Author Topic: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)  (Read 4424 times)

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snickers

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #90 on: January 22, 2021, 06:12:15 PM »
amsterdam, lisbon, berlin, + copenhagen are all decent shouts tho ams (and obviously cph) is expensive getting expensive. don't bother with london (where i'm based) unless you have reason to be here: it sucks right now and it's only getting worse due to brexit.
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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #91 on: January 23, 2021, 07:58:45 AM »
Expand Quote
Any EuroPals wanna chime in on how beneficial it is for an expat to have a higher degree (Masters level) when trying to get jobs/residence visas? Does a degree/experience go a long way or is money the biggest component to success in trying to get established?

I mean, here in California, shit back in Boston too, I know numerous dudes who overstayed their visa, married a US citizen, and they're all set to stay. Fuck, I know a Canadian-Bulgarian with no income, who got married, divorced, went rogue, got married again and now has a green card.
[close]

I think if you marry someone, it's pretty much the same everywhere, you're set to stay. As for the degree/experience factor, I think it does go a long way, much more than just "money". actually I've never heard of money being a criteria?
The other big thing IMO is mastering the local language. You're probably not going to find a good job if you don't speak german in Germany, Spanish in Spain and so on....
I've definitely heard of people going to travel agencies that help sort out working visas and heard that the company requires proof of a certain amount of money on bank statement before the person is cleared to get a visa and go abroad.
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IusedToSkateMore

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #92 on: January 23, 2021, 03:19:41 PM »
Expand Quote
Any EuroPals wanna chime in on how beneficial it is for an expat to have a higher degree (Masters level) when trying to get jobs/residence visas? Does a degree/experience go a long way or is money the biggest component to success in trying to get established?

I mean, here in California, shit back in Boston too, I know numerous dudes who overstayed their visa, married a US citizen, and they're all set to stay. Fuck, I know a Canadian-Bulgarian with no income, who got married, divorced, went rogue, got married again and now has a green card.
[close]


what do you mean by that exactly?

In spain, for instance, 500k Euro investment or real estate purchase makes one and their family eligible for visa/residency. Portugal, 350k Euro investment, eligible for citizenship in 5 years. Ireland 1million.

Not that I can even dream of affording that sort of thing, but I know a woman from Colombia who has numerous visas due to her family owning a multinational shipping corporation and dropping bank all over the globe. I think she's got US, British, Colombia, and maybe one more.

Expand Quote
Any EuroPals wanna chime in on how beneficial it is for an expat to have a higher degree (Masters level) when trying to get jobs/residence visas? Does a degree/experience go a long way or is money the biggest component to success in trying to get established?

I mean, here in California, shit back in Boston too, I know numerous dudes who overstayed their visa, married a US citizen, and they're all set to stay. Fuck, I know a Canadian-Bulgarian with no income, who got married, divorced, went rogue, got married again and now has a green card.
[close]

I think if you marry someone, it's pretty much the same everywhere, you're set to stay. As for the degree/experience factor, I think it does go a long way, much more than just "money". actually I've never heard of money being a criteria?
The other big thing IMO is mastering the local language. You're probably not going to find a good job if you don't speak german in Germany, Spanish in Spain and so on....

thanks for your insight.
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OldieButFrenchie

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #93 on: January 25, 2021, 12:05:46 AM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Any EuroPals wanna chime in on how beneficial it is for an expat to have a higher degree (Masters level) when trying to get jobs/residence visas? Does a degree/experience go a long way or is money the biggest component to success in trying to get established?

I mean, here in California, shit back in Boston too, I know numerous dudes who overstayed their visa, married a US citizen, and they're all set to stay. Fuck, I know a Canadian-Bulgarian with no income, who got married, divorced, went rogue, got married again and now has a green card.
[close]


what do you mean by that exactly?
[close]

In spain, for instance, 500k Euro investment or real estate purchase makes one and their family eligible for visa/residency. Portugal, 350k Euro investment, eligible for citizenship in 5 years. Ireland 1million.

Not that I can even dream of affording that sort of thing, but I know a woman from Colombia who has numerous visas due to her family owning a multinational shipping corporation and dropping bank all over the globe. I think she's got US, British, Colombia, and maybe one more.

that's crazy, I had no idea....I thought you guys meant proving you have X amount of money in your accounts, not actually investing in the local economy. Now I get it, I guess it makes sense from an economic point of view. You can't turn away investors.
Also to the guy who said there are english-speaking jobs: yes there are, but from what I've seen it's pretty much limited to teaching english, bartending in Irish pubs, things like that. I really doubt you can get any job with responsabilities whithout speaking the local language.

