Author Topic: hvx/hpx scene files  (Read 555 times)

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fickdiepolizei666

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hvx/hpx scene files
« on: November 01, 2020, 10:48:21 AM »
i recently bought a hvx to film long lens with and i use a gh4 for fisheye. is anyone else running this setup or a similar one and can give me some tips on the scene files?

ferbmx

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Re: hvx/hpx scene files
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2020, 03:42:11 PM »
You should check this out. Its a good starting point!

http://www.panasonic.com/business/iframes/scene-files.asp?model=HVX200

ferbmx

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Re: hvx/hpx scene files
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2020, 05:04:01 PM »
i recently bought a hvx to film long lens with and i use a gh4 for fisheye. is anyone else running this setup or a similar one and can give me some tips on the scene files?

http://www.filmrocks.com/pdf/hvx_scene_files.pdf

ce5hice

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Re: hvx/hpx scene files
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2020, 12:04:22 PM »
I'll share my scene files and tips since I'm sick of seeing crappy footage that looks blurry, overexposed, too warm/cold and other no-nos that detract from clips. All scene files use Video Cam, Chroma Phase=0, Color Temp=0, A Iris Level=0, Skin Tone Dtl=Off, Knee=Auto. These are in HVX scale instead of the finer grained HPX scale, so HPX-users should approximate accordingly.

I just realized I never use Normal color matrix, I think I made a decision to move to Enriched because it captured a little more blue/green, and wasn't overly warm all the time.

I feel like most filmers nowadays tend to use one of the Cine gammas or just standard HD norm. I'm a huge fan of B. Press though and have moved to almost always using it lately.

These scene files aren't gonna be worth shit if you don't know how to properly white balance the camera. It's more than just focusing on something white and hitting that button. The basic logic is, if you give it something warm, it will cool it down, and vice versa- if you give it something cool, it will warm it up. So have a couple different warm vs cool shades of white paper in your camera bag to play around with as you set white balances A and B, or find different examples of "white" in your environment. I prefer a slightlywarm look from this camera and I feel like most other people do too. Also play around with white balancing in the shade vs. in the sun. Be critical of your picture; you can achieve awesome looking colors natively in camera with some patience and playing around.

Other tips:

Adjust your gain settings to 6db for low and 9 for high. Any higher really looks like shit unless you are gonna take the time to clean it up in post.

If you're filming 60 frames a second, e.g. either 720p/60p or 1080i/60p, don't film at 1/60 shutter speed. It's a lot more smear when you pan quickly vs. 1/120. You could use 1/120 and gain at 6 or 9db, and with the right gamma/matrix and other settings, it'll look pretty good.

SCENE 1 - HDNORM - Standard HD look, if not a bit noisy. Shadows look more vibrant and less soft/grey than in other scene files.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +4
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL 0
MASTER PED -3
GAMMA HDNORM
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 2 SOFT - Probably the most organic looking image out of the camera. No extra sharpening. B-press is like a half way point between a cinematic and "digital video" image, and definitely the least noisy out of all the gammas. Paired with Cine-like matrix, the colors are too saturated to my eye, so I backed off the color a bit.

DETAIL LEVEL -7
V DETAIL LEVEL -7
DETAIL CORING -2
CHROMA LEVEL -4
MASTER PED -1
GAMMA B.PRESS
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 3 BPRESS - Like Soft, but sharper. It's a tie for cleanest picture between these 2, and I film with them 90% of the time.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +4
DETAIL CORING +7
CHROMA LEVEL +1
MASTER PED +1
GAMMA B.PRESS
MATRIX ENRICHED

SCENE 4 HIGH - Good for low-light. Noisy as expected.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL 0
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA HIGH
MATRIX ENRICHED

SCENE 5 CINEV - The Panasonic look. Again, backed off the color a bit.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL -2
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA CINELIKE V
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 6 CINE D - Best for capturing shadow detail / dynamic range if you actually intend to color correct or grade in post. Kinda noisy, I rarely use it.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL +1
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA CINELIKE D
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

bataaard

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Re: hvx/hpx scene files
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2020, 01:21:20 PM »
thanks for sharing.
can we see your videos to know what to expect from these scenes ?

ferbmx

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Re: hvx/hpx scene files
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2020, 03:47:35 PM »
I'll share my scene files and tips since I'm sick of seeing crappy footage that looks blurry, overexposed, too warm/cold and other no-nos that detract from clips. All scene files use Video Cam, Chroma Phase=0, Color Temp=0, A Iris Level=0, Skin Tone Dtl=Off, Knee=Auto. These are in HVX scale instead of the finer grained HPX scale, so HPX-users should approximate accordingly.

I just realized I never use Normal color matrix, I think I made a decision to move to Enriched because it captured a little more blue/green, and wasn't overly warm all the time.

