Author Topic: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread  (Read 670 times)

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creamsesh

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Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« on: June 03, 2020, 05:48:26 AM »
The PlayStation (officially abbreviated as PS and commonly known as the PS1 or its codename PSX) is a home video game console developed and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. It was first released on 3 December 1994 in Japan, on 9 September 1995 in North America, on 29 September 1995 in Europe, and on 15 November 1995 in Australia, and was the first of the PlayStation lineup of video game consoles. As a fifth generation console, the PlayStation primarily competed with the Nintendo 64 and the Sega Saturn.

Specifications :
Central processing unit (CPU)
LSI CoreWare CW33300-based core
MIPS R3000A-compatible 32-bit RISC CPU MIPS R3051 with 5 KB L1 cache, running at 33.8688 MHz.
The microprocessor was manufactured by LSI Logic Corp. with technology licensed from SGI.

Features: Initial feature size (process node) was 0.5 micron (500 nm).[3]
850k 1M transistors[citation needed]
Operating performance: 30 MIPS[4]
Bus bandwidth 132 MB/s[5]
One arithmetic/logic unit (ALU)
One shifter
CPU cache RAM:
4 KB instruction cache[2]
1 KB non-associative SRAM data cache

Geometry Transform Engine (GTE) Coprocessor that resides inside the main CPU processor, giving it additional vector math instructions used for 3D graphics, lighting, geometry, polygon and coordinate transformations GTE performs high-speed matrix multiplications.
Operating performance: 66 MIPS
Polygons per second (rendered in hardware):
90,000 with texture mapping, lighting and Gouraud shading
180,000 with texture mapping
360,000[7] with flat shading
Motion Decoder (MDEC)
Also residing within the main CPU, enables full screen, high quality FMV playback and is responsible for decompressing images and video into VRAM.
Operating performance: 80 MIPS
Documented device mode is to read three RLE-encoded 1616 macroblocks, run IDCT and assemble a single 1616 RGB macroblock.
Output data may be transferred directly to GPU via DMA.
It is possible to overwrite IDCT matrix and some additional parameters, however MDEC internal instruction set was never documented.
It is directly connected to a CPU bus.
System Control Coprocessor (Cop0)
This unit is part of the CPU. Has 16 32-bit control registers.
Modified from the original R3000A cop0 architecture, with the addition of a few registers and functions.
Controls memory management through virtual memory technique, system interrupts, exception handling, and breakpoints.
Memory
2 MB main EDO DRAM
Additional RAM is integrated with the GPU (including a 1 MB framebuffer) and SPU (512 KB), see below for details.
Cache RAM for CPU core and CD-ROM. See the relevant sections for details.
Flash RAM support through the use of memory cards, see below.
BIOS stored on 512 KB ROM
Graphics processing unit (GPU)
32-bit Sony GPU (designed by Toshiba)
Handles display of graphics, control of framebuffer, and drawing of polygons and textures
Handles 2D graphics processing, in a similar manner to the 3D engine
RAM:
1 MB VRAM (later models contained SGRAM) for framebuffer
2 KB texture cache (132 MB/s memory bus bandwidth, 32-bit wide)
64 bytes FIFO buffer
Features:
Adjustable framebuffer (1024512)
Emulation of simultaneous backgrounds (to simulate parallax scrolling)
Mask bit
Texture window
Dithering
Clipping
Alpha blending (4 per-texel alpha blending modes)
Fog
Framebuffer effects
Transparency effects
Render to texture
Offscreen rendering
Multipass rendering
Flat or Gouraud shading and texture mapping[2]
No line restriction
Colored light sourcing
Resolutions:
Progressive: 256224 to 640240 pixels[2]
Interlaced: 256448 to 640480 pixels
Colors:
Maximum color depth of 16,777,216 colors (24-bit true color)
57,344 (256224) to 153,600 (640240) colors on screen
Unlimited color lookup tables (CLUTs)
32 levels of transparency
All calculations are performed to 24 bit accuracy
Texture mapping color mode:
Mode 4: 4-bit CLUT (16 colors)
Mode 8: 8-bit CLUT (256 colors)
Mode 15: 15-bit direct (32,768 colors)
Mode 24: 24-bit (16,777,216 colors)
Sprite engine
1024512 framebuffer, 88 and 1616 sprite sizes, bitmap objects
Up to 4,000 sprites on screen (at 88 sprite size), scaling and rotation
256256 maximum sprite size
Special sprite effects:
Rotation
Scaling up/down
Warping
Transparency
Fading
Priority
Vertical and horizontal line scroll
Sound processing unit (SPU)
16-bit Sony SPU
Supports ADPCM sources with up to 24 channels
Sampling rate of up to 44.1 kHz
512 KB RAM
PCM audio source
Supports MIDI sequencing
Digital effects include:
Pitch modulation
Envelope
Looping
Digital reverb
I/O system and connectivity
CD-ROM drive
660 MB maximum storage capacity, double speed CD-ROM drive
2, with a maximum data throughput of 300 KB/s (double speed), 150 KB/s (normal)
128 KB data buffer
XA Mode 2 compliant
Audio CD play
CD-DA (CD-Digital Audio)
Rated for 70,000 seek operations
Two control pads via connectors
Expandable with multitap connector
Backup flash RAM support
Two removable cards
Each card has 128 KB flash memory
OS support for File Save, Retrieve and Remove
Video and audio connectivity
AV Multi Out (Composite video, S-Video, RGBS)
RCA Composite video and Stereo out (SCPH-100x to 5000 only)
RFU (SCPH-112X) DC out (SCPH-100x to 5000 only)
S-Video out (SCPH-1000 only)
Serial and parallel ports
Serial I/O (used for PlayStation Link Cable SCPH-100x to 900x only)
Parallel I/O (N/A) SCPH-100x to 750x only)
Power input
100 V AC (NTSC-J); 120 V AC (NTSC-U/C); or 220240 V AC (PAL)
7.5 V DC 2 A

