Author Topic: books to read  (Read 247014 times)

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shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2790 on: June 08, 2017, 08:36:24 PM »


Haruki Murakami is the shit.
i tried to put this on layaway at the library but those shitbirds reessrved me the hemingway book of the same title! i was pissed as punch so  i didn't take out the hem version, i got a david sedaris book in protest.
i'm almost done w/ 'langstroth's hive and the honeybees' by langstroth aka the 1800s priest who invented the popular 'box hive' that we all [mostly all] use today. he's got funny, flowery language about how the bee was given to us by god like the fruit tree and he really loves his bees so it's an enjoyable read. if you're not already into bees it might just spark your interest? or not....

That book about the bees sounds rad! Maybe I'll check it out. Also, I got a good laugh about the librarians reserving the wrong title for you. Haruki is big on paying homage, so the Hemingway title confusion makes sense. What Sedaris book do you get? I've read almost all of his work "Me Talk Pretty One Day, When You Are Engulfed In Flames, Dress Your Family In Corduroy and Denim, and Holiday on Ice". If you got his newest book, is it any good? I heard him promoting it on Fresh Air last week, just haven't gotten around to checking it out yet.

I just can't shake this Steven king kick and I'm glad I didn't...

I just finished under the dome and it's easily one of the top 20 books I've ever read. Would be top 10 if the end didn't kind of turn into a clisterfuck... but that's typical king.

I really recommend it if you are looking for something to get burried into


Also on the books that bore you kick... if you are not feeling it why bother. If it was meant to be it will come around your way again. Books have a funny way of showing up on your lap when you are ready for them. No need to force it.

Steven King is the shit! Just read Salem's Lot on a recommendation about a month ago and got into a King kick too! Started reading some of his kid's stuff (Joe Hill) and really liked "Heart Shaped Box". It was a real quick read, kind of cheesy, but entertaining nonetheless. Tried to read Joe Hill's "The Fireman" afterwards and kind of got bored with it, hopefully, I can pick it up sooner than later and finish it.

About to finish Murakami's first novel "Norwegian Wood". Looking on recommendations for my next read.
i read 'me talk pretty' and some other sedaris long ago. this one is called 'theft by finding' and it's all diary entries from late 70s-early 80s [so far]. dude lived a lot more wild than i remembered from his other books. doing meth and acid, hitchhiking around the country and such. i dig that sort of stuff and paragraph to page diary entries means you can pick it up anywhere or read any amount at a time.
the 'men w/out women' book arrived and i'm a few stories in on that. digging it, thanks for the recommendation!

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2791 on: June 08, 2017, 10:03:23 PM »


I bought the hardcover version of this in NYC over a decade ago, thought it would be great b/c I was a huge Tintin fan, and it turned out to be terrible.

I just can't shake this Steven king kick and I'm glad I didn't...
Check out Rose Madder, that's a good one.

Last book I read I actually translated with my dad. It was a poetry book written by a woman I was insanely in love with and still am despite all the pressure and sadness. I also really miss reading regularly, I haven't read a novel in over two years.

Can you say more about "being a huge Tintin fan" and thinking the book was "terrible"?
Also, you translated a book with your dad? And it was published? ELABORATE MAN.

tortfeasor

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2792 on: June 09, 2017, 06:13:15 AM »






I bought the hardcover version of this in NYC over a decade ago, thought it would be great b/c I was a huge Tintin fan, and it turned out to be terrible.

I just can't shake this Steven king kick and I'm glad I didn't...

Check out Rose Madder, that's a good one.

Last book I read I actually translated with my dad. It was a poetry book written by a woman I was insanely in love with and still am despite all the pressure and sadness. I also really miss reading regularly, I haven't read a novel in over two years.




holy shit a lot just happened in this thread...

first off David Sederis is a literary treasure and among the great american writers in history.  In new york times terms i would say his books fall under "highly enjoyable" and "refreshing" category.  one of the few authors i can think of where i laugh out loud reading...  anyone who has not read any of his books please stop what you are reading and get cracking





SECOND:

dude you have to to elaborate on your entire post....  what languages are you translating? do you and your dad translate a lot together? is this like playing catch?
who is this woman who you love? tell me about her poetry.  is she the reason you stopped reading?!?! i need answers!!


