Author Topic: books to read  (Read 247502 times)

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Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2820 on: August 31, 2017, 05:03:13 AM »
Trying to get back into reading with this one.


oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2821 on: August 31, 2017, 08:13:59 AM »
20matar: super interesting to see how people get different things from the same text. I'm glad you liked it though!  I have been reading super slowly lately but I'd like to try to pick up her short stories again. Maybe I'll try to weave that better into my daily routine.

Finally finished On Nietzsche by Bataille after a few months at it (which I knew was going to be the case).  I wanted to get into some fiction but instead am going to start reading this business book Sensemaking by Christian Madsbjerg. He runs this ethnographic and humanities-based strategy & consulting firm that I'm really interested in. I've applied to work there a few times with no luck but I really like that he appreciates and incorporates sociological/anthropolical theory into his work which is sorely needed. I've read his first book that's in a similar vein and it was a very quick read so I'm hoping this will be the same.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 09:26:11 PM by oyolar »

six newell

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2822 on: August 31, 2017, 02:13:12 PM »

Grampa

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2823 on: September 03, 2017, 08:41:12 PM »
I'm not a huge reader, so I feel like I'm always just breaking the surface of books I'm "supposed" to read, or whatever. Anyways, I read The Stranger by Albert Camus a couple of weeks ago and loved it. I finished it in a few hours because I had a free afternoon.

Then I started reading Orwell's Homage to Catalonia, but put it down a quarter of the way through. I realized I don't like reading about war or military shit any more than I like watching movies about it. Just bores me to death.

Since I had good luck with Camus, I picked up The Fall and am gonna get busy with that.



shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2824 on: September 18, 2017, 09:31:42 AM »
charlamagne the god's 'black privilege' is changing my life. i'm burning bridges w/ whoever don't enrich my life and i'm inspired to write a love story about a drone bee and a varroa mite if brix or someone will illustrate it.

Alan

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2825 on: September 18, 2017, 03:38:52 PM »
Currently reading this collection of oral histories from Port-au-Prince. It's heavy, but also inspirational.

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SFblah

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2826 on: September 18, 2017, 07:52:49 PM »

I have this on the shelf and hope to start it soon. Heard lots of good things. I read his Box Man which was fuckin' weird.

I'm not a huge reader, so I feel like I'm always just breaking the surface of books I'm "supposed" to read, or whatever. Anyways, I read The Stranger by Albert Camus a couple of weeks ago and loved it. I finished it in a few hours because I had a free afternoon.

Then I started reading Orwell's Homage to Catalonia, but put it down a quarter of the way through. I realized I don't like reading about war or military shit any more than I like watching movies about it. Just bores me to death.

Since I had good luck with Camus, I picked up The Fall and am gonna get busy with that.


The Fall is great. Some great lines in that one.

Thrillho

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2827 on: September 19, 2017, 12:55:23 PM »
I read about 40 pages of The Fall. This guy I work with traded me for The Story of The Eye.

I kept thinking I was reading some weird choose your own adventure/dating sim dialogue sitting at a bar having to endure this old guy telling me all this personal stuff about himself and walking me home.

Guy Ferrari

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2828 on: September 21, 2017, 05:11:36 PM »


just started reading this. dig his style

Guy Ferrari

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2829 on: September 21, 2017, 05:14:00 PM »
if I'm not being serious and I'm playing into my "character" this one:


Gay Imp Sausage Metal

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2830 on: September 21, 2017, 07:50:52 PM »


just started reading this. dig his style
so it goes

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Mystical Leader

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2831 on: September 22, 2017, 06:55:09 AM »
I've been reading Blaise Pascal's de l'esprit g?om?trique, i don't whats it called in English. Really nice stuff about philosophy. Also read Satres Nausea, which was nice and helped me understand some thoughts I've had about my early twenties.