Mark Renton

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #94 on: January 25, 2021, 02:26:52 AM »
^ yeah, plus I never got the ‘appeal’ of not speaking the local language.
I felt so off while I was living in Spain till I learned it.

Kianou_rivz

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #95 on: January 25, 2021, 02:31:05 AM »
I'm French and moved from Paris to Barcelona 3 years ago.

If you haven't decided yet, here are my 2 cents:

Paris:
* very expensive, if you don't plan on working that much, you'll end up stuck pretty much all the time because of the cost of living.
* rents are very high for small flats
* it does rain a lot, so skating from October to April can be a real struggle
* healthcare system is good, especially if you have Euro citizenship
* skate, music and art scenes are the best I've experienced in my life
* social life is great, easy to meet people and make friends through skating. Head to smaller spots like Jemmapes, Rue Léon Cladel or Palais de Tokyo if you want to meet people
* with the current situation, it will be hard to find a job and get started
* the city is full of stress, negativity and people thinking they're unique and better than everyone else
* there's literally nothing to do outside of the city, except maybe biking around. If you want to stay close to the country side, definitely not a good option.

Barcelona:
* cost of life is way better, rents are cheaper and getting down now that the tourists have fled the city.
* skate scene is a little bit harder to get into if you don't want to spend time in Parallel or Macba. FTC is a good place to start if you want to meet people, and lots of cool DIYs around and in the city
* the arts & music scene is pretty poor in my own experience. Hope you like house/electro because that's pretty much a lot of what you'll find
* weather is amazing, Catalan people can be pretty tough at first but they'll chill once they understand you're not here to get wasted and piss all over the city.
* healthcare system is really good, people speak english and are genuinely nice and caring for each others
* you can get to the mountains in 45 min, or 1h30 in the winter for skiing/snowboarding, then back to the beach in the evening for a couple drinks

I saw someone recommending northern Spain (Basque Country). I grew up in the region, Bilbao is really sick, surf scene is pretty strong too and you can get to the mountains in the winter. Food is amazing. It does rain a lot though, so you'll probably get some good weather from May to September, but the rest of the year you'll mostly be indoors.

Hope that helps, good luck with the move.

sexualhelon

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #96 on: January 25, 2021, 02:40:25 AM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Any EuroPals wanna chime in on how beneficial it is for an expat to have a higher degree (Masters level) when trying to get jobs/residence visas? Does a degree/experience go a long way or is money the biggest component to success in trying to get established?

I mean, here in California, shit back in Boston too, I know numerous dudes who overstayed their visa, married a US citizen, and they're all set to stay. Fuck, I know a Canadian-Bulgarian with no income, who got married, divorced, went rogue, got married again and now has a green card.
[close]


what do you mean by that exactly?
[close]

In spain, for instance, 500k Euro investment or real estate purchase makes one and their family eligible for visa/residency. Portugal, 350k Euro investment, eligible for citizenship in 5 years. Ireland 1million.

Not that I can even dream of affording that sort of thing, but I know a woman from Colombia who has numerous visas due to her family owning a multinational shipping corporation and dropping bank all over the globe. I think she's got US, British, Colombia, and maybe one more.
[close]

that's crazy, I had no idea....I thought you guys meant proving you have X amount of money in your accounts, not actually investing in the local economy. Now I get it, I guess it makes sense from an economic point of view. You can't turn away investors.
Also to the guy who said there are english-speaking jobs: yes there are, but from what I've seen it's pretty much limited to teaching english, bartending in Irish pubs, things like that. I really doubt you can get any job with responsabilities whithout speaking the local language.

Having money in your bank account doesn't really do anything for you visa/citizenship/residency wise because that money isn't really doing anything for X country. If you invest in property, a business, etc... then it kind of makes sense that they'd give you residency because you'll probably need to be there for an extended period of time.

But there is a catch for most countries that give you residency just for purchasing property - you're still not allowed to work there. Those schemes tend to be aged at retirees. They don't want you taking jobs from the country's citizens, they just want you putting money into their economy.

For marriage, your spouse will still have to meet certain requirements to get your resident permit approved but it's generally a shoe in - let's assume we're talking about a legitimate marriage here.

If you speak English and don't learn the local language, you generally restrict yourselves to the jobs mentioned above. You'll also ostracize yourself from the locals to a very large extent, depending. But it does also depend on the industry as well. If you work in tech then it will most likely be easier for you to get by on just English, for instance. Still, once you're living in X country, learning the local language will get you out of a bubble and open up more opportunities if you intend to stay there long term.