Adam Abbas

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2793 on: June 09, 2017, 11:12:57 AM »
Can you say more about "being a huge Tintin fan" and thinking the book was "terrible"?
Also, you translated a book with your dad? And it was published? ELABORATE MAN.

Well I owned all the Tintin books since I was nine. Even visited the Tintin shop at the same time and bought a watch with the art from Destination Moon from it. I read all those books for years. Preferred the books to the TV show. Then I found out about the Alph-Art book and Congo book. Found the Congo book, started to read it, and it just seemed so racist - Tintin telling the Congolese "This is how a real man does things" etc.

Then I started to research Herge and he seemed to be pretty sketchy, but like R. Crumb he expressed his embarrassment with promoting stereotypes. But then I thought about how The Blue Lotus had a section where Tintin aimed to refute negative, outdated Chinese stereotypes. Still, I was just over it.

dude you have to to elaborate on your entire post....  what languages are you translating? do you and your dad translate a lot together? is this like playing catch?
who is this woman who you love? tell me about her poetry.  is she the reason you stopped reading?!?! i need answers!!

Haha, I honestly can't tell if you two are being sarcastic or not. Basically my dad and I don't spend too much time together, and we never did anything close to translating a book. The woman gave me a published poetry book of hers written in Arabic. Last year I visited my dad, and he  translated it while I wrote down what he said.
It was a bonding experience for us, and to bond over her work was really meaningful for me. Her poetry was progressive. But she grew increasingly distant from me while I did everything I could to be there.
I never cared so much about someone before. There's more to the story but I'll leave it there, it's painful to talk about. I've been depressed for months.
You're hollerin' Don Fisher

I'm screamin' Buddy Carr

tortfeasor

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2794 on: June 09, 2017, 01:13:05 PM »
Can you say more about "being a huge Tintin fan" and thinking the book was "terrible"?
Also, you translated a book with your dad? And it was published? ELABORATE MAN.

Well I owned all the Tintin books since I was nine. Even visited the Tintin shop at the same time and bought a watch with the art from Destination Moon from it. I read all those books for years. Preferred the books to the TV show. Then I found out about the Alph-Art book and Congo book. Found the Congo book, started to read it, and it just seemed so racist - Tintin telling the Congolese "This is how a real man does things" etc.

Then I started to research Herge and he seemed to be pretty sketchy, but like R. Crumb he expressed his embarrassment with promoting stereotypes. But then I thought about how The Blue Lotus had a section where Tintin aimed to refute negative, outdated Chinese stereotypes. Still, I was just over it.

dude you have to to elaborate on your entire post....  what languages are you translating? do you and your dad translate a lot together? is this like playing catch?
who is this woman who you love? tell me about her poetry.  is she the reason you stopped reading?!?! i need answers!!

Haha, I honestly can't tell if you two are being sarcastic or not. Basically my dad and I don't spend too much time together, and we never did anything close to translating a book. The woman gave me a published poetry book of hers written in Arabic. Last year I visited my dad, and he  translated it while I wrote down what he said.
It was a bonding experience for us, and to bond over her work was really meaningful for me. Her poetry was progressive. But she grew increasingly distant from me while I did everything I could to be there.
I never cared so much about someone before. There's more to the story but I'll leave it there, it's painful to talk about. I've been depressed for months.


dude i was being one hundred percent sincere.  obviously i understand why someone would not want to share the most intimate details of the intersection of their literary, love, and family life on a defunct skateboarding magazines message board. but shit--- this whole thing sounds like a fucking Khaled Hosseini book.  its your life and i'm just being nosy but it sounds like you have a story to tell.  if you find a medium to tell it PM a link.  i would be really interested. 