Also do you pals have any thoughts about David Foster Wallace? Google owned mediums have been recommending his stuff lately.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2832 on: September 22, 2017, 12:08:41 PM »
I've read all of his non-fiction collections and really enjoyed them but didn't find the stories in Brief Interviews with Hideous Men that memorable. I really disliked The Broom of the System too.  Just super young and pretentiously postmodern (as opposed to someone like Pynchon who feels like he's having fun with it).  However, I have heard from people in this thread and elsewhere that Infinite Jest is leaps and bounds better than his other work so keep that in mind.  I still intend on reading IJ at some point but haven't had the urge to tackle a 1,000+ page novel lately.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2833 on: September 24, 2017, 11:56:14 AM »
I'm not a huge reader, so I feel like I'm always just breaking the surface of books I'm "supposed" to read, or whatever. Anyways, I read The Stranger by Albert Camus a couple of weeks ago and loved it. I finished it in a few hours because I had a free afternoon.

Then I started reading Orwell's Homage to Catalonia, but put it down a quarter of the way through. I realized I don't like reading about war or military shit any more than I like watching movies about it. Just bores me to death.

Since I had good luck with Camus, I picked up The Fall and am gonna get busy with that.


Nice! Camus was one of the authors I started with, too. How was The Fall? If you dig Camus, I can recommend The Plague.

Just finished this gem by Erich Kaestner:



Der Gang vor die Hunde (translates as "Going down the drain") is the original version of Fabian: The Story of a Moralist, which was censored prior to its publication in 1931. It's all about sex, parties, and unemployment before shit hits the fan and World War II and the Nazis take over. Kaestner is also dealing with questions of morality vs. opportunism. Fabian, the protagonist, is a total badass who's giving his last pennies to the homeless but talks shit to the rich and powerful.

If you only know Kaestner as an author of children's books, you might want to reconsider.

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2834 on: September 24, 2017, 12:02:31 PM »
i'm 2/3 through 'we were the future: a memoir of the kibbutz'. now i'm no fan of israel whatsoever but i can get into anyone's story. these kibbutzes were on arab land, kind of the settlers/squatters of today and they were run by secular and socialist jews of israel, hungarian and french lineage.
as a farmer aspects of this really are romantic to me and the kids are raised together away from the biological parents which i can get behind. now if they aren't religious then why do they feel owed the land? some justifications are that 'blood was spilled so it's like an investment' and i spose the crips and bloods feel the same way.
so i'm reading it through my filter of being against it while being intrigued by the lifestyle. [it's also dated so perhaps back then the fighting wasn't so one sided].

the snake

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2835 on: September 24, 2017, 12:21:49 PM »
I've readen "the stranger" from camus, twas a good read after haven't read any books for years, very immersing
now I've started 'the road" from cormac McCarthy, kinda slow at the moment(just a few pages in it, for days), couldn't find "blood meridian"at my local library

Jumping Beans

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2836 on: September 24, 2017, 01:31:08 PM »
Recently read The Secret, The Subtle Art Of Not Giving A Fuck, and a collection of short stories by Dave Eggers, How We Are Hungry.  Currently reading Into The Wild.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2837 on: September 24, 2017, 01:36:45 PM »
I've readen "the stranger" from camus, twas a good read after haven't read any books for years, very immersing
now I've started 'the road" from cormac McCarthy, kinda slow at the moment(just a few pages in it, for days), couldn't find "blood meridian"at my local library

I liked The Road a lot more than Blood Meridian but both have absolutely gorgeous endings.

20matar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2838 on: September 24, 2017, 05:18:46 PM »
The only Wallace book I thorougly enjoyed was Infinite Jest. Sometimes I wonder if it's because of or despite a number of things. All of the post-modern shenanigans just fit the novel, but, in the short-story collections, or even on the non-fiction collections, can feel like a gimmick, like a show of virtuosism. A quick comparison that I can make is between the version of "A supposedly fun thing..." you can find in the Harper's magazine, and the full-fledged version you can find in your anthology of choice. While the footnotes feel like a fun quirk on the magazine article, it's just too much on the one Wallace had "free-reign" on. And that's too bad. Infinite Jest is not a good novel because it's clever: it's a good novel because it's human, because it's spot-on even (especially) when it's silly and whimsical, and because it's so human, so powerful as a story. Not because it requires two bookmarks. That's my opinion, at least. I certainly won't go after The Broom of the System after Oyolar's two cents, that's for sure. And I'm not exactly sold on The Pale King...

