Author Topic: Whats the deal with kickflips.  (Read 5538 times)

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hornyrick

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Re: Whats the deal with kickflips.
« Reply #30 on: July 10, 2013, 03:44:44 PM »
Does anyone have any tips for feebs on flat bars? im sick and tired of trying em for like 2 hours straight and doing nothing but missing it and doing a boardslide, get stuck and fly out or get stuck and eat shit. Ive wasted like 5 years of skating by making up excuses to myself to not try shit and now im 19 and i refuse to not be the best i can. i know it sounds kooky but its more of a personal goal.
make sure you keep all your weight on your back heel! It took me a while to learn them also but once I finally got them they soon became my favorite trick

ThugWaffle

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Re: Whats the deal with kickflips.
« Reply #31 on: July 10, 2013, 08:54:03 PM »
Does anyone have any tips for feebs on flat bars? im sick and tired of trying em for like 2 hours straight and doing nothing but missing it and doing a boardslide, get stuck and fly out or get stuck and eat shit. Ive wasted like 5 years of skating by making up excuses to myself to not try shit and now im 19 and i refuse to not be the best i can. i know it sounds kooky but its more of a personal goal.
That trick for me is just like how kickflips are for you... Some days I have them perfect every time, and some times I can't do them at all. they're definitely easier on round bars so I suggest trying them on that if there is one near you. Try not to ollie too high over the bar, but rather just high enough to ease onto it. You're going to want to lock in on the very edge of your truck, right side if you're goofy, left if you're regular, and keep your inner front wheel as close to the bar as possible, if you are dipped you're going to end up in a board slide. Keep your weight back throughout the grind and then lift up before the end. Easier said than done I guess, I hope this helps you at least a little bit...
God damn I feel like Will Easley typing out essays and shit haha

Yeah i can definitely try them on a round rail. Ill keep what you said in mind thanks.

shredbuffalo

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Re: Whats the deal with kickflips.
« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2013, 05:24:52 PM »
This is the only trick that I feel I'm really good and can make look great. It's probably my best quality as a person. If I happen to have an off day with them I feel like my life is falling apart.

My back foot is centred at the end of the tail and it's pretty much perpendicular to the board, but sometimes angled every-so-slightly forward. My front foot is at about a 30-degree angle forward and it's actually a few inches behind the bolts. I see a lot of people with their front foot much higher up on the board, but I find I get less height that way. If I'm just doing one on flat, my shoulders are pretty square, but if I'm going down or over something, my shoulders more closely approximate the angle of my front foot. I don't concentrate too hard on popping really hard and forcing it; the more relaxed I am the better they feel.

This is exactly how I feel. Kickflips are like my go to trick; probably the only one I really have on lock every time and I'm really good at. I do them on flat, over stuff, down stairs/gaps, off of banks/hips, even on tranny. I had a terrible time learning heelflips though and I'm still not great at them.

One thing that I've learned is that the further that my front foot is on the board the higher/cleaner/better my kickflips are. When I say "the further my front foot is on the board", I'm talking toe to heel ratio. I basically keep it right under my front bolts and have most of it on the board, I'd say 3/4 of it with only a bit of my heel hanging off. A lot of people think that if they have most of their foot hanging off of the board and just use their toe to flip the board it'll work better but that's not the case. You just need to pop and flick at the right point and it'll come right up to your back foot after flipping.

Tracer

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Re: Whats the deal with kickflips.
« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2013, 08:41:13 PM »
Nollie flips are the best feeling trick on earth

brownjenkin

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Re: Whats the deal with kickflips.
« Reply #34 on: July 18, 2013, 08:05:51 PM »
This is the only trick that I feel I'm really good and can make look great. It's probably my best quality as a person. If I happen to have an off day with them I feel like my life is falling apart.

My back foot is centred at the end of the tail and it's pretty much perpendicular to the board, but sometimes angled every-so-slightly forward. My front foot is at about a 30-degree angle forward and it's actually a few inches behind the bolts. I see a lot of people with their front foot much higher up on the board, but I find I get less height that way. If I'm just doing one on flat, my shoulders are pretty square, but if I'm going down or over something, my shoulders more closely approximate the angle of my front foot. I don't concentrate too hard on popping really hard and forcing it; the more relaxed I am the better they feel.

This is exactly how I feel. Kickflips are like my go to trick; probably the only one I really have on lock every time and I'm really good at. I do them on flat, over stuff, down stairs/gaps, off of banks/hips, even on tranny. I had a terrible time learning heelflips though and I'm still not great at them.

One thing that I've learned is that the further that my front foot is on the board the higher/cleaner/better my kickflips are. When I say "the further my front foot is on the board", I'm talking toe to heel ratio. I basically keep it right under my front bolts and have most of it on the board, I'd say 3/4 of it with only a bit of my heel hanging off. A lot of people think that if they have most of their foot hanging off of the board and just use their toe to flip the board it'll work better but that's not the case. You just need to pop and flick at the right point and it'll come right up to your back foot after flipping.

This is so on point. When I was first learning kickflips I'd have very little of my front foot on the board. Now I pretty much have as much foot on the board that I do when I ollie. It allows for a much more stable pop and that front foot can drag up nicely before the flick.

Will Easley

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Re: Whats the deal with kickflips.
« Reply #35 on: July 18, 2013, 09:06:43 PM »
This is the only trick that I feel I'm really good and can make look great. It's probably my best quality as a person. If I happen to have an off day with them I feel like my life is falling apart.

My back foot is centred at the end of the tail and it's pretty much perpendicular to the board, but sometimes angled every-so-slightly forward. My front foot is at about a 30-degree angle forward and it's actually a few inches behind the bolts. I see a lot of people with their front foot much higher up on the board, but I find I get less height that way. If I'm just doing one on flat, my shoulders are pretty square, but if I'm going down or over something, my shoulders more closely approximate the angle of my front foot. I don't concentrate too hard on popping really hard and forcing it; the more relaxed I am the better they feel.

This is exactly how I feel. Kickflips are like my go to trick; probably the only one I really have on lock every time and I'm really good at. I do them on flat, over stuff, down stairs/gaps, off of banks/hips, even on tranny. I had a terrible time learning heelflips though and I'm still not great at them.

One thing that I've learned is that the further that my front foot is on the board the higher/cleaner/better my kickflips are. When I say "the further my front foot is on the board", I'm talking toe to heel ratio. I basically keep it right under my front bolts and have most of it on the board, I'd say 3/4 of it with only a bit of my heel hanging off. A lot of people think that if they have most of their foot hanging off of the board and just use their toe to flip the board it'll work better but that's not the case. You just need to pop and flick at the right point and it'll come right up to your back foot after flipping.

This is so on point. When I was first learning kickflips I'd have very little of my front foot on the board. Now I pretty much have as much foot on the board that I do when I ollie. It allows for a much more stable pop and that front foot can drag up nicely before the flick.


yeah this is pretty spot on. Personally I like to keep a lot of foot on there but just put it at an angle, but theres been plenty of times where I've done certain lines that require quick feet & I've kickflipped perfectly out a straight up ollie position.

G-Sides

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Re: Whats the deal with kickflips.
« Reply #36 on: July 24, 2013, 04:46:47 AM »
same here, my kickflip and Ollie position is basically the same. one of my most consistent trick too