SFblah

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2795 on: June 28, 2017, 09:15:35 AM »
I just finished this which is really fucking good. The journalist and a photographer posed as refugees to report it. The amount of determination, patience, and money it takes someone to go through this is insane. These refugees get shaken down by so many people along the way on top of the high amount they already pay.


Abyss1

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2796 on: June 28, 2017, 10:19:12 AM »
just started this yesterday good read even if you dont know science and physics all that well


shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2797 on: June 29, 2017, 07:33:30 PM »
i started one called 'a $500 house in detroit' and i'm digging it thus far. feel slightly upset i missed the window there but i'm stoked to read about people making a go of it.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2798 on: July 06, 2017, 04:20:47 AM »
Anyone here read Hopscotch by Julio Cortazar? I am intrigued by its form:

"Written in an episodic, snapshot manner, the novel has 155 chapters, the last 99 designated as "expendable." Some of these "expendable" chapters fill in gaps that occur in the main storyline, while others add information about the characters or record the aesthetic or literary speculations of a writer named Morelli who makes a brief appearance in the narrative. Some of the "expendable" chapters at first seem like random musings, but upon closer inspection solve questions that arise during the reading of the first two parts of the book.

An author's note suggests that the book would best be read in one of two possible ways, either progressively from chapters 1 to 56 or by "hopscotching" through the entire set of 155 chapters according to a "Table of Instructions" designated by the author. Cort?zar also leaves the reader the option of choosing a unique path through the narrative."

Have you read Hopscotch by now?

I'm in the middle of it right now. It's one hell of a book I must say - just as crazy as your post made it seem. Even though it's a bit more linear than I thought at first: As recommended by the author, you read the first 56 chapters in the same order as you would read any other book. But between most chapters, you jump between one or more expendable chapters, which - more or less - enlighten your reading process. With each chapter, especially with the expendable ones, you never know what you're going to get: sometimes lyrics from a jazz song, sometimes a chapter from Morelli (a fictional philosopher), sometimes an extract from The Guardian, sometimes a director's cut-style additional chapter from the original plotline, sometimes a dialogue, sometimes an interior dialogue where every line belongs to a different sentence. The "main story" (in lack of a better world) centers around Horacio Oliveira, an Argentinian boheme living in 1950s Paris, and how he met, loved and lost "La Maga". Hopscotch is not a conventional love story, even though the relationship between Horacio and la Maga is gripping and at times heartbreaking. The book is not exactly a page turner either, but it's a redeeming read when you take your time. I like the book's crazy experiments with form, some more than others though. But that's ok, I guess Cortazar didn't want to write a novel like thousands before him and that's what makes it interesting.

I had to take a break in the middle of Hopscotch though, for the sake of a more straightforward book. I was sceptical about it when it came out a few years ago, but I decided to give Submission by Michel Houellebecq a try. All in all, it's an important book and I'm glad Houellebecq had the balls to publish a novel like that. I feel like the left throughout the West hasn't found a way to address and understand Islamism yet, even though it's a pressing issue for everybody and too important to leave it to the right. Houellebecq designs a Dystopian future, where a Muslim party with a charismatic leader wins the French election, because they succeeded in presenting themselves as a liberal alternative to Le Pen's Front National. It's an interesting experiment in thought, which will hopefully spark a debate among the liberal left (probably not). While I didn't mind Submission's politics, I didn't really like its literary qualities. But maybe I was just spoilt by Cortazar.

Has someone else read it? What did you think?

« Last Edit: July 06, 2017, 04:28:30 AM by AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice »

pinche gringo

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2799 on: July 10, 2017, 11:08:26 PM »
Already Dead by Denis Johnson. I'm new to his writing, but so far I really enjoy him.