I feel like re-reading Cormac McCarthy lately. My brother is reading The Road, on his own pace, though. No Country for Old Men is, in my opinion, one of the rare cases where the movie is much better than the book. Blood Meridian was an absolute shocker and I feel I haven't gotten enough from it. But, if I have to re-read a terrifying "western", then I have to focus on getting a proper read on Guimaraes Rosa instead. The Devil to Pay in the Backlands. To use the famous Wikipedia Weasel Words, "some argue" that it's the greatest Brazilian novel ever. I honestly can't suggest a better one, but the language is insanely difficult and the text has no chapter breaks, or even chunk-sized paragraphs. It's rambling and rambling until the "crossing [infinite sign]". And it's wonderful. Marginally less bloody than the Meridian, and definitely a lot more gay, until people pretended it wasn't the case until quite recently. Now it can be told -- if you can stomach spoilers. If I was made of time, I'd reread them both.

Lately, I tried to read As I Lay Dying, by Faulkner. It's definitely a "funny" book, but it's so dark and overwhelming that I just couldn't finish it, despite having plenty of time for a enjoyable reading. His language is impenetrable, and you can never truly tell what the fuck is going on. The focus always stays close to the characters, and the characters themselves cannot be truly accurate. So it's one weird narrative, even though the chapters are bite-sized ("My mother is a fish", anyone?). I'm at the end of my rope.

As for Camus... he is one author I read on my teens and that I definitely have to revisit. My most recent visit to his works was to watch the Luchino Visconti version of The Stranger. Which is a frustrating film adaption, not because it's "unfaithful" or anything: but rather, exactly because it is the novel, beat by beat by beat. Starring Marcelo Mastroianni as someone who is too much of a handsome hunk to, in my eyes, play the ever-so-distant "stranger" Mersault.  I have read Camus's The Plague, which I personally enjoyed a lot more than The Stranger, although that's like apples and oranges. Camus's writings on philosophy pretty much went over my head, as appealing as they are.


Grampa

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2839 on: September 24, 2017, 06:29:24 PM »
Ended up giving up on The Fall. Just wasn't feeling it. My days are long, tedious and boring, so I need a book that really grabs my attention if I wanna spend my nights reading. I'll probably give it another shot next time I'm on vacation or something.

Im about to start reading The Big Sleep tonight which I'm pretty excited about.

Willie

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2840 on: September 24, 2017, 07:29:56 PM »

Then I started reading Orwell's Homage to Catalonia, but put it down a quarter of the way through. I realized I don't like reading about war or military shit any more than I like watching movies about it. Just bores me to death.



I didn't think Homage was much of a page turner myself. Down And Out In Paris And London is a more relatable book of the same ilk. If you never read it in school, 1984 is completely worth it and I'd also recommend Coming Up For Air.

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2841 on: September 24, 2017, 09:53:26 PM »
As for Camus... he is one author I read on my teens and that I definitely have to revisit. My most recent visit to his works was to watch the Luchino Visconti version of The Stranger. Which is a frustrating film adaption, not because it's "unfaithful" or anything: but rather, exactly because it is the novel, beat by beat by beat. Starring Marcelo Mastroianni as someone who is too much of a handsome hunk to, in my eyes, play the ever-so-distant "stranger" Mersault.  I have read Camus's The Plague, which I personally enjoyed a lot more than The Stranger, although that's like apples and oranges. Camus's writings on philosophy pretty much went over my head, as appealing as they are.

I think Mersault was supposed to be handsome.
And at any rate, I don't think that being handsome saves one from feeling alienated in society. In fact, many (if not most) of the sociopaths I have met have been beautiful people (but this begs the question: was Mersault a sociopath? Certainly that wasn't Camus' point?)

Alan

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2842 on: September 26, 2017, 04:52:06 AM »
Im about to start reading The Big Sleep tonight which I'm pretty excited about.

