Author Topic: Spitfire formula four  (Read 217516 times)

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N.L.

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1290 on: April 29, 2016, 03:48:28 PM »
alrighty, the right dudes have asked. i reckon i've got a few more weeks left on these 99s and then i'll set my 101s up. i'll film a blunt silde on both sets and we'll see what science says. advance warning, my blunt slides will almost certainly be on a curb and  they will most certainly be self-filmed on my crIphone.

johnes

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1291 on: April 30, 2016, 08:22:39 AM »
I was thinking the 101s might not slide as well as the 99s i had, but they do and are great. I'm glad i made the move up from 52 to 54. I've been sliding thorugh everything and sometimes leaving cool green marks lol.


Hannity

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1292 on: April 30, 2016, 09:21:21 AM »
had to scoop more 58mm conical fulls after my last set-up got jacked at a local school (stupid me for forgetting it. anybody else have weekend sessions with the homies hauling a bunch of shit around from spot to spot and lose stuff along the way?) best fucking wheels ever. nothing holds u back.


N.L.

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1293 on: April 30, 2016, 09:45:17 AM »
I was thinking the 101s might not slide as well as the 99s i had, but they do and are great. I'm glad i made the move up from 52 to 54. I've been sliding thorugh everything and sometimes leaving cool green marks lol.



Those are the ones I'm about to set up. How does the roll feel on rough streets compared to the 99s?

johnes

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1294 on: April 30, 2016, 10:46:26 PM »
Quote

Those are the ones I'm about to set up. How does the roll feel on rough streets compared to the 99s?
I don't think I've ridden on anything too rough that I can recall in recent memory.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 11:09:24 AM by johnes »

Farz

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1295 on: April 30, 2016, 11:31:22 PM »
Picked up some radial slims and new bronsons and upon putting the spacers in one of the bearings will slide slightly out of the bearing seat. It's not enough to cause it to become loose but it's not flush (maybe like 1mm on 1 bearing) and I have been wondering if it'd be more beneficial to ditch the spacers or just use it like it is or even order some slimmer spacers?

144p

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1296 on: May 01, 2016, 10:26:08 AM »
I would try over tightening you wheel by a turn then backing it off.
Maybe they aren't seated all the way.
Either way the bearing sticking out won't affect the ride.
I still ride spacers, but not sure if it really does anything.

LennyDLXSF

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1297 on: May 02, 2016, 02:34:13 PM »
Picked up some radial slims and new bronsons and upon putting the spacers in one of the bearings will slide slightly out of the bearing seat. It's not enough to cause it to become loose but it's not flush (maybe like 1mm on 1 bearing) and I have been wondering if it'd be more beneficial to ditch the spacers or just use it like it is or even order some slimmer spacers?

My opinion on bearing spacers is that they are completely unnecessary in most, if not all modern wheels.

They were created when wheels were much softer, and were designed to help keep the bearing (and bearing seat) aligned perpendicularly with the axel.

Since most wheels now are a much harder duro, or have harder cores below the softer urethane, I have not once found them to be beneficial in any modern skateboarding situation.


zephyrpatio

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1298 on: May 02, 2016, 02:51:46 PM »
had to scoop more 58mm conical fulls after my last set-up got jacked at a local school (stupid me for forgetting it. anybody else have weekend sessions with the homies hauling a bunch of shit around from spot to spot and lose stuff along the way?) best fucking wheels ever. nothing holds u back.


Gotta agree here. I picked up the 58's for a bowl setup but they're just an awesome wheel in general - wide and fast. They haul ass over any pavement. Do you use risers with yours out of curiosity?

Clang

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1299 on: May 02, 2016, 02:52:06 PM »
Has anyone skated the 54mm 99a conical fulls? I've been using the conical ones and now I want to try the wider ones. Is there really any major difference between the two riding surfaces?

BMCsteve

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1300 on: May 02, 2016, 02:52:13 PM »
Picked up some radial slims and new bronsons and upon putting the spacers in one of the bearings will slide slightly out of the bearing seat. It's not enough to cause it to become loose but it's not flush (maybe like 1mm on 1 bearing) and I have been wondering if it'd be more beneficial to ditch the spacers or just use it like it is or even order some slimmer spacers?

My opinion on bearing spacers is that they are completely unnecessary in most, if not all modern wheels.

They were created when wheels were much softer, and were designed to help keep the bearing (and bearing seat) aligned perpendicularly with the axel.

Since most wheels now are a much harder duro, or have harder cores below the softer urethane, I have not once found them to be beneficial in any modern skateboarding situation.