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2800 on: July 30, 2017, 12:05:44 PM »
'the way to bee: meditation and the art of beekeeping' was dece. perhaps not for everyone.
read another called 'a world w/out bees' that's a few yrs old but kinda has a plan to preserve bees [spoiler alert: heterogenety].
for fun i read one called 'orangutan' by an irish american alcoholic. he's real irish like immigrant style, not just redheaded white trash w/ a drinking problem. he could've delved deeper into gnarliness and ordinary madness but it's a good read regardless.

colin

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2801 on: July 30, 2017, 08:01:36 PM »

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2802 on: August 02, 2017, 02:14:15 AM »
Finished Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance a while ago. It's a study of an environment that has grown increasingly foreign to liberal fucks like (most of) us. Compulsory reading for anyone interested in the social transformations of the past decades that have led to the right-wing backlash sweeping the West right now. Really good!



Now I'm on to Book 2 of Knausgaard's My Struggle. So far, I love his musings about the alienating experience of being a father for alleged "rebels" like him and the standardizations of "liberal" societies such as Sweden in the 21st century. We'll see if I get bored with this during the next 400 pages or if Knausgaard can keep surprising me.



On a sidenote, I refuse to read the German translations of his work, merely because they omitted the original title "My Struggle" in the translations. I feel like this is flying in the face of what an author like Knausgaard is trying to achieve. Also, calling the translation Lieben ("To Love") just sounds stupid.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2803 on: August 02, 2017, 10:25:20 PM »
I get that but seeing as how Knausgaard has said he's fine with Germany not using Mein Kampf as the title, it's not a huge deal.  Lieben is a weird title though.  I know that the UK has given them kinda unique subtitles (A Death in the Family, A Man in Love, Boyhood Island, Dancing in the Dark, and Some Rain Must Fall respectively) so they could have at least done something cool like that.

I really like all of the volumes (especially Book 3, which I thought had an interesting and impactful atmosphere) and am excited for the final translation to come out.  I've been kind of in a cycle of reading a volume around May/June and then November/December so it'll be weird to still have to wait since Book 6 is scheduled to release some time in 2018.

EDIT: Speaking of Knausgaard, he's going on a book tour for some upcoming essay collections he's releasing. I just got tickets for the NYC event (if anyone else end up going, feel free to PM me) but it might be worth it to do some googling and see if he's going to be around your city: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/karl-ove-knausgaard-presents-autumn-tickets-36486408831?err=29
« Last Edit: August 03, 2017, 03:20:01 PM by oyolar »

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2804 on: August 04, 2017, 02:17:51 AM »
Yeah, you're right. Publishing his books under the title Karl Ove Knausgaard: Mein Kampf 1 would have been wrong. Still, there's something about the German and British subtitles that I don't like. I prefer the American translations instead. I'm liking Book 2 so far btw.

Interesting. I've only read Book 1 and parts of Book 2, but I always thought Book 3 was the one that interested me the least. I might reconsider now though. What did you like about it (apart from the atmosphere)?

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2805 on: August 04, 2017, 02:09:23 PM »
Well, it's pretty par for what you'd expect from him stylistically, but it feels much more linear than the other two which is a nice break (even though I like his playing with time and his meanderings).  It also really helps explain more of his relationship with his father and develop the themes in Book 1 (and a little for Book 2 as well although that's mostly because you just feel like you understand him more).  But honestly, the atmosphere is really what does it, the cool way he captures the freedom of a young childhood outdoors, his father's looming presence, the nervousness of going to school, and then lets them blend and bleed together is really well done.

ChuckRamone

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2806 on: August 04, 2017, 11:30:36 PM »
I went to a reading Knausgaard did at 92Y in NYC a couple years ago and got Volumes 1 and 2 signed. It was pretty cool. I wonder if they'll be worth anything someday. I read Volume 3 but then stopped following him for a bit. Think I'll pick up the newer volumes soon and get back into it.

