Author Topic: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview  (Read 3119 times)

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_UniversalTruth_

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Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« on: May 02, 2014, 02:45:11 PM »
Haven't read it (yet) but I like the video and pics  :)
https://quartersnacks.com/2014/05/an-interview-with-eli-reed/
i likes skooterboarding.. be lets friends :)

silkyjohnson

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2014, 02:58:35 PM »
Really stoked to see what he has in store for his welcome to Organika part, hopefully josh Matthews puts one out too.

Aatila

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2014, 05:01:07 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers

paraquat

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2014, 07:47:35 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

The Ghost of Lenny Kirk

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2014, 09:43:40 AM »
i think you guys are still under the impression that the skateboard industry is immune to manufacturing trends. its not.

midevilco

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2014, 10:37:50 AM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

Ahhh 2001. No facebook or instagram, no Nike, no abundance of 5 panel/janoski wearing clones, plenty of real skate shops, enough board sponsors to go around. Those were the days.

Aidan Clarke

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2014, 12:36:07 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

Ahhh 2001. No facebook or instagram, no Nike, no abundance of 5 panel/janoski wearing clones, plenty of real skate shops, enough board sponsors to go around. Those were the days.

I'll break it down aatila. Basically the skateboard market is over saturated with pros for the amount of people buying boards. Sure, skateboarding was not as big in 2000 and skating wasn't as main stream as it is now, but back then there were fewer pros people knew of to choose from and there were a lot more people likely to buy product with said pros' name on it. Like someone else said, although todays market is bigger its still finite. The internet fucked things up too, since now you can go online and watch some unknown guy from a random grassroots board company and buy their product by clicking a link on the video. 15 years ago, the only skaters you knew of were the guys with big parts on vhs. The majority chose from a few board companies (girl/choco, aws/habitat, warehouse, etc), so the guys on those teams got a higher % of sales from that market. Today, the % is so spread out because there are has been an exponential amount of companies popping up and the $ spent isn't just going to a hand full of companies. This reason outweighs everything else, even more than higher production costs for decks.

To midevilco, skateboarding has always been an industry that had clones and followers. Remember when everyone was wearing accels after pjlwhl? Or when everyone wore carpenter jeans/ cargo pants and puffy moon boot cupsole shoes in the late 90's? Or cut offs and purple/ Orange shirts in the early 90's with impractical small wheels? Skateboarders are the biggest trend hoppers ever, we just fool ourselves into thinking we aren't because we get to the trends before shitty rappers & celebrities, and then dump the old trend for the new trend quicker. We suck just as much as any other group of sheep.
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annoyedwithskating

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2014, 01:04:40 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

Ahhh 2001. No facebook or instagram, no Nike, no abundance of 5 panel/janoski wearing clones, plenty of real skate shops, enough board sponsors to go around. Those were the days.

I'll break it down aatila. Basically the skateboard market is over saturated with pros for the amount of people buying boards. Sure, skateboarding was not as big in 2000 and skating wasn't as main stream as it is now, but back then there were fewer pros people knew of to choose from and there were a lot more people likely to buy product with said pros' name on it. Like someone else said, although todays market is bigger its still finite. The internet fucked things up too, since now you can go online and watch some unknown guy from a random grassroots board company and buy their product by clicking a link on the video. 15 years ago, the only skaters you knew of were the guys with big parts on vhs. The majority chose from a few board companies (girl/choco, aws/habitat, warehouse, etc), so the guys on those teams got a higher % of sales from that market. Today, the % is so spread out because there are has been an exponential amount of companies popping up and the $ spent isn't just going to a hand full of companies. This reason outweighs everything else, even more than higher production costs for decks.

To midevilco, skateboarding has always been an industry that had clones and followers. Remember when everyone was wearing accels after pjlwhl? Or when everyone wore carpenter jeans/ cargo pants and puffy moon boot cupsole shoes in the late 90's? Or cut offs and purple/ Orange shirts in the early 90's with impractical small wheels? Skateboarders are the biggest trend hoppers ever, we just fool ourselves into thinking we aren't because we get to the trends before shitty rappers & celebrities, and then dump the old trend for the new trend quicker. We suck just as much as any other group of sheep.


wow, you must have taken a business class.

Dummbert

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2014, 01:19:36 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

Ahhh 2001. No facebook or instagram, no Nike, no abundance of 5 panel/janoski wearing clones, plenty of real skate shops, enough board sponsors to go around. Those were the days.

