn't stop thinking about since I put it down more a year ago. You'll probably see what I mean, because a lot of people I talked to had similar reactions... Metamorphosis is just really good, and you'll start seeing allusions to Kafka everywhere, because it's been so influential. Have fun reading these!

20matar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2595 on: September 08, 2016, 10:38:55 AM »
Half Price book finds last night. Some classics I've wanted to read/re-read along with both Bulgakovs I've wanted.


The Old Man and the Sea is a bit meh IMO

You take that back!
(Personally, my MEH IMO Hemingway book is The Sun Also Rises... so I really get what you mean)
Great haul, I want to re-read Blood Meridian as soon as I can. It's fucked up on so many levels, maybe the book that thrilled me the most.

Right now, I'm almost halfway through Infinite Jest... just finished the match of Eschaton. It's something I'd love to see happen in real life, but it's gotta be a dull game to just watch.

Can of Soup

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2596 on: September 09, 2016, 10:20:34 AM »
Half Price book finds last night. Some classics I've wanted to read/re-read along with both Bulgakovs I've wanted.


The Old Man and the Sea is a bit meh IMO

You take that back!
(Personally, my MEH IMO Hemingway book is The Sun Also Rises... so I really get what you mean)
Great haul, I want to re-read Blood Meridian as soon as I can. It's fucked up on so many levels, maybe the book that thrilled me the most.

Right now, I'm almost halfway through Infinite Jest... just finished the match of Eschaton. It's something I'd love to see happen in real life, but it's gotta be a dull game to just watch.

Slowly moving through this right now--you guys would probably dig it:


cookieboy

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2597 on: September 10, 2016, 01:17:06 PM »
Recently ordered a bunch of books that I've seen recommended on here. I'm currently reading "Kafka on the Shore" by Haruki Murakami after finishing the "Wind-up Bird Chronicle" and I'm really digging it so far. About half way through the book and doing my best to finish it in a timely manner but enjoy it so I can go through some other books before I plan on picking any new ones. 

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2598 on: September 11, 2016, 06:31:12 AM »
Half Price book finds last night. Some classics I've wanted to read/re-read along with both Bulgakovs I've wanted.


The Old Man and the Sea is a bit meh IMO

You take that back!
(Personally, my MEH IMO Hemingway book is The Sun Also Rises... so I really get what you mean)
Great haul, I want to re-read Blood Meridian as soon as I can. It's fucked up on so many levels, maybe the book that thrilled me the most.

Right now, I'm almost halfway through Infinite Jest... just finished the match of Eschaton. It's something I'd love to see happen in real life, but it's gotta be a dull game to just watch.

Whaaaat?! The Old Man and the Sea is like the Pretty Sweet of Hemingway's oeuvre. The man was way past his prime when he wrote it. I've never read The Sun Also Rises, but personally I like his early books and stories best. That being said, Hemingway isn't my most favourite author in general.

Grind King Rims

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2599 on: September 11, 2016, 12:59:55 PM »
I haven't read The Old Man and the Sea, but I really enjoyed The Sun Also Rises. My meh imo hemingway book was For Whom the Bell Tolls.


"Strictly for the culture" - Brian Wenning 2017

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Smell Good

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2600 on: September 12, 2016, 02:28:00 PM »
How many books are you guys reading at once? I'm staring at my shelf and there's 7 with bookmarks in em, although I've put two on hiatus

I need to reel this shit in and quit starting so many goddamn books.

There's a pile that I've also bought but haven't even cracked open. They've never been so cheap and easy to buy these days (especially used).

Molte

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2601 on: September 12, 2016, 03:53:23 PM »
I'm currently reading The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha and it does me pretty well I must say.. So far at least, but I don't see it slowing down on the action or subtleties anytime soon, so everything should be good..

I did try to read The Old Man And The Sea, and I don't know, if it's because my chest hair still hasn't grown out at the age of 29, but it did bore me oh so awfully a lot. Never made it past 20 pages..
« Last Edit: September 15, 2016, 02:09:07 PM by Molte »
SHIT!

snickers

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2602 on: September 12, 2016, 04:14:47 PM »
just finished johnathan franzen's how to be alone. a- 9/10

currently reading the book of disquiet by fernando pessoa.
Sorry if I'm depressing snickers/ice nine/whoever.  We can't all be tatted up, broad-slaying, OC, cool guys.

20matar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2603 on: September 13, 2016, 05:20:41 AM »
just finished johnathan franzen's how to be alone. a- 9/10

currently reading the book of disquiet by fernando pessoa.

Voce eh portugues? I never read Fernando Pessoa. Poetry is one thing that I don't really "get"... or do I? It's something that really worries me. The most that I feel when I read poetry is to think, "that's cool", "nice rhymes/metrics", but I feel it's just not for the likes of me.

On the other hand, reading The Old Man and the Sea felt really vivid for me, and thrilling. Maybe it's the simplicity of the tale, and the fact that I know that I just wouldn't even come close to catching the fish. It gives me the exact opposite feeling of watching a horror movie. When watching a horror movie, I feel like the characters are useless, and that I would fare way better than then. Reading takes me off my world entirely. I just let the author and the characters take me along to their mindset.

snickers

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2604 on: September 13, 2016, 06:30:33 AM »
just finished johnathan franzen's how to be alone. a- 9/10

currently reading the book of disquiet by fernando pessoa.

