Author Topic: books to read  (Read 246930 times)

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franquietits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2910 on: March 28, 2018, 11:45:36 PM »
Recently finished an old book from school:


His colorful language, the stories of struggle, tragedy, dreams, ethnic identity -- fuck! It was a memorable, touching one for me. I feel like i'm friends will all the characters, almost.   

SFblah

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2911 on: March 29, 2018, 07:00:27 PM »
Just finished this which was amazing. The story, as well as the title, makes me think it could be a Tarantino movie one day.


Kumiko

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2912 on: March 31, 2018, 01:56:06 AM »
Recently read Bob Miller's Tales of the Los Angeles Kings, Songs of a Dead Dreamer and Grimscribe by Thomas Ligotti, and The Dominance Bond by Leonard Klossner.

I loved Tales of the Los Angeles Kings, but it'd probably suck if you're not a Kings fan. Songs of a Dead Dreamer and Grimscribe were cool. Most stories were really fun and developed a nice horror vibe, while a few were stinkers. The Dominance Bond was alright at best. It's one of those books where every character is annoying and it seems the purpose of the novel is to evoke contempt. It does it well and Klossner shouldn't be criticized for that, since characters that are bad people doesn't necessitate they are bad characters. It just isn't the kind of thing I'm into.

I'm currently reading Satantango by Laszlo Krasznahorkai and Rashomon and Seventeen Other Stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa.

Krasznahorkai's style is pretty interesting since he doesn't use paragraph breaks at all. Each chapter is one long, continuous paragraph that spans 20-30 pages. His sentences are also really long and seem to go on for a page at a time. Somehow though, it still works without seeming overly wordy or rambling. The plot's pretty rad although a bit slow moving and most of the main events seem rooted in Hegelian thought. It's a really good book so far. Akutagawa's stories are decent and an enjoyable way to kill short periods of time.

Probably going to read Dead Souls by Nikolay Gogol next.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2913 on: April 01, 2018, 12:56:29 PM »
I read Satantango on a whim and it's super intense while also being funny and not overly dense.  It's a really difficult mix that it's very impressive he's able to pull off.

Just finished Intimations by Alexandra Kleeman.  It's a short story collection and I'm not usually super into those but it was really good.  She's very surrealist almost.  Like, strange things happen but they don't feel out of place - just like realistic things notched up to their extreme but logical conclusion.  It's very good at evoking what she wants you to evoke.  Her debut You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine was my favorite book I read last year so I highly recommend picking that up but I've heard it's not for everyone too.

I'm taking a critical theory course for fun so going to be reading Bataille, de Sade, and a bunch of critical theorists and philosophers who engage with their work.  So I'm excited for that since I don't get to do much analysis or discussion on them with other people even though I'd like to.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 03:41:51 PM by oyolar »

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2914 on: April 01, 2018, 01:13:15 PM »
'junk raft' is a bummer. it's about a former marine and a friend sailing a ship made of plastic bottles, an airplane fusillade and other trash to bring attention to litter. kinda like shooting a kid to bring attention to violence in schools?
idk.
but the facts of the book are a big drag and make me aware of plastic waste [which is all plastic at some point] and how it never goes away and the oil companies [big plastic] have a vested interest in us incinerating, pseudo-recycling [only about 8% gets downcycled into new plastic crap] and buying more. gonna try not to get styrofoam coffee cups anymore but still. organic smoothies, urethane wheels, everything in life comes from petroleum.

Grind King Rims

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2915 on: April 02, 2018, 12:29:24 PM »
This is one of my threads where I'll gnar anyone that contributes :)
Thanks for posting everyone


"Strictly for the culture" - Brian Wenning 2017

Tongue punching the Life Gnar button since 2011.

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2916 on: April 02, 2018, 09:40:36 PM »

I'm taking a critical theory course for fun so going to be reading Bataille, de Sade, and a bunch of critical theorists and philosophers who engage with their work.  So I'm excited for that since I don't get to do much analysis or discussion on them with other people even though I'd like to.

Good on ye. Hope it's a meaningful experience for you (the class) and I wouldn't mind an update once you get into it!