I feel like most filmers nowadays tend to use one of the Cine gammas or just standard HD norm. I'm a huge fan of B. Press though and have moved to almost always using it lately.

These scene files aren't gonna be worth shit if you don't know how to properly white balance the camera. It's more than just focusing on something white and hitting that button. The basic logic is, if you give it something warm, it will cool it down, and vice versa- if you give it something cool, it will warm it up. So have a couple different warm vs cool shades of white paper in your camera bag to play around with as you set white balances A and B, or find different examples of "white" in your environment. I prefer a slightlywarm look from this camera and I feel like most other people do too. Also play around with white balancing in the shade vs. in the sun. Be critical of your picture; you can achieve awesome looking colors natively in camera with some patience and playing around.

Other tips:

Adjust your gain settings to 6db for low and 9 for high. Any higher really looks like shit unless you are gonna take the time to clean it up in post.

If you're filming 60 frames a second, e.g. either 720p/60p or 1080i/60p, don't film at 1/60 shutter speed. It's a lot more smear when you pan quickly vs. 1/120. You could use 1/120 and gain at 6 or 9db, and with the right gamma/matrix and other settings, it'll look pretty good.

SCENE 1 - HDNORM - Standard HD look, if not a bit noisy. Shadows look more vibrant and less soft/grey than in other scene files.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +4
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL 0
MASTER PED -3
GAMMA HDNORM
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 2 SOFT - Probably the most organic looking image out of the camera. No extra sharpening. B-press is like a half way point between a cinematic and "digital video" image, and definitely the least noisy out of all the gammas. Paired with Cine-like matrix, the colors are too saturated to my eye, so I backed off the color a bit.

DETAIL LEVEL -7
V DETAIL LEVEL -7
DETAIL CORING -2
CHROMA LEVEL -4
MASTER PED -1
GAMMA B.PRESS
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 3 BPRESS - Like Soft, but sharper. It's a tie for cleanest picture between these 2, and I film with them 90% of the time.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +4
DETAIL CORING +7
CHROMA LEVEL +1
MASTER PED +1
GAMMA B.PRESS
MATRIX ENRICHED

SCENE 4 HIGH - Good for low-light. Noisy as expected.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL 0
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA HIGH
MATRIX ENRICHED

SCENE 5 CINEV - The Panasonic look. Again, backed off the color a bit.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL -2
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA CINELIKE V
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 6 CINE D - Best for capturing shadow detail / dynamic range if you actually intend to color correct or grade in post. Kinda noisy, I rarely use it.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL +1
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA CINELIKE D
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

Thanks for sharing and keeping this important topic about filming going. As you said, its many "filmers" out there not putting any attention to it or not even doing proper white balance. I feel like many dudes got a Panasonic camera because its trendy without knowing or taking any advantage of the good features of these cameras as Scene Files.

I would like to mention that the "sweet spot" for the HVX200, HPX170 and HMC150 is the 720p mode at highest bitrate, that it looks better than 1080i mode. Although you can set it to 1920x1080, you don't get any more useful resolution that way, and the compression artefacts are a bit more visible. So shoot 720p/60p ("P" stands for progressive), the pictures are significantly better because the compression is less severe because it doesn't have to deal with interlace.
If someone is looking for a 1080p Native camera should go for the AC-160 (records in SD cards) or the HPX250 (records in P2 cards), but the HVX200, HPX170 and HMC150 are all 720p native, not FULL HD (1080). Later on, you always can upscale to 1080/30p for a better playback on Youtube (or even 2560x1440 like I do).

Also I use Cinelike D, even if its a little bit noisy, but the final image is beautiful.

Here´s a look of how my shit looks like:
https://youtu.be/ddSDXkxSQ4g

bataaard

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Re: hvx/hpx scene files
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2020, 05:31:33 PM »
Expand Quote
I'll share my scene files and tips since I'm sick of seeing crappy footage that looks blurry, overexposed, too warm/cold and other no-nos that detract from clips. All scene files use Video Cam, Chroma Phase=0, Color Temp=0, A Iris Level=0, Skin Tone Dtl=Off, Knee=Auto. These are in HVX scale instead of the finer grained HPX scale, so HPX-users should approximate accordingly.

I just realized I never use Normal color matrix, I think I made a decision to move to Enriched because it captured a little more blue/green, and wasn't overly warm all the time.

I feel like most filmers nowadays tend to use one of the Cine gammas or just standard HD norm. I'm a huge fan of B. Press though and have moved to almost always using it lately.