Giza Butler

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #97 on: January 25, 2021, 04:15:24 AM »
I'm French and moved from Paris to Barcelona 3 years ago.


Barcelona:
* cost of life is way better, rents are cheaper and getting down now that the tourists have fled the city.
* skate scene is a little bit harder to get into if you don't want to spend time in Parallel or Macba. FTC is a good place to start if you want to meet people, and lots of cool DIYs around and in the city
* the arts & music scene is pretty poor in my own experience. Hope you like house/electro because that's pretty much a lot of what you'll find
* weather is amazing, Catalan people can be pretty tough at first but they'll chill once they understand you're not here to get wasted and piss all over the city.
* healthcare system is really good, people speak english and are genuinely nice and caring for each others
* you can get to the mountains in 45 min, or 1h30 in the winter for skiing/snowboarding, then back to the beach in the evening for a couple drinks


Been livin in Barcelona for the past 4 years now, this description has to be the most accurate ever read.

If you wanna go skate around, give me a shout!
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OldieButFrenchie

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #98 on: January 25, 2021, 05:20:54 AM »
I'm French and moved from Paris to Barcelona 3 years ago.

If you haven't decided yet, here are my 2 cents:

Paris:
* very expensive, if you don't plan on working that much, you'll end up stuck pretty much all the time because of the cost of living.
* rents are very high for small flats
* it does rain a lot, so skating from October to April can be a real struggle
* healthcare system is good, especially if you have Euro citizenship
* skate, music and art scenes are the best I've experienced in my life
* social life is great, easy to meet people and make friends through skating. Head to smaller spots like Jemmapes, Rue Léon Cladel or Palais de Tokyo if you want to meet people
* with the current situation, it will be hard to find a job and get started
* the city is full of stress, negativity and people thinking they're unique and better than everyone else
* there's literally nothing to do outside of the city, except maybe biking around. If you want to stay close to the country side, definitely not a good option.

Barcelona:
* cost of life is way better, rents are cheaper and getting down now that the tourists have fled the city.
* skate scene is a little bit harder to get into if you don't want to spend time in Parallel or Macba. FTC is a good place to start if you want to meet people, and lots of cool DIYs around and in the city
* the arts & music scene is pretty poor in my own experience. Hope you like house/electro because that's pretty much a lot of what you'll find
* weather is amazing, Catalan people can be pretty tough at first but they'll chill once they understand you're not here to get wasted and piss all over the city.
* healthcare system is really good, people speak english and are genuinely nice and caring for each others
* you can get to the mountains in 45 min, or 1h30 in the winter for skiing/snowboarding, then back to the beach in the evening for a couple drinks

I saw someone recommending northern Spain (Basque Country). I grew up in the region, Bilbao is really sick, surf scene is pretty strong too and you can get to the mountains in the winter. Food is amazing. It does rain a lot though, so you'll probably get some good weather from May to September, but the rest of the year you'll mostly be indoors.

Hope that helps, good luck with the move.

Paris description pretty spot on too!
and yeah, it is a stressful city....no wonder when you consider it has 2 times the population density of NY, 3 times that of London.
But still...I kinda miss the "fuck you" attitude of Paris to be honest. People there don't take bullshit. actually I miss Paris period, but it could very well be that if I moved back, I'd be sick of it again in 6 months....

Easy Slider

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #99 on: January 25, 2021, 06:41:22 AM »
I love Paris but not sure I could live there. Here is a nice track about les Parigots.

https://youtu.be/NY5Xtc6YuCg

Mcidraque

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #100 on: January 25, 2021, 05:19:25 PM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Any EuroPals wanna chime in on how beneficial it is for an expat to have a higher degree (Masters level) when trying to get jobs/residence visas? Does a degree/experience go a long way or is money the biggest component to success in trying to get established?

I mean, here in California, shit back in Boston too, I know numerous dudes who overstayed their visa, married a US citizen, and they're all set to stay. Fuck, I know a Canadian-Bulgarian with no income, who got married, divorced, went rogue, got married again and now has a green card.
[close]


what do you mean by that exactly?
[close]

In spain, for instance, 500k Euro investment or real estate purchase makes one and their family eligible for visa/residency. Portugal, 350k Euro investment, eligible for citizenship in 5 years. Ireland 1million.