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2807 on: August 22, 2017, 01:37:18 PM »
i just snapped into one called 'my damage' by mr keith morris [goldstein].
was a big fan of circle jerks as a kid and black flag w/ him as singer more than any other. idk what the hell he's up to today, diabetes and a band named 'deep woods off' or some shit. i'll know more when i finish but i'm digging the 80s stories.

slappies

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2808 on: August 22, 2017, 02:56:43 PM »
i just snapped into one called 'my damage' by mr keith morris [goldstein].
was a big fan of circle jerks as a kid and black flag w/ him as singer more than any other. idk what the hell he's up to today, diabetes and a band named 'deep woods off' or some shit. i'll know more when i finish but i'm digging the 80s stories.

Hahah, Off! is actually sick, check 'em out if you haven't yet Sharktits.
I've been keeping an eye out for that book myself too, haven't come across it yet. I did pick up Harley Flannagan's book "Hard-Core" though which is insane. The life this guy has lead, before he was even 16 is incredible. I'm not finished yet, but I definitely recommend it to fans of Cro-Mags and Hardcore in general, or anyone who just wants to read crazy shit.
CRACK RAIDER RAZOR

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2809 on: August 22, 2017, 03:33:08 PM »
i just snapped into one called 'my damage' by mr keith morris [goldstein].
was a big fan of circle jerks as a kid and black flag w/ him as singer more than any other. idk what the hell he's up to today, diabetes and a band named 'deep woods off' or some shit. i'll know more when i finish but i'm digging the 80s stories.

Hahah, Off! is actually sick, check 'em out if you haven't yet Sharktits.
I've been keeping an eye out for that book myself too, haven't come across it yet. I did pick up Harley Flannagan's book "Hard-Core" though which is insane. The life this guy has lead, before he was even 16 is incredible. I'm not finished yet, but I definitely recommend it to fans of Cro-Mags and Hardcore in general, or anyone who just wants to read crazy shit.
kick it down when you're done, i'll mail you a jar of honey.

20matar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2810 on: August 23, 2017, 07:36:07 AM »
So who was the Lispector guy again? I'm gearing up mentally to read her Agua Viva, which a classmate told me to check out. Although I've been told that, in typical Clarice fashion, it's really difficult to read even though it clocks under a hundred pages. Let's see what's up with it.

brycickle

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2811 on: August 23, 2017, 09:26:21 AM »
Instead of reading "It", I'm being lazy and listening to it on Audible before the movie comes out. The scene where he describes Patrick Hockstetter murdering his baby brother is fucking horrifying. I think it's the first time I've gotten a genuine chill out of "reading" a book.

 You and the D00D have turned this thread into a horrible head-on-collision between a short bus full of retarded kids and a van full of paraplegics.



oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2812 on: August 23, 2017, 09:57:56 AM »
So who was the Lispector guy again? I'm gearing up mentally to read her Agua Viva, which a classmate told me to check out. Although I've been told that, in typical Clarice fashion, it's really difficult to read even though it clocks under a hundred pages. Let's see what's up with it.

I read Agua Viva, The Passion According to G.H., and Near to the Wild Heart and all of them were brief lengths but tough and much longer to get through than I expected. Honestly, I just don't think she's a good writer of anything with significant length. I've set aside her collected short stories for a while to spend time with her novels and also read other people (and I'm not a huge short story reader), but based on my experience reading those, that format fits her much better and makes for much more compelling material than her novels.

So if you don't like AV, I'd suggest giving her short stories a chance. And if you haven't read anything by her before, I recommend NOT starting with AV as it's her novelistic style ramped up to like 1000 which makes it very difficult to get through or get much of anything significant out of. I distinctly remember finishing it and being like "This was a mistake. I did not get anything from this that was worth the effort." It's generally considered her masterpiece or perfect distillation of her style and I'm usually not a person that recommends easing up to an author's best work, but Lispector and Joyce are the only people that I think you should not dive headfirst into their most talked-about work.