They're beneficial anytime your wheel has lateral movement - powerslides, landing sideways, reverts, etc.  

It distributes the torsional load across a larger surface as opposed to directly on the inner race.  That load is what leads to the bearing cage breaking which is the cause of most bearing blowouts
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 02:58:12 PM by BMCsteve »

144p

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1301 on: May 02, 2016, 03:31:47 PM »
Has anyone skated the 54mm 99a conical fulls? I've been using the conical ones and now I want to try the wider ones. Is there really any major difference between the two riding surfaces?
Just a little more surface area, so more stability, little less slide.

unerds

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1302 on: May 02, 2016, 03:49:38 PM »
Picked up some radial slims and new bronsons and upon putting the spacers in one of the bearings will slide slightly out of the bearing seat. It's not enough to cause it to become loose but it's not flush (maybe like 1mm on 1 bearing) and I have been wondering if it'd be more beneficial to ditch the spacers or just use it like it is or even order some slimmer spacers?

My opinion on bearing spacers is that they are completely unnecessary in most, if not all modern wheels.

They were created when wheels were much softer, and were designed to help keep the bearing (and bearing seat) aligned perpendicularly with the axel.

Since most wheels now are a much harder duro, or have harder cores below the softer urethane, I have not once found them to be beneficial in any modern skateboarding situation.



They're beneficial anytime your wheel has lateral movement - powerslides, landing sideways, reverts, etc. 

It distributes the torsional load across a larger surface as opposed to directly on the inner race.  That load is what leads to the bearing cage breaking which is the cause of most bearing blowouts

also, not a super important metric, but spacers allow (require - to get any real benefit out of them, really) you to tighten down the axle nut more, which reduces that rattling sound of your bearings moving between the hangar and the axle nut.

my setup just feels more solid with spacers and tighter axle nuts.

like, when it hits the ground, it's more of a solid smack; not a smack with that reverberating loose wheel sound...

Xen

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1303 on: May 02, 2016, 04:14:46 PM »
Picked up some radial slims and new bronsons and upon putting the spacers in one of the bearings will slide slightly out of the bearing seat. It's not enough to cause it to become loose but it's not flush (maybe like 1mm on 1 bearing) and I have been wondering if it'd be more beneficial to ditch the spacers or just use it like it is or even order some slimmer spacers?

My opinion on bearing spacers is that they are completely unnecessary in most, if not all modern wheels.

They were created when wheels were much softer, and were designed to help keep the bearing (and bearing seat) aligned perpendicularly with the axel.

Since most wheels now are a much harder duro, or have harder cores below the softer urethane, I have not once found them to be beneficial in any modern skateboarding situation.



I tend to agree, it's rare I run them, usually on new bearings if they come with them and most wheels will give you that 1mm slip either side if you use them. It's nice to be able to crank them down nice and tight tho.

Xen

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1304 on: May 03, 2016, 08:44:27 AM »
It's longboard-downhill reasoning, since speed is important to them, but still worth a read:





Level 60 Dwarf Paladin

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1305 on: May 03, 2016, 09:09:51 AM »
I feel like half of the thread is talking about spacers and the other half speed rings.
you never know about pre-cum 

N.L.

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1306 on: May 03, 2016, 11:12:26 AM »
without machine faced hangers and properly sized spacers they probably don't work as they should anyway.


Willie

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1307 on: May 03, 2016, 03:06:30 PM »
Since I have a hard time believing that my wheel core and the spacer are perfectly sized together, I don't use spacers.

Zimmer

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1308 on: May 03, 2016, 05:36:35 PM »
Since I have a hard time believing that my wheel core and the spacer are perfectly sized together, I don't use spacers.

This.

The best bet seems to be running speed rings, with no spacers.

Esquivel

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1309 on: May 04, 2016, 05:50:47 AM »
Picked up some radial slims and new bronsons and upon putting the spacers in one of the bearings will slide slightly out of the bearing seat. It's not enough to cause it to become loose but it's not flush (maybe like 1mm on 1 bearing) and I have been wondering if it'd be more beneficial to ditch the spacers or just use it like it is or even order some slimmer spacers?

My opinion on bearing spacers is that they are completely unnecessary in most, if not all modern wheels.

They were created when wheels were much softer, and were designed to help keep the bearing (and bearing seat) aligned perpendicularly with the axel.