*edit: Reading this one for a class of my own. More excited than usual to get at it.
Read on, readers!
« Last Edit: April 03, 2018, 10:15:44 AM by Peter Zagreus »

Andmoreagain

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2917 on: April 03, 2018, 07:07:06 AM »
Reading The Three Body Problem and loving it.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2918 on: April 04, 2018, 09:29:21 AM »

I'm taking a critical theory course for fun so going to be reading Bataille, de Sade, and a bunch of critical theorists and philosophers who engage with their work.  So I'm excited for that since I don't get to do much analysis or discussion on them with other people even though I'd like to.

Good on ye. Hope it's a meaningful experience for you (the class) and I wouldn't mind an update once you get into it!

*edit: Reading this one for a class of my own. More excited than usual to get at it.
Read on, readers!

Thanks man! Yeah, I'll definitely give an update. First class is Thursday and it's 3 hours every Thursday this month.  I'm stoked but like weirdly nervous too. I've got a fascination with Bataille and am like "What if I'm not getting enough out of him and my observations are like super trite?"

behavioralguide

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2919 on: April 04, 2018, 10:39:04 AM »
anyone read 2666 and how does it compares to Savage Detectives? both by Roberto Bolano.

geneparmesan

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2920 on: April 04, 2018, 10:53:05 AM »
On the topic of Murakami, if you read enough of his work you start to notice he's been writing the same book over and over for years now. And it's not a bad book certainly, it's brought him a lot of acclaim and attention, but he essentially mixes and matches different elements to differing degrees of success.

Here's a handy check list to keep score:


If you're going to read him, I'd recommend the classics "A Wild Sheep Chase," "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World," "Kafka on the Shore," and his first collection of short stories "The Elephant Vanishes."

Paul Auster is similar and also does the same thing, but instead of using noir and fantasy elements, he uses coincidence and metaficiction. He has dabbled in noir a bit though, mainly the first book in "The New York Trilogy," which is the only book of the three worth reading. Of his other work, "Leviathan," "Moon Palace," and "The Book of Illusions" are pretty solid.

Both of these guys focus on young male protagonists who are figuring out their place in the world, and as a result often appeal to young men figuring out their place in the world. This is not to say their work isn't worth reading, more so that as you get older and figure your shit out, you may find your appreciation of their stuff declining.

Anyway, since this is a recommendation thread, Jack Black's (not that one) autobiography of life as a freight hopping hobo turned thief and safe cracker in San Francisco during the late 1800s and early 1900s is one of the best books I've ever read. The amount of life this guy experiences, and his ability to write a relatable yet mind blowing book about the hobo underworld and all its various facets makes for an unputdownable book.


shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2921 on: April 04, 2018, 11:07:39 AM »
i loved that jack black book!
yeggs and hobos and jailbreaking.

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2922 on: April 04, 2018, 05:43:14 PM »

I'm taking a critical theory course for fun so going to be reading Bataille, de Sade, and a bunch of critical theorists and philosophers who engage with their work.  So I'm excited for that since I don't get to do much analysis or discussion on them with other people even though I'd like to.

Good on ye. Hope it's a meaningful experience for you (the class) and I wouldn't mind an update once you get into it!

*edit: Reading this one for a class of my own. More excited than usual to get at it.
Read on, readers!

Thanks man! Yeah, I'll definitely give an update. First class is Thursday and it's 3 hours every Thursday this month.  I'm stoked but like weirdly nervous too. I've got a fascination with Bataille and am like "What if I'm not getting enough out of him and my observations are like super trite?"
I'd feel that way too, going into it. I checked a Bataille reader (one of those Blackwell editions, I think?) out of the library and read the intro essay and sort of skimmed around. I was trying to feel out his conception of "base materialism," but I can't say I got very far before my energies were needed elsewhere. Hope to come back to him.

ShredWilliams

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2923 on: April 04, 2018, 05:48:57 PM »
anyone read 2666 and how does it compares to Savage Detectives? both by Roberto Bolano.

2666 is an incredible book. It’s the only Bolano I’ve read though.

To geneparmesan, I’ve only read the “New York Trilogy” and “1234” by Auster. I thought “New York Trilogy “ was about linguistics and epistemology more than noir. It was hardly a detective/crime novel.

de Sade is a kook.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2924 on: April 04, 2018, 06:25:02 PM »
Why do you say that about de Sade?

geneparmesan

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2925 on: April 04, 2018, 08:03:55 PM »
To geneparmesan, I’ve only read the “New York Trilogy” and “1234” by Auster. I thought “New York Trilogy “ was about linguistics and epistemology more than noir. It was hardly a detective/crime novel.