Yes! Raymond Chandler is the best crime writer, imho. I reread all of his stuff every couple of years, which I never normally do.
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bea!

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2843 on: September 26, 2017, 07:56:30 PM »
Im about to start reading The Big Sleep tonight which I'm pretty excited about.

Yes! Raymond Chandler is the best crime writer, imho. I reread all of his stuff every couple of years, which I never normally do.

I can also suggest some Jim Thompson if you really want a story that's gonna pull you in and keep you there.  He's my #1 crime writer hands down.

Just picked up Slaughterhouse 5.... been having people tell me about Vonnegut for decades so figured I should give him a shot. 

Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2844 on: September 27, 2017, 05:12:36 AM »
What's something you could suggest me if I like both Kurt Vonnegut and Irvine Welsh? Besides more Vonnegut and Welsh.
An inspiring and funny page-turner..

Jumping Beans

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2845 on: September 27, 2017, 08:01:49 AM »
Not sure if it fully fits into the Vonnegut/Welsh category, but there's one by Kerouac/Burroughs called And The Hippos Were Boiled In Their Tanks that was funny/dark/enjoyable.

Tried to read Glue by Welsh and just couldn't handle the Irish pronunciation style writing which makes up most of the book.  Was too busy deciphering words to enjoy the story. 

Also gave up on The Sound Of Fury by Faulker, which is supposed to be a classic, but was mostly incoherent run on sentences.  With the exception of the first part, written from the point of view of a mentally disabled 33 yr old farm boy.  That was a challenging and interesting read.

Currently reading Winter Of Our Discontent by John Steinbeck.. A little depressing so far but definitely some beautiful writing in there.

Grampa

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2846 on: September 27, 2017, 09:43:26 PM »
Im about to start reading The Big Sleep tonight which I'm pretty excited about.

Yes! Raymond Chandler is the best crime writer, imho. I reread all of his stuff every couple of years, which I never normally do.

I can also suggest some Jim Thompson if you really want a story that's gonna pull you in and keep you there.  He's my #1 crime writer hands down.

Just picked up Slaughterhouse 5.... been having people tell me about Vonnegut for decades so figured I should give him a shot. 

Jim Thompson is the best! Pop. 1280 and The Killer Inside Me are two of my favorite books without a doubt. This reminded me that I have The Grifters sitting on my shelf but have yet to read it.

As for Vonnegut, I highly recommend Breakfast Of Champions if you haven't already read it.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2847 on: September 28, 2017, 08:36:22 AM »
Since Vonnegut has come up, this podcast might interest you guys. Two of the people behind Cracked have a podcast discussing Vonnegut work. They're going through his books chronologically and their discussions are detailed and super in-depth but still fun and approachable since they take it from a fan perspective rather than a literary critic one. They're pretty far into the Vonnegut canon but they're good at explaining any callbacks to previous books and discussions so jump in wherever.  I read all of Vonneguts work but it was from the end of high school through my undergrad career so it's nice to get reminders of the stories and what I liked so much about them. https://soundcloud.com/kurtvonneguys
« Last Edit: October 11, 2017, 12:36:09 PM by oyolar »

themoustache

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2848 on: September 28, 2017, 03:49:49 PM »

Mark Renton

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2849 on: October 11, 2017, 03:28:38 AM »
Not sure if it fully fits into the Vonnegut/Welsh category, but there's one by Kerouac/Burroughs called And The Hippos Were Boiled In Their Tanks that was funny/dark/enjoyable.

Tried to read Glue by Welsh and just couldn't handle the Irish pronunciation style writing which makes up most of the book.  Was too busy deciphering words to enjoy the story. 


Thank you! I will order it, for now I'll jump on the slap favorite SlaughterhouseV since it was the only decent one in the small english section en la libreria here.
Welsh books are wrote in scottish slang but it's not so bad once you get used to it, after that it's pure enjoyment for me because I can remember one or two sayings and make them mine in a way.
Finished Filth by Welsh and it threw me in a bad mood for a good couple of days.