These scene files aren't gonna be worth shit if you don't know how to properly white balance the camera. It's more than just focusing on something white and hitting that button. The basic logic is, if you give it something warm, it will cool it down, and vice versa- if you give it something cool, it will warm it up. So have a couple different warm vs cool shades of white paper in your camera bag to play around with as you set white balances A and B, or find different examples of "white" in your environment. I prefer a slightlywarm look from this camera and I feel like most other people do too. Also play around with white balancing in the shade vs. in the sun. Be critical of your picture; you can achieve awesome looking colors natively in camera with some patience and playing around.

Other tips:

Adjust your gain settings to 6db for low and 9 for high. Any higher really looks like shit unless you are gonna take the time to clean it up in post.

If you're filming 60 frames a second, e.g. either 720p/60p or 1080i/60p, don't film at 1/60 shutter speed. It's a lot more smear when you pan quickly vs. 1/120. You could use 1/120 and gain at 6 or 9db, and with the right gamma/matrix and other settings, it'll look pretty good.

SCENE 1 - HDNORM - Standard HD look, if not a bit noisy. Shadows look more vibrant and less soft/grey than in other scene files.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +4
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL 0
MASTER PED -3
GAMMA HDNORM
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 2 SOFT - Probably the most organic looking image out of the camera. No extra sharpening. B-press is like a half way point between a cinematic and "digital video" image, and definitely the least noisy out of all the gammas. Paired with Cine-like matrix, the colors are too saturated to my eye, so I backed off the color a bit.

DETAIL LEVEL -7
V DETAIL LEVEL -7
DETAIL CORING -2
CHROMA LEVEL -4
MASTER PED -1
GAMMA B.PRESS
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 3 BPRESS - Like Soft, but sharper. It's a tie for cleanest picture between these 2, and I film with them 90% of the time.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +4
DETAIL CORING +7
CHROMA LEVEL +1
MASTER PED +1
GAMMA B.PRESS
MATRIX ENRICHED

SCENE 4 HIGH - Good for low-light. Noisy as expected.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL 0
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA HIGH
MATRIX ENRICHED

SCENE 5 CINEV - The Panasonic look. Again, backed off the color a bit.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL -2
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA CINELIKE V
MATRIX CINE-LIKE

SCENE 6 CINE D - Best for capturing shadow detail / dynamic range if you actually intend to color correct or grade in post. Kinda noisy, I rarely use it.

DETAIL LEVEL +4
V DETAIL LEVEL +2
DETAIL CORING +4
CHROMA LEVEL +1
MASTER PED 0
GAMMA CINELIKE D
MATRIX CINE-LIKE
[close]

Thanks for sharing and keeping this important topic about filming going. As you said, its many "filmers" out there not putting any attention to it or not even doing proper white balance. I feel like many dudes got a Panasonic camera because its trendy without knowing or taking any advantage of the good features of these cameras as Scene Files.

I would like to mention that the "sweet spot" for the HVX200, HPX170 and HMC150 is the 720p mode at highest bitrate, that it looks better than 1080i mode. Although you can set it to 1920x1080, you don't get any more useful resolution that way, and the compression artefacts are a bit more visible. So shoot 720p/60p ("P" stands for progressive), the pictures are significantly better because the compression is less severe because it doesn't have to deal with interlace.
If someone is looking for a 1080p Native camera should go for the AC-160 (records in SD cards) or the HPX250 (records in P2 cards), but the HVX200, HPX170 and HMC150 are all 720p native, not FULL HD (1080). Later on, you always can upscale to 1080/30p for a better playback on Youtube (or even 2560x1440 like I do).

Also I use Cinelike D, even if its a little bit noisy, but the final image is beautiful.

Here´s a look of how my shit looks like:
https://youtu.be/ddSDXkxSQ4g

what camera / scene file are you using here ? thanks

minerals

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Re: hvx/hpx scene files
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2021, 01:44:15 PM »
Thanks for sharing and keeping this important topic about filming going. As you said, its many "filmers" out there not putting any attention to it or not even doing proper white balance. I feel like many dudes got a Panasonic camera because its trendy without knowing or taking any advantage of the good features of these cameras as Scene Files.

I would like to mention that the "sweet spot" for the HVX200, HPX170 and HMC150 is the 720p mode at highest bitrate, that it looks better than 1080i mode. Although you can set it to 1920x1080, you don't get any more useful resolution that way, and the compression artefacts are a bit more visible. So shoot 720p/60p ("P" stands for progressive), the pictures are significantly better because the compression is less severe because it doesn't have to deal with interlace.
If someone is looking for a 1080p Native camera should go for the AC-160 (records in SD cards) or the HPX250 (records in P2 cards), but the HVX200, HPX170 and HMC150 are all 720p native, not FULL HD (1080). Later on, you always can upscale to 1080/30p for a better playback on Youtube (or even 2560x1440 like I do).

Also I use Cinelike D, even if its a little bit noisy, but the final image is beautiful.

Here´s a look