Totally agree. I should have been clearer about that. It's far from a noir novel, just uses some of the tropes of it and is the best example of Auster's use of that kind of thing.

CrumblingInfrastructure

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2926 on: April 04, 2018, 11:52:38 PM »
Havent been reading much lately but my favorites of all time are....
JD Salinger - 9 Stories
Fantastic collection of short stories that are all intertwined the final story "Teddy" is probably one of my favorite pieces of literature of all time.
Cats Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut
Ice Nine baby
Philip K Dick - A Scanner Darkly
That quote about stealing insulin or just dying fucks me up every time
The Dark Elf Trilogy - RA Salvatore
One of the first big books I read. My Dad lent me the trilogy when I was 12 and crushed through it in a week.

For Comics...
Transmetropolitan (finished)
Preacher (finished)
Planetary Express (finished)
DMZ (almost finished)
Doom Patrol (just started)
Wanted (finished)

Bunch of others but i'll keep it short.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2927 on: April 07, 2018, 02:32:54 AM »
anyone read 2666 and how does it compares to Savage Detectives? both by Roberto Bolano.

Reading Bolano? Good on ya!

I'm a big Bolano fan and I've read both. In my eyes, 2666 is very different from the Savage Detectives. The overall writing style is comparable and both share a few themes and motifs, but that's about it. The Savage Detectives is a typical "young Bolano", full of dark humor, the energy and romanticism of youth and covering every topic relevant to 70s and 80s Latin America and world literature. 2666 seems more focused, more mature, more limited but also lacks the energy and fervor of the Savage Detectives. It's a typical "late work" and way darker than the Savage Detectives.

Personally, I liked the Savage Detectives better, but 2666 is still among my favorite books. Both are really good. I'd say, you should go for it! Have fun!
« Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 04:11:56 AM by AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice »

SFblah

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2928 on: April 07, 2018, 08:19:56 AM »
anyone read 2666 and how does it compares to Savage Detectives? both by Roberto Bolano.

Reading Bolano? Good on ya!

I'm a big Bolano fan and I've read both. In my eyes, 2666 is very different from the Savage Detectives. The overall writing style is comparable and both share a few themes and motifs, but that's about it. The Savage Detectives is a typical "young Bolano", full of dark humor, the energy and romanticism of youth and covering every topic relevant to 70s and 80s Latin America and world literature. 2666 seems more focused, more mature, more limited but also lacks the energy and fervor of the Savage Detectives. It's a typical "late work" and way darker than the Savage Detectives.

Personally, I liked the Savage Detectives better, but 2666 is still among my favorite books. Both are really good. I'd say, you should go for it! Have fun!

So far I’ve only read Bolano’s Distant Star and Nazi Literature in the Americas[i/]. Two Spanish guys own a bookstore here and they tell me his short stories are his best work.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2929 on: April 07, 2018, 01:33:39 PM »
anyone read 2666 and how does it compares to Savage Detectives? both by Roberto Bolano.

Reading Bolano? Good on ya!

I'm a big Bolano fan and I've read both. In my eyes, 2666 is very different from the Savage Detectives. The overall writing style is comparable and both share a few themes and motifs, but that's about it. The Savage Detectives is a typical "young Bolano", full of dark humor, the energy and romanticism of youth and covering every topic relevant to 70s and 80s Latin America and world literature. 2666 seems more focused, more mature, more limited but also lacks the energy and fervor of the Savage Detectives. It's a typical "late work" and way darker than the Savage Detectives.

Personally, I liked the Savage Detectives better, but 2666 is still among my favorite books. Both are really good. I'd say, you should go for it! Have fun!

So far I’ve only read Bolano’s Distant Star and Nazi Literature in the Americas[i/]. Two Spanish guys own a bookstore here and they tell me his short stories are his best work.

I've only ready one of his short story collections and I liked it a lot, but I still think Savage Detectives is Bolano at his best. Distant Star is another favorite.