Not that I can even dream of affording that sort of thing, but I know a woman from Colombia who has numerous visas due to her family owning a multinational shipping corporation and dropping bank all over the globe. I think she's got US, British, Colombia, and maybe one more.
[close]

that's crazy, I had no idea....I thought you guys meant proving you have X amount of money in your accounts, not actually investing in the local economy. Now I get it, I guess it makes sense from an economic point of view. You can't turn away investors.
Also to the guy who said there are english-speaking jobs: yes there are, but from what I've seen it's pretty much limited to teaching english, bartending in Irish pubs, things like that. I really doubt you can get any job with responsabilities whithout speaking the local language.
[close]

Having money in your bank account doesn't really do anything for you visa/citizenship/residency wise because that money isn't really doing anything for X country. If you invest in property, a business, etc... then it kind of makes sense that they'd give you residency because you'll probably need to be there for an extended period of time.

But there is a catch for most countries that give you residency just for purchasing property - you're still not allowed to work there. Those schemes tend to be aged at retirees. They don't want you taking jobs from the country's citizens, they just want you putting money into their economy.

For marriage, your spouse will still have to meet certain requirements to get your resident permit approved but it's generally a shoe in - let's assume we're talking about a legitimate marriage here.

If you speak English and don't learn the local language, you generally restrict yourselves to the jobs mentioned above. You'll also ostracize yourself from the locals to a very large extent, depending. But it does also depend on the industry as well. If you work in tech then it will most likely be easier for you to get by on just English, for instance. Still, once you're living in X country, learning the local language will get you out of a bubble and open up more opportunities if you intend to stay there long term.

can't speak for the whole UE but at least here in Spain if you plan to have a residency here without a local contract BUT you do have a contract on any country that certifies you're solvent money wise there's a kinda of visa that pretty much let you settle here (no time limits/visa problems).

US friend of mine found that out while figuring out ways to make Spain his residency having a contract with an USA company and he's had cero problems ever since (good 3-4 years now)

Rasmus

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #101 on: January 26, 2021, 01:41:38 AM »
Expand Quote
Any EuroPals wanna chime in on how beneficial it is for an expat to have a higher degree (Masters level) when trying to get jobs/residence visas? Does a degree/experience go a long way or is money the biggest component to success in trying to get established?

I mean, here in California, shit back in Boston too, I know numerous dudes who overstayed their visa, married a US citizen, and they're all set to stay. Fuck, I know a Canadian-Bulgarian with no income, who got married, divorced, went rogue, got married again and now has a green card.
[close]

what do you mean by that exactly?

If you want to live in the nordic countries it generally is extremely beneficial for getting a job, since everyone gets a scholarship from the state, which means that almost no people in the universities stop before their masters. However I know that there is a huge demand for people with coding capabilities, so that specific field is easier to get in on, without a masters degree.

When I lived in Berlin, it was a very different story. The people who pursued a master's degree did it either to become very specialized in some hyper specific fields or to pursue a career in academia. A bachelor degree was - among the people I hung out with - generally seen as the key to enter the job market.

I'm not familiar with the job market in other countries.

Also - I have been visiting Berlin on and off for the last 15 years or so (it is not a lot further from the town I grew up in, than Copenhagen, so if I wanted to visit a bigger city, Hamburg or Berlin was just as much a choice). While it definitely has gotten a lot more expensive, it is still relatively a lot cheaper than the Scandinavian cities.

I still have some mental division between east and western Europe from the Cold War (which is stupid - and I have a deep love for the Eastern European countries!), but in the old western part of Europe, it has only been Lisboa, which have come off as actually cheap in the last 10 years, but I don't know how it is to live there - it is a beautiful city to visit, and they have amazing seafood!

Mark Renton

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #102 on: January 26, 2021, 02:07:34 AM »
I'm French and moved from Paris to Barcelona 3 years ago.

If you haven't decided yet, here are my 2 cents:

Paris:
* very expensive, if you don't plan on working that much, you'll end up stuck pretty much all the time because of the cost of living.
* rents are very high for small flats
* it does rain a lot, so skating from October to April can be a real struggle
* healthcare system is good, especially if you have Euro citizenship
* skate, music and art scenes are the best I've experienced in my life
* social life is great, easy to meet people and make friends through skating. Head to smaller spots like Jemmapes, Rue Léon Cladel or Palais de Tokyo if you want to meet people
* with the current situation, it will be hard to find a job and get started
* the city is full of stress, negativity and people thinking they're unique and better than everyone else
* there's literally nothing to do outside of the city, except maybe biking around. If you want to stay close to the country side, definitely not a good option.