Voce eh portugues? I never read Fernando Pessoa. Poetry is one thing that I don't really "get"... or do I? It's something that really worries me. The most that I feel when I read poetry is to think, "that's cool", "nice rhymes/metrics", but I feel it's just not for the likes of me.

On the other hand, reading The Old Man and the Sea felt really vivid for me, and thrilling. Maybe it's the simplicity of the tale, and the fact that I know that I just wouldn't even come close to catching the fish. It gives me the exact opposite feeling of watching a horror movie. When watching a horror movie, I feel like the characters are useless, and that I would fare way better than then. Reading takes me off my world entirely. I just let the author and the characters take me along to their mindset.

i'm reading an english translation. some of my favourite writers are spanish and portuguese. i wouldn't describe book of disquiet as poetry. it's more of a diary.
Sorry if I'm depressing snickers/ice nine/whoever.  We can't all be tatted up, broad-slaying, OC, cool guys.

Can of Soup

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2605 on: September 14, 2016, 10:47:15 AM »
Recently ordered a bunch of books that I've seen recommended on here. I'm currently reading "Kafka on the Shore" by Haruki Murakami after finishing the "Wind-up Bird Chronicle" and I'm really digging it so far. About half way through the book and doing my best to finish it in a timely manner but enjoy it so I can go through some other books before I plan on picking any new ones.  

Nice choices! Finished up Murakami's full-length novels this summer; ended with "Kafka on the Shore"--it was probably my favorite, Nakata always telling people about "good dumps" slayed me. I also really enjoyed "After Dark" even though apparently it's not so well-liked generally..it's a quick read with an interesting concept. "Norwegian Wood" was for sure the most depressing one, to me. As far as his short stories go, I've only read "The Strange Library", which has the character the Sheep Man from the Rat Trilogy...you could read it as kind of a prequel to those, I guess. I'll probably try to move on to his short-story collections--he's also got a new book that is a conversation with his friend, composer Seiji Ozawa, which looks fun (have never read his nonfiction, though).

just finished johnathan franzen's how to be alone. a- 9/10
Will have to check this one out--only thing I've read by Franzen is his first one, "The Twenty-Seventh City"--basically ends in total chaos.

The "Everybody Behaves Badly" book is amazing, between running with the bulls, trading manuscripts with Ezra Pound, going to Gertrude Stein's salons, and endless fishing, drinking, and banging, Hemmingway just signed his first "major" book deal...wish Lesley Blume would do a comprehensive biography on Hemmingway, she's a fantastic author.

Have this one lined up to read next:



 
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 11:20:05 AM by Can of Soup »

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2606 on: September 18, 2016, 07:10:56 AM »
I haven't had much time for reading in the past month, which means I'm only halfway through Mark Twain's A Tramp Abroad. I really like Twain's humour and the book had me laughing out loud a couple of times already. For some reason, I'm reading it really slowly though. I'm not a native speaker and Twain's humour is all about language... this has been the first book in years that had me struggling with language a bit. Still really good!

I bought these two the other day and I might start reading one of them along with Twain. Has anyone read either of them? Any good? I'm excited about both. All my writer friends love both of them and so far their recommendations were pretty much on point.



« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 07:24:30 AM by AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice »

SFblah

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2607 on: September 18, 2016, 05:56:13 PM »
I haven't read either author but Ferrante gets nothing but good things said about her. I never read her because I totally have judged a book by its cover and can't stand hers. I need to give one a try.

Gay Imp Sausage Metal

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2608 on: September 20, 2016, 08:45:21 PM »
Nice choices! Finished up Murakami's full-length novels this summer; ended with "Kafka on the Shore"--it was probably my favorite, Nakata always telling people about "good dumps" slayed me. I also really enjoyed "After Dark" even though apparently it's not so well-liked generally..it's a quick read with an interesting concept. "Norwegian Wood" was for sure the most depressing one, to me. As far as his short stories go, I've only read "The Strange Library", which has the character the Sheep Man from the Rat Trilogy...you could read it as kind of a prequel to those, I guess. I'll probably try to move on to his short-story collections--he's also got a new book that is a conversation with his friend, composer Seiji Ozawa, which looks fun (have never read his nonfiction, though). 
You need to get "The Elephant Vanishes", made me more of a fan of his short stories than his long ones

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Can of Soup

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2609 on: September 22, 2016, 07:39:06 AM »
Nice choices! Finished up Murakami's full-length novels this summer; ended with "Kafka on the Shore"--it was probably my favorite, Nakata always telling people about "good dumps" slayed me. I also really enjoyed "After Dark" even though apparently it's not so well-liked generally..it's a quick read with an interesting concept. "Norwegian Wood" was for sure the most depressing one, to me. As far as his short stories go, I've only read "The Strange Library", which has the character the Sheep Man from the Rat Trilogy...you could read it as kind of a prequel to those, I guess. I'll probably try to move on to his short-story collections--he's also got a new book that is a conversation with his friend, composer Seiji Ozawa, which looks fun (have never read his nonfiction, though). 
You need to get "The Elephant Vanishes", made me more of a fan of his short stories than his long ones

Will definitely check that one out next, then--thanks!  ;)