I'll break it down aatila. Basically the skateboard market is over saturated with pros for the amount of people buying boards. Sure, skateboarding was not as big in 2000 and skating wasn't as main stream as it is now, but back then there were fewer pros people knew of to choose from and there were a lot more people likely to buy product with said pros' name on it. Like someone else said, although todays market is bigger its still finite. The internet fucked things up too, since now you can go online and watch some unknown guy from a random grassroots board company and buy their product by clicking a link on the video. 15 years ago, the only skaters you knew of were the guys with big parts on vhs. The majority chose from a few board companies (girl/choco, aws/habitat, warehouse, etc), so the guys on those teams got a higher % of sales from that market. Today, the % is so spread out because there are has been an exponential amount of companies popping up and the $ spent isn't just going to a hand full of companies. This reason outweighs everything else, even more than higher production costs for decks.

To midevilco, skateboarding has always been an industry that had clones and followers. Remember when everyone was wearing accels after pjlwhl? Or when everyone wore carpenter jeans/ cargo pants and puffy moon boot cupsole shoes in the late 90's? Or cut offs and purple/ Orange shirts in the early 90's with impractical small wheels? Skateboarders are the biggest trend hoppers ever, we just fool ourselves into thinking we aren't because we get to the trends before shitty rappers & celebrities, and then dump the old trend for the new trend quicker. We suck just as much as any other group of sheep.

this. first everyone's making fun of said up and coming trend, like lately the comeback of the goofy boy look. and then shortly after something big, let's say 'cherry' at last, everyone adapts.
when it's not up to people like lucas, europe's always a bit late on trends, so you can already guess which transition comes next. it was funny though, two weeks after 'cherry' aired a stumbled across two clones of sage elsesser/sean pablo/aiden mackey. they wore the whole kit, the same haircuts and did the same tricks, it was atrocious.

rideforJJ

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2014, 07:15:11 PM »
If his sobriety makes it so he can continue to one up Gino and others out there I might stop buying local company decks and buy an Organika board for 3 times the price.

Aidan Clarke

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2014, 12:43:28 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

Ahhh 2001. No facebook or instagram, no Nike, no abundance of 5 panel/janoski wearing clones, plenty of real skate shops, enough board sponsors to go around. Those were the days.

I'll break it down aatila. Basically the skateboard market is over saturated with pros for the amount of people buying boards. Sure, skateboarding was not as big in 2000 and skating wasn't as main stream as it is now, but back then there were fewer pros people knew of to choose from and there were a lot more people likely to buy product with said pros' name on it. Like someone else said, although todays market is bigger its still finite. The internet fucked things up too, since now you can go online and watch some unknown guy from a random grassroots board company and buy their product by clicking a link on the video. 15 years ago, the only skaters you knew of were the guys with big parts on vhs. The majority chose from a few board companies (girl/choco, aws/habitat, warehouse, etc), so the guys on those teams got a higher % of sales from that market. Today, the % is so spread out because there are has been an exponential amount of companies popping up and the $ spent isn't just going to a hand full of companies. This reason outweighs everything else, even more than higher production costs for decks.

To midevilco, skateboarding has always been an industry that had clones and followers. Remember when everyone was wearing accels after pjlwhl? Or when everyone wore carpenter jeans/ cargo pants and puffy moon boot cupsole shoes in the late 90's? Or cut offs and purple/ Orange shirts in the early 90's with impractical small wheels? Skateboarders are the biggest trend hoppers ever, we just fool ourselves into thinking we aren't because we get to the trends before shitty rappers & celebrities, and then dump the old trend for the new trend quicker. We suck just as much as any other group of sheep.


wow, you must have taken a business class.



I was supposed to, but I dropped out of college so I never did. It needed an explanation since it was brought up as a topic of discussion. Don't be a dick bag, geoff.
#crackkka

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annoyedwithskating

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2014, 12:49:52 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

Ahhh 2001. No facebook or instagram, no Nike, no abundance of 5 panel/janoski wearing clones, plenty of real skate shops, enough board sponsors to go around. Those were the days.

I'll break it down aatila. Basically the skateboard market is over saturated with pros for the amount of people buying boards. Sure, skateboarding was not as big in 2000 and skating wasn't as main stream as it is now, but back then there were fewer pros people knew of to choose from and there were a lot more people likely to buy product with said pros' name on it. Like someone else said, although todays market is bigger its still finite. The internet fucked things up too, since now you can go online and watch some unknown guy from a random grassroots board company and buy their product by clicking a link on the video. 15 years ago, the only skaters you knew of were the guys with big parts on vhs. The majority chose from a few board companies (girl/choco, aws/habitat, warehouse, etc), so the guys on those teams got a higher % of sales from that market. Today, the % is so spread out because there are has been an exponential amount of companies popping up and the $ spent isn't just going to a hand full of companies. This reason outweighs everything else, even more than higher production costs for decks.