FleeceFlannel

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2020, 05:57:42 AM »
The PlayStation (officially abbreviated as PS and commonly known as the PS1 or its codename PSX) is a home video game console developed and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. It was first released on 3 December 1994 in Japan, on 9 September 1995 in North America, on 29 September 1995 in Europe, and on 15 November 1995 in Australia, and was the first of the PlayStation lineup of video game consoles. As a fifth generation console, the PlayStation primarily competed with the Nintendo 64 and the Sega Saturn.

Specifications :
Central processing unit (CPU)
LSI CoreWare CW33300-based core
MIPS R3000A-compatible 32-bit RISC CPU MIPS R3051 with 5 KB L1 cache, running at 33.8688 MHz.
The microprocessor was manufactured by LSI Logic Corp. with technology licensed from SGI.

Features: Initial feature size (process node) was 0.5 micron (500 nm).[3]
850k 1M transistors[citation needed]
Operating performance: 30 MIPS[4]
Bus bandwidth 132 MB/s[5]
One arithmetic/logic unit (ALU)
One shifter
CPU cache RAM:
4 KB instruction cache[2]
1 KB non-associative SRAM data cache

Geometry Transform Engine (GTE) Coprocessor that resides inside the main CPU processor, giving it additional vector math instructions used for 3D graphics, lighting, geometry, polygon and coordinate transformations GTE performs high-speed matrix multiplications.
Operating performance: 66 MIPS
Polygons per second (rendered in hardware):
90,000 with texture mapping, lighting and Gouraud shading
180,000 with texture mapping
360,000[7] with flat shading
Motion Decoder (MDEC)
Also residing within the main CPU, enables full screen, high quality FMV playback and is responsible for decompressing images and video into VRAM.
Operating performance: 80 MIPS
Documented device mode is to read three RLE-encoded 1616 macroblocks, run IDCT and assemble a single 1616 RGB macroblock.
Output data may be transferred directly to GPU via DMA.
It is possible to overwrite IDCT matrix and some additional parameters, however MDEC internal instruction set was never documented.
It is directly connected to a CPU bus.
System Control Coprocessor (Cop0)
This unit is part of the CPU. Has 16 32-bit control registers.
Modified from the original R3000A cop0 architecture, with the addition of a few registers and functions.
Controls memory management through virtual memory technique, system interrupts, exception handling, and breakpoints.
Memory
2 MB main EDO DRAM
Additional RAM is integrated with the GPU (including a 1 MB framebuffer) and SPU (512 KB), see below for details.
Cache RAM for CPU core and CD-ROM. See the relevant sections for details.
Flash RAM support through the use of memory cards, see below.
BIOS stored on 512 KB ROM
Graphics processing unit (GPU)
32-bit Sony GPU (designed by Toshiba)
Handles display of graphics, control of framebuffer, and drawing of polygons and textures
Handles 2D graphics processing, in a similar manner to the 3D engine
RAM:
1 MB VRAM (later models contained SGRAM) for framebuffer
2 KB texture cache (132 MB/s memory bus bandwidth, 32-bit wide)
64 bytes FIFO buffer
Features:
Adjustable framebuffer (1024512)
Emulation of simultaneous backgrounds (to simulate parallax scrolling)
Mask bit
Texture window
Dithering
Clipping
Alpha blending (4 per-texel alpha blending modes)
Fog
Framebuffer effects
Transparency effects
Render to texture
Offscreen rendering
Multipass rendering
Flat or Gouraud shading and texture mapping[2]
No line restriction
Colored light sourcing
Resolutions:
Progressive: 256224 to 640240 pixels[2]
Interlaced: 256448 to 640480 pixels
Colors:
Maximum color depth of 16,777,216 colors (24-bit true color)
57,344 (256224) to 153,600 (640240) colors on screen
Unlimited color lookup tables (CLUTs)
32 levels of transparency
All calculations are performed to 24 bit accuracy
Texture mapping color mode:
Mode 4: 4-bit CLUT (16 colors)
Mode 8: 8-bit CLUT (256 colors)