handsclapanin

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2813 on: August 25, 2017, 08:52:18 AM »
I'm stoked to be back on some good books.
I work M - F. My guaranteed reading time is Saturday and Sunday mornings, for the first hour or so after I wake up. While I'm having a smoothie and then coffee. If I'm reading something that I'm not so hyped on; this will be my only reading time for the week. But, when I have a book I like, I will bring it to work, read on my lunch break. Read some when I get home from work before dinner.
The last 4 or 5 months. Been a while since I've posted in this thread.
First was A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers. First thing I've read by him. Seen it mentioned in this thread. And recommended by Jason Dill & Jeff Grosso. For whatever that is worth. This one was weekend reading only for me. I had to re check it out from the library like 3 times to get through it.
Next up I got Portrait of An Artist as An Old Man by Joseph Heller. Last book by the famous auther of Catch 22. Which I read maybe 20 years ago. Another weekend only, boring read. Sometimes I'll have a book in mind, go online and put in a request at the library. For this one, I was just bored and walked in and pretty randomly grabbed this. So, what can you expect?
Since then, I've been on a good book run. Wind / Pinball by Haruki Murakami. 2 short novels, 1 book. I really dig this guy. Maybe 12 - 15 years ago, some one recommended Wind Up Bird Chronicles to me. I tried to get it at the library here (San Diego, not exactly a small town); but they did not have any english language versions. The closet I could get was a book on tape. CD actually. So I got that. Flash forward to 2017 and there were like 10 Murakami books at my local library branch on the shelf.
Next was Sputnik Sweetheart. Again a Murakami book. Great. Recommend.
Then I read Tortilla Flat by Steinbeck. Another good one. I'm almost through all he wrote, I think.
And currently on another Murakami. This time a book of short stories. Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman. Another one that I am enjoying and reading every day. Brought it to work with me today.


GAY

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2814 on: August 25, 2017, 12:15:16 PM »
If anybody is in the mood for a really terrifying short read, check out Bird Box by Josh Malerman. It's high concept and mostly succeeds. Really thrilling stuff.

S.

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2815 on: August 25, 2017, 12:46:28 PM »
I really liked Paul Beatty's "Slumberland". It was a really intelligent and funny read. I liked the american perspective on Berlin and its weird humor -and that so much of the novel is about musik.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2017, 05:37:14 PM by S. »

20matar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2816 on: August 25, 2017, 03:02:32 PM »
So who was the Lispector guy again? I'm gearing up mentally to read her Agua Viva, which a classmate told me to check out. Although I've been told that, in typical Clarice fashion, it's really difficult to read even though it clocks under a hundred pages. Let's see what's up with it.

I read Agua Viva, The Passion According to G.H., and Near to the Wild Heart and all of them were brief lengths but tough and much longer to get through than I expected. Honestly, I just don't think she's a good writer of anything with significant length. I've set aside her collected short stories for a while to spend time with her novels and also read other people (and I'm not a huge short story reader), but based on my experience reading those, that format fits her much better and makes for much more compelling material than her novels.

So if you don't like AV, I'd suggest giving her short stories a chance. And if you haven't read anything by her before, I recommend NOT starting with AV as it's her novelistic style ramped up to like 1000 which makes it very difficult to get through or get much of anything significant out of. I distinctly remember finishing it and being like "This was a mistake. I did not get anything from this that was worth the effort." It's generally considered her masterpiece or perfect distillation of her style and I'm usually not a person that recommends easing up to an author's best work, but Lispector and Joyce are the only people that I think you should not dive headfirst into their most talked-about work.

To quote a dying Steve Jobs: wow. I've finished ?gua Viva and, if it means what is says it should mean, to "paint with words", then I can say I "get it", even though I certainly never will truly get into the proper mindset. But I tried to go with the flow, and it was enjoyable and vivid. It's a work for a lifetime. She talks about everything from flowers to dinosaurs to cat motherhood to oysters and animals, from "is" to "it" and to fever-dream-like scenarios and landscapes. And it's definitely no drunken ramblings. Clarice has interesting reflections and thoughts, and I can certainly imagine that few people would pull off such a coherent "crazy" stream of consciousness text like she did.