To midevilco, skateboarding has always been an industry that had clones and followers. Remember when everyone was wearing accels after pjlwhl? Or when everyone wore carpenter jeans/ cargo pants and puffy moon boot cupsole shoes in the late 90's? Or cut offs and purple/ Orange shirts in the early 90's with impractical small wheels? Skateboarders are the biggest trend hoppers ever, we just fool ourselves into thinking we aren't because we get to the trends before shitty rappers & celebrities, and then dump the old trend for the new trend quicker. We suck just as much as any other group of sheep.


wow, you must have taken a business class.



I was supposed to, but I dropped out of college so I never did. It needed an explanation since it was brought up as a topic of discussion. Don't be a dick bag, geoff.

youre right, sorry. so yeah, pretty good explanations. I think the main thing is that there simply is not enough money to go around. kids buy into gimmicks (like you alluded to) therefore most of the money goes to whoever has the most pizzaz.

Aidan Clarke

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2014, 01:55:37 PM »
I dug the interview but I have to ask, with every interview coming out and pros saying board companies aren't making much money and paying riders yet skateboarding is bigger than ever who's pocketing all the money kids are obviously buying boards. I want to see bareback or generator board sells numbers
Is skating really bigger than ever? I think it is just at a really consistent place. Remember in 2001 people on habitat and workshop where banking like 10 large a month on board royalties alone. It was a far more prosperous time to be pro. I think the new mantra is that operational costs are higher and companies are trying to stock pile a bit more cash to insulate themselves from any bad weather that might arise.

Ahhh 2001. No facebook or instagram, no Nike, no abundance of 5 panel/janoski wearing clones, plenty of real skate shops, enough board sponsors to go around. Those were the days.

I'll break it down aatila. Basically the skateboard market is over saturated with pros for the amount of people buying boards. Sure, skateboarding was not as big in 2000 and skating wasn't as main stream as it is now, but back then there were fewer pros people knew of to choose from and there were a lot more people likely to buy product with said pros' name on it. Like someone else said, although todays market is bigger its still finite. The internet fucked things up too, since now you can go online and watch some unknown guy from a random grassroots board company and buy their product by clicking a link on the video. 15 years ago, the only skaters you knew of were the guys with big parts on vhs. The majority chose from a few board companies (girl/choco, aws/habitat, warehouse, etc), so the guys on those teams got a higher % of sales from that market. Today, the % is so spread out because there are has been an exponential amount of companies popping up and the $ spent isn't just going to a hand full of companies. This reason outweighs everything else, even more than higher production costs for decks.

To midevilco, skateboarding has always been an industry that had clones and followers. Remember when everyone was wearing accels after pjlwhl? Or when everyone wore carpenter jeans/ cargo pants and puffy moon boot cupsole shoes in the late 90's? Or cut offs and purple/ Orange shirts in the early 90's with impractical small wheels? Skateboarders are the biggest trend hoppers ever, we just fool ourselves into thinking we aren't because we get to the trends before shitty rappers & celebrities, and then dump the old trend for the new trend quicker. We suck just as much as any other group of sheep.


wow, you must have taken a business class.



I was supposed to, but I dropped out of college so I never did. It needed an explanation since it was brought up as a topic of discussion. Don't be a dick bag, geoff.

youre right, sorry. so yeah, pretty good explanations. I think the main thing is that there simply is not enough money to go around. kids buy into gimmicks (like you alluded to) therefore most of the money goes to whoever has the most pizzaz.

You're right, that's why pro skateboarders need sportswear shoe/ car company/ energy drink/ nascar type of sponsors. It's to make up for the difference between what their board sponsors used to pay versus what they're paying out now.

On the flip side, it's easier for smaller/ newer companies to gain momentum in today's market. A company like Hopps would have had a harder time getting off the ground 10+ years ago and may have ended up like Illuminati/ Subzero. All of this is natural though, usually every decade or so the bigger companies get hit and the smaller companies take their place. Sort of like what happened with Powell and World Industries in the 90's.
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oyolar

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Re: Quarterschnax Eli Reed Interview
« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2014, 10:12:00 PM »
If his sobriety makes it so he can continue to one up Gino and others out there I might stop buying local company decks and buy an Organika board for 3 times the price.

So Organika's are $150 where you are?  Or are local decks $16.67?