Mode 15: 15-bit direct (32,768 colors)
Mode 24: 24-bit (16,777,216 colors)
Sprite engine
1024512 framebuffer, 88 and 1616 sprite sizes, bitmap objects
Up to 4,000 sprites on screen (at 88 sprite size), scaling and rotation
256256 maximum sprite size
Special sprite effects:
Rotation
Scaling up/down
Warping
Transparency
Fading
Priority
Vertical and horizontal line scroll
Sound processing unit (SPU)
16-bit Sony SPU
Supports ADPCM sources with up to 24 channels
Sampling rate of up to 44.1 kHz
512 KB RAM
PCM audio source
Supports MIDI sequencing
Digital effects include:
Pitch modulation
Envelope
Looping
Digital reverb
I/O system and connectivity
CD-ROM drive
660 MB maximum storage capacity, double speed CD-ROM drive
2, with a maximum data throughput of 300 KB/s (double speed), 150 KB/s (normal)
128 KB data buffer
XA Mode 2 compliant
Audio CD play
CD-DA (CD-Digital Audio)
Rated for 70,000 seek operations
Two control pads via connectors
Expandable with multitap connector
Backup flash RAM support
Two removable cards
Each card has 128 KB flash memory
OS support for File Save, Retrieve and Remove
Video and audio connectivity
AV Multi Out (Composite video, S-Video, RGBS)
RCA Composite video and Stereo out (SCPH-100x to 5000 only)
RFU (SCPH-112X) DC out (SCPH-100x to 5000 only)
S-Video out (SCPH-1000 only)
Serial and parallel ports
Serial I/O (used for PlayStation Link Cable SCPH-100x to 900x only)
Parallel I/O (N/A) SCPH-100x to 750x only)
Power input
100 V AC (NTSC-J); 120 V AC (NTSC-U/C); or 220240 V AC (PAL)
7.5 V DC 2 A

Wow, thanks Tony.

Concerned_Skater

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Ziad

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2020, 09:43:17 PM »
the videos from the game got me into skating. Thanks Tony

Hyliannightmare

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2020, 02:23:31 AM »
Left up square
Left right triangle
Right down grab

Bobby Lashley

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2020, 10:45:54 AM »
Wish he was my dad. Id be the biggest pile

fake nollie.sk8er

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2020, 02:39:16 PM »
The 900 is inspirational.

Glurmpz

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2020, 01:03:48 AM »
This is not what I thought it was. I remember playing the demo version of Tony 2 at my friend Dave's every day after work until the full game came out.

ogcoors

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2020, 02:37:45 PM »
Have you seen the Tiny Hawk videos????? Wow!

Tony is cool. Not a devo fan though personally.

sammyz

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2020, 01:51:55 AM »
i grew up in the mid/late 80's watching skating and skating...idolised people like Tony Hawk...even though i kept skating through the 90's and early 2000's I never played the game - just wasn't into gaming.

To this day it trips me out when I hear younger people say they got into skating because of the game, or they know Tony from the game.

It's cool as fuck that the game had this much impact

finecojeffe

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2020, 05:07:12 AM »
First time I ever saw THPS1 played properly was in a small skateshop in conshohocken PA called Synergy. I'd played the game before but barely, and didn't know about how to get the right combos because it didn't have manuals or any way I could see to link more than a flip in to a grind/slide/ flip out. Jimmy Gorecki was scoring tons of points on that schoolyard level since he knew to hit that flip from the roof to the ledge, to the long stair rail, to the little coping on that small bump ramp to I think the coping in the half pipe to the pools. After that I bought the game to learn how to play it, thus wasting tons of time and money in future THPS purchases. Fun games.

Allez_Jambon

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Re: Tony Hawk Appreciation thread
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2020, 08:53:57 AM »
tonyhawkstar