Barcelona:
* cost of life is way better, rents are cheaper and getting down now that the tourists have fled the city.
* skate scene is a little bit harder to get into if you don't want to spend time in Parallel or Macba. FTC is a good place to start if you want to meet people, and lots of cool DIYs around and in the city
* the arts & music scene is pretty poor in my own experience. Hope you like house/electro because that's pretty much a lot of what you'll find
* weather is amazing, Catalan people can be pretty tough at first but they'll chill once they understand you're not here to get wasted and piss all over the city.
* healthcare system is really good, people speak english and are genuinely nice and caring for each others
* you can get to the mountains in 45 min, or 1h30 in the winter for skiing/snowboarding, then back to the beach in the evening for a couple drinks

I saw someone recommending northern Spain (Basque Country). I grew up in the region, Bilbao is really sick, surf scene is pretty strong too and you can get to the mountains in the winter. Food is amazing. It does rain a lot though, so you'll probably get some good weather from May to September, but the rest of the year you'll mostly be indoors.

Hope that helps, good luck with the move.

Wow thanks man! That was really helpful.
Yeah Paris seems just as stressful as London and I am trying to escape that mindset.
Might be considering BCN at this point. Already been there (but for a couple of days visiting and I was staying too close to Ramblas) and I fluently speak the language.

Which neighborhoods would you guys recommend? I'd like something kinda green with not a lot of noise/tourists but still central. I browsed the board here and Gracia/Pueblo Seco came up as recommended, but please chime in.

P.S. this thread rules and got my mind off lockdown misery.

Kianou_rivz

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #103 on: January 26, 2021, 03:36:01 AM »
Sure man, always cool to share that kind of experience. Gracia and Poble Sec are definitely good options, Gracia might be a bit more expensive though and Poble Sec you're at the bottom of Montjuic which is perfect for chilling and hiking. Clot neighborhood is also cool, lots of local life, bars, restaurants etc and Poblenou is definitely a good place to consider even though the rents have gone up recently (not too many tourists, and really close to the beach). Stay aways from Raval, Gotic is becoming a dead neighborhood now that all tourists are gone...

Let me know if you make the move, there are a bunch of admin things you have to go through that can be tricky.

Expand Quote
I'm French and moved from Paris to Barcelona 3 years ago.

If you haven't decided yet, here are my 2 cents:

Paris:
* very expensive, if you don't plan on working that much, you'll end up stuck pretty much all the time because of the cost of living.
* rents are very high for small flats
* it does rain a lot, so skating from October to April can be a real struggle
* healthcare system is good, especially if you have Euro citizenship
* skate, music and art scenes are the best I've experienced in my life
* social life is great, easy to meet people and make friends through skating. Head to smaller spots like Jemmapes, Rue Léon Cladel or Palais de Tokyo if you want to meet people
* with the current situation, it will be hard to find a job and get started
* the city is full of stress, negativity and people thinking they're unique and better than everyone else
* there's literally nothing to do outside of the city, except maybe biking around. If you want to stay close to the country side, definitely not a good option.

Barcelona:
* cost of life is way better, rents are cheaper and getting down now that the tourists have fled the city.
* skate scene is a little bit harder to get into if you don't want to spend time in Parallel or Macba. FTC is a good place to start if you want to meet people, and lots of cool DIYs around and in the city
* the arts & music scene is pretty poor in my own experience. Hope you like house/electro because that's pretty much a lot of what you'll find
* weather is amazing, Catalan people can be pretty tough at first but they'll chill once they understand you're not here to get wasted and piss all over the city.
* healthcare system is really good, people speak english and are genuinely nice and caring for each others
* you can get to the mountains in 45 min, or 1h30 in the winter for skiing/snowboarding, then back to the beach in the evening for a couple drinks

I saw someone recommending northern Spain (Basque Country). I grew up in the region, Bilbao is really sick, surf scene is pretty strong too and you can get to the mountains in the winter. Food is amazing. It does rain a lot though, so you'll probably get some good weather from May to September, but the rest of the year you'll mostly be indoors.

Hope that helps, good luck with the move.
[close]

Wow thanks man! That was really helpful.
Yeah Paris seems just as stressful as London and I am trying to escape that mindset.
Might be considering BCN at this point. Already been there (but for a couple of days visiting and I was staying too close to Ramblas) and I fluently speak the language.

Which neighborhoods would you guys recommend? I'd like something kinda green with not a lot of noise/tourists but still central. I browsed the board here and Gracia/Pueblo Seco came up as recommended, but please chime in.