Since most wheels now are a much harder duro, or have harder cores below the softer urethane, I have not once found them to be beneficial in any modern skateboarding situation.



from personal experience, if the spacer is slightly wider than needed then the wheels are going to get damaged no matter what and this alone is a good enough reason not to ever use spacers. The bearing sockets will become slack because the wheel will constantly keep moving/slipping sideways left and right as you skate. I dont know if i made myself clear here with my shitty eglish.
in modern skateboards spacers are only beneficial if you start getting slipping axle because when incorporated within the wheel/bearing system they work as a "limit" for the axle's motion.
Chusticiero/Fuma chustas - Person who smokes the end of the joint.

duzerdrof

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1310 on: May 04, 2016, 08:31:48 PM »
Has anyone skated the 54mm 99a conical fulls? I've been using the conical ones and now I want to try the wider ones. Is there really any major difference between the two riding surfaces?

I have both sets in 54mm and I really prefer the conical fulls. I'm usually riding an 8.5 with indy 149s and the 54 conical fulls feel perfectly in proportion with the rest of the setup - super smooth ride, the wider contact feels great on walls and tranny. I think once you get into the 54mm and above territory, the regular conicals feel a little too tall and narrow and awkward for flip tricks.

tangar

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1311 on: May 04, 2016, 11:26:03 PM »
This is too much science for me to comprehend.
Man the long board truck thing killed indy for me. I was willing to set aside the racism, but long boarding, gtfo... - DH

Esquivel

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1312 on: May 05, 2016, 06:07:21 AM »
This is too much science for me to comprehend.


unless you longboard, spacers are shit
Chusticiero/Fuma chustas - Person who smokes the end of the joint.

unerds

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1313 on: May 05, 2016, 09:30:54 AM »
This is too much science for me to comprehend.


unless you longboard, spacers are shit

yeahhh, this is mostly longboarder-ish gearhead shit, but i stand by the 'reduced rattling' property.

that's all i'm after with them, really.

there is no way for any of us to quantify whether or not other claimed benefits are true - shear forces and whatnot...

but i can tell you, explicitly that my shit doesn't rattle when i have spacers in, and my nuts are tight.

Hannity

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1314 on: May 05, 2016, 09:34:10 AM »
had to scoop more 58mm conical fulls after my last set-up got jacked at a local school (stupid me for forgetting it. anybody else have weekend sessions with the homies hauling a bunch of shit around from spot to spot and lose stuff along the way?) best fucking wheels ever. nothing holds u back.


Gotta agree here. I picked up the 58's for a bowl setup but they're just an awesome wheel in general - wide and fast. They haul ass over any pavement. Do you use risers with yours out of curiosity?
yep the 1/8" ones

Esquivel

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1315 on: May 06, 2016, 05:16:51 AM »
This is too much science for me to comprehend.


unless you longboard, spacers are shit

yeahhh, this is mostly longboarder-ish gearhead shit, but i stand by the 'reduced rattling' property.

that's all i'm after with them, really.

there is no way for any of us to quantify whether or not other claimed benefits are true - shear forces and whatnot...

but i can tell you, explicitly that my shit doesn't rattle when i have spacers in, and my nuts are tight.


this is exactly the thing that helps "fix" slipping axles (but then the board feels/sounds the way YOU want it to) . the higher quality bearings you use, the less the rattling. but is this a good thing? if the skateboard doesnt make any metallic/rattling noise then the pure urethane rolling sound makes it sound like a toy board, like the ones with the soft wheels. dunno, to each his own i suppose
Chusticiero/Fuma chustas - Person who smokes the end of the joint.

Xen

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1316 on: May 11, 2016, 09:09:20 AM »
Still waiting on that blunt slide....

N.L.

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1317 on: May 11, 2016, 12:22:56 PM »
 :o

funny you should mention that. going to set up the 101 radial slims tonight, as i just cracked my salman agah and my 99s are pretty wrecked. time for new board/ wheel combo.

hopefully, this weekend i'll film a shitty little bluntslide for you...

Shartarse

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1318 on: May 11, 2016, 05:21:29 PM »
Do formula 4's grip and slip like stfs, or do they have a more constant grip like regular urethane?

I love being able to powerslide at 90 degress for several feet without getting flatspots  (like you can with stfs), but I also like being able to ease into a lower angle powerslide and ~drift on the edge of griping/sliding, which I find easier on regular urethane... Which category do f4s fall into?

Cheers

zephyrpatio

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Re: Spitfire formula four
« Reply #1319 on: May 11, 2016, 08:38:47 PM »
I found this by accident today while searching for some classic full 51mms. I've never seen it anywhere before. Didn't know all the different shapes that existed.