Finished Austerlitz by W.G. Sebald and Orient Express by John Dos Passos recently. Austerlitz took some getting used to, but the effort paid off about halfway through. I'm really into the Middle East and its history right now, so Orient Express was super interesting to me. Dos Passos travelled through today's Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Iran, Iraq and Syria right after WWI and the subsequent downfall of the Ottoman Empire, when these states and their borders were just drawn. Dos Passos has a really good eye for detail and I like his style. Screw On the Road, this is the real shit for hopeless romantics who were bitten by the travel bug.

Onto Knausgaard's My Struggle 3 now. It's the last book from the series I haven't read (apart from the last part to be published this fall of course). Not really feeling it yet. I'm so much used to "adult" Knausgaard, that I have a hard time adapting to the child version. Let's see how this one goes...
« Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 01:38:18 PM by AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice »

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2930 on: April 07, 2018, 02:52:24 PM »
I know what you mean but I loved Book 3.  It's super atmospheric and I think he does a great job giving you the feeling of what it felt like to be a child in his childhood situation.  That said, I couldn't imagine reading it after Books 4 & 5.  It would definitely be jarring.

tortfeasor

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2931 on: April 09, 2018, 07:48:23 AM »
Recently finished an old book from school:


His colorful language, the stories of struggle, tragedy, dreams, ethnic identity -- fuck! It was a memorable, touching one for me. I feel like i'm friends will all the characters, almost.   

Gnar'd for sherman alexie.  there are so few writers who can make books that appeal to all ages.


just finished a book that really met the hype.




i dont know why it took my so long to get to this but its probably for the best because if i had read this when i was 17 i would probably would have ended up like the protagonist in the least romantic way possible.   if you are looking for a  visceral and visual quick read that will make you feel guilty about how un-free you are, this is a great choice to pick up.

Robert Baratheon

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2932 on: April 09, 2018, 09:25:07 AM »
Havent been reading much lately but my favorites of all time are....
JD Salinger - 9 Stories
Fantastic collection of short stories that are all intertwined the final story "Teddy" is probably one of my favorite pieces of literature of all time.

For Esme... is my favorite but they are all great.

shark tits

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2933 on: April 09, 2018, 09:36:23 AM »
sherman alexie is sick! i've read a few of his books about indians getting drunk and playing ball on the rez. he usedta be in the seattle wkly too 100 yrs ago when i lived out there.
'when the women come out to dance' by elmore leonard was good. book of short stories including 'fire in the hole' which the tv show justified is based on.

behavioralguide

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2934 on: April 09, 2018, 09:43:35 AM »
anyone read 2666 and how does it compares to Savage Detectives? both by Roberto Bolano.

Reading Bolano? Good on ya!

I'm a big Bolano fan and I've read both. In my eyes, 2666 is very different from the Savage Detectives. The overall writing style is comparable and both share a few themes and motifs, but that's about it. The Savage Detectives is a typical "young Bolano", full of dark humor, the energy and romanticism of youth and covering every topic relevant to 70s and 80s Latin America and world literature. 2666 seems more focused, more mature, more limited but also lacks the energy and fervor of the Savage Detectives. It's a typical "late work" and way darker than the Savage Detectives.

Personally, I liked the Savage Detectives better, but 2666 is still among my favorite books. Both are really good. I'd say, you should go for it! Have fun!

So far I’ve only read Bolano’s Distant Star and Nazi Literature in the Americas. Two Spanish guys own a bookstore here and they tell me his short stories are his best work.

I've only ready one of his short story collections and I liked it a lot, but I still think Savage Detectives is Bolano at his best. Distant Star is another favorite.

yea i read nazi literature in the Americas and third reich. The 1st i wasnt too into until the last chapter or so. But maybe just because I was hoping for something more plot-driven. It made me wanna write again tho so thats a +.

Third reich was good but felt a bit "easy" compared to Savage Detectives, although interesting in alot of ways i.e. How he keeps writing some versions of himself into every novel.

Wanted to buy Distant star instead of Third Reich but was low on money and the latter is more book for the same cash... Was happy Distant star kinda appeared in the last chapter of Nazi Literature, and it really made me want to read all his books to see how they all fit together.