P.S. this thread rules and got my mind off lockdown misery.


Expand Quote
I'm French and moved from Paris to Barcelona 3 years ago.

If you haven't decided yet, here are my 2 cents:

Paris:
* very expensive, if you don't plan on working that much, you'll end up stuck pretty much all the time because of the cost of living.
* rents are very high for small flats
* it does rain a lot, so skating from October to April can be a real struggle
* healthcare system is good, especially if you have Euro citizenship
* skate, music and art scenes are the best I've experienced in my life
* social life is great, easy to meet people and make friends through skating. Head to smaller spots like Jemmapes, Rue Léon Cladel or Palais de Tokyo if you want to meet people
* with the current situation, it will be hard to find a job and get started
* the city is full of stress, negativity and people thinking they're unique and better than everyone else
* there's literally nothing to do outside of the city, except maybe biking around. If you want to stay close to the country side, definitely not a good option.

Barcelona:
* cost of life is way better, rents are cheaper and getting down now that the tourists have fled the city.
* skate scene is a little bit harder to get into if you don't want to spend time in Parallel or Macba. FTC is a good place to start if you want to meet people, and lots of cool DIYs around and in the city
* the arts & music scene is pretty poor in my own experience. Hope you like house/electro because that's pretty much a lot of what you'll find
* weather is amazing, Catalan people can be pretty tough at first but they'll chill once they understand you're not here to get wasted and piss all over the city.
* healthcare system is really good, people speak english and are genuinely nice and caring for each others
* you can get to the mountains in 45 min, or 1h30 in the winter for skiing/snowboarding, then back to the beach in the evening for a couple drinks

I saw someone recommending northern Spain (Basque Country). I grew up in the region, Bilbao is really sick, surf scene is pretty strong too and you can get to the mountains in the winter. Food is amazing. It does rain a lot though, so you'll probably get some good weather from May to September, but the rest of the year you'll mostly be indoors.

Hope that helps, good luck with the move.
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Paris description pretty spot on too!
and yeah, it is a stressful city....no wonder when you consider it has 2 times the population density of NY, 3 times that of London.
But still...I kinda miss the "fuck you" attitude of Paris to be honest. People there don't take bullshit. actually I miss Paris period, but it could very well be that if I moved back, I'd be sick of it again in 6 months....

Yeah I do miss it too from time to time, especially around Spring/Summer. There were definitely some great times and memories, but I guess I'll enjoy it more if I go back there for short periods of time rather than moving back.

Giza Butler

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #104 on: January 26, 2021, 05:29:53 AM »

Which neighborhoods would you guys recommend? I'd like something kinda green with not a lot of noise/tourists but still central. I browsed the board here and Gracia/Pueblo Seco came up as recommended, but please chime in.

P.S. this thread rules and got my mind off lockdown misery.


I haven't been actively looking at flats but as I've heard, a lot of opportunities opened up. Flats that before were only rented as Airb'n'b are now on the market. You'll still be looking at 7/8 hundred a month depending on the flat condition and the area.

I would suggest not going too far out but as well avoid Gotico and the center in general.

Clot is a very good option, it's close enough to the beach and not that far out, plus there are plenty of spots, but like every other neighbourhood here. 
The '80s were the worst period. You had these horrible pop bands growing their hair and calling themselves metal.

carlosthelizard

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #105 on: February 07, 2021, 11:46:29 PM »
Hey, not sure if this has been suggested as a place to work if you want a steady paycheck (usually) a living wage to get your feet off the ground :

https://teleperformance.com

The best way to find job listings is to google the country you are curious about with teleperformance in the search field.

Call center jobs are plentiful in southern Europe, and you will likely get hired as a native English speaker.  This kind of job could help as a backup plan if you are ever unemployed, or just want to spend a few months in a country skating.

They should also be able to help provide a work Visa allowing you to stay more than 90+ days in Europe (usually it's a year work visa that is renewed, but kind of different for each country).

I have known and met a few skaters who work the call center hustle for a bit just as a way to travel and spend time in another country / culture.  They usually ended up quitting and going back home because the job sucks though (pretty much just a revolving door of jaded employees).

Hope this helps somehow and good luck.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2021, 11:54:14 PM by carlosthelizard »

Frank

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Re: EURO PALS: I am moving from the US to the EU (please help!)
« Reply #106 on: February 27, 2021, 02:50:35 AM »
i have no recommendations but if happen to be lost in hamburg, germany, dm me and i hook you up for a spot to crash.