Previously, I had read her The Hour of the Star... which I didn't enjoy half as much, even though it's a far more narrative text than Agua Viva. The movie, which isn't anything special, was much easier to follow. They picked such a pathetic, in the best sense of the word, actress to play her Macabea, and it made me really feel like I had to revisit the novel. Hopefully I will soon.

As for Joyce... I tried to read Ulysses but I literally said "fuck this" before reaching page 30. Everything on that... thing was lost on me. The translation I picked up was quite recent, made by the same translator who adapted Infinite Jest. So the fault is entirely on me. Hopefully I'll be well-equipped enough to pick it up again before the age of 30.

Alan

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2817 on: August 30, 2017, 04:46:22 PM »
Anyone here read Hopscotch by Julio Cortazar? I am intrigued by its form:

"Written in an episodic, snapshot manner, the novel has 155 chapters, the last 99 designated as "expendable." Some of these "expendable" chapters fill in gaps that occur in the main storyline, while others add information about the characters or record the aesthetic or literary speculations of a writer named Morelli who makes a brief appearance in the narrative. Some of the "expendable" chapters at first seem like random musings, but upon closer inspection solve questions that arise during the reading of the first two parts of the book.

An author's note suggests that the book would best be read in one of two possible ways, either progressively from chapters 1 to 56 or by "hopscotching" through the entire set of 155 chapters according to a "Table of Instructions" designated by the author. Cort?zar also leaves the reader the option of choosing a unique path through the narrative."

Have you read Hopscotch by now?

I'm in the middle of it right now. It's one hell of a book I must say - just as crazy as your post made it seem. Even though it's a bit more linear than I thought at first: As recommended by the author, you read the first 56 chapters in the same order as you would read any other book. But between most chapters, you jump between one or more expendable chapters, which - more or less - enlighten your reading process. With each chapter, especially with the expendable ones, you never know what you're going to get: sometimes lyrics from a jazz song, sometimes a chapter from Morelli (a fictional philosopher), sometimes an extract from The Guardian, sometimes a director's cut-style additional chapter from the original plotline, sometimes a dialogue, sometimes an interior dialogue where every line belongs to a different sentence. The "main story" (in lack of a better world) centers around Horacio Oliveira, an Argentinian boheme living in 1950s Paris, and how he met, loved and lost "La Maga". Hopscotch is not a conventional love story, even though the relationship between Horacio and la Maga is gripping and at times heartbreaking. The book is not exactly a page turner either, but it's a redeeming read when you take your time. I like the book's crazy experiments with form, some more than others though. But that's ok, I guess Cortazar didn't want to write a novel like thousands before him and that's what makes it interesting.



Super sorry about the late response. I started reading it but sort of had to put it on pause because of work stuff. I was a few chapters deep and I did like it. Not sure when I'll get back to it. I've been reading some easier stuff in the meantime. Currently reading Paul Auster's New York Trilogy. So far I like it, sort of plays with the detective genre without losing the suspense angle.
Hosin' out the cab of his pickup truck
He's got his 8-track playin' really fuckin' loud

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2818 on: August 30, 2017, 04:54:57 PM »
currently embroiled in 'american hookup: the new culture of sex on campus'.
it's dece. apparently women ruled courtship and were the more 'horny' of the sexes until very recently. thanks to marketing we now have the narrative that men are biological dogs and women are sposedta be chaste [until the free love 60s] but prior to that women picked the men.
usedta be that 'going steady' was considered subversive and teachers discouraged it, wanted kids to make out w/ several partners [but not settle/sleep w/ one].
interesting how mores change from decade to decade and for every gain we make, a loss is sure to follow.

brycickle

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2819 on: August 30, 2017, 09:52:50 PM »
Getting ready to start this page turner.

 You and the D00D have turned this thread into a horrible head-on-collision between a short bus full of retarded kids and a van full of paraplegics.