Either way thanks for the 2666 vs Detectives awnswer


AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2935 on: April 09, 2018, 01:26:49 PM »
I know what you mean but I loved Book 3.  It's super atmospheric and I think he does a great job giving you the feeling of what it felt like to be a child in his childhood situation.  That said, I couldn't imagine reading it after Books 4 & 5.  It would definitely be jarring.

Yes. Picking up Book 3 after 4&5 feels like reading a prequel. Which is nice but also doesn't feel like the real deal. Anyway, last night while reading Book 3, I feel like it started growing on me. I see exactly what you mean. Knausgaard does a really good job at describing small details you felt as a kid. Like how every tree in your vicinity acquires a specific meaning. It also helps you to understand the father-son-dynamic more profoundly.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2936 on: April 09, 2018, 01:34:06 PM »
anyone read 2666 and how does it compares to Savage Detectives? both by Roberto Bolano.

Reading Bolano? Good on ya!

I'm a big Bolano fan and I've read both. In my eyes, 2666 is very different from the Savage Detectives. The overall writing style is comparable and both share a few themes and motifs, but that's about it. The Savage Detectives is a typical "young Bolano", full of dark humor, the energy and romanticism of youth and covering every topic relevant to 70s and 80s Latin America and world literature. 2666 seems more focused, more mature, more limited but also lacks the energy and fervor of the Savage Detectives. It's a typical "late work" and way darker than the Savage Detectives.

Personally, I liked the Savage Detectives better, but 2666 is still among my favorite books. Both are really good. I'd say, you should go for it! Have fun!

So far I’ve only read Bolano’s Distant Star and Nazi Literature in the Americas. Two Spanish guys own a bookstore here and they tell me his short stories are his best work.

I've only ready one of his short story collections and I liked it a lot, but I still think Savage Detectives is Bolano at his best. Distant Star is another favorite.

yea i read nazi literature in the Americas and third reich. The 1st i wasnt too into until the last chapter or so. But maybe just because I was hoping for something more plot-driven. It made me wanna write again tho so thats a +.

Third reich was good but felt a bit "easy" compared to Savage Detectives, although interesting in alot of ways i.e. How he keeps writing some versions of himself into every novel.

Wanted to buy Distant star instead of Third Reich but was low on money and the latter is more book for the same cash... Was happy Distant star kinda appeared in the last chapter of Nazi Literature, and it really made me want to read all his books to see how they all fit together.

Either way thanks for the 2666 vs Detectives awnswer

I see. The last chapter of Nazi Literature in the Americas covers the very rough plot of Distant Star, excluding character development and atmosphere. Apart from Savage Detectives, Distant Star is maybe my favorite Bolano. This is what made me pick up a copy:

http://www.jenkemmag.com/home/2014/11/10/books-for-lazy-skateboarders-and-people-that-dont-like-to-read/

I also like Third Reich by the way. It's super weird though, even for Bolano standards.

Are you going to start 2666?

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2937 on: April 09, 2018, 04:13:49 PM »
^ Distant Star for the win. Haven't gotten around to 2666 though. One day...

Revisiting this gem in my spare time. I couldn't recommend it more. Honestly one of my top 3 novels, all time. Dark, Irish absurdism at its finest.

behavioralguide

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2938 on: April 09, 2018, 05:33:03 PM »
yea dont get me wrong, i liked Third Reich (alot).
and as soon as i get my hands on 2666 (and they're holding any cash, Im not a book stealer, which is in this day and age something completely different then when bolano grew up, with the dissapearing bookshops nowadays) will read yes.

Its a shame I dont speak spanish. South American literature has got me hooked, but so many gems untranslated

behavioralguide

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Re: books to read
« Reply #2939 on: April 09, 2018, 05:56:16 PM »
also re-read
Yusuf Atilgan's The Loiterer, If you've ever been to Istanbul, you undoubtly enjoy this one; A man alone in a city, contemplating his differences with contemporary (at the time) Turkish culture, while chasing women and searching a woman:

and I read Bill Callahan's Letters to Emma Bowlcut; the story isn't all that much, Its a succession of letters to a woman, but you never get to read the replies. She does reply however, since Callahan refers to them and awnsers her questions in his own letters to her. Its interesting and if you enjoy his songwriting/ observations/ humour then its a good read and I find myself opening the book at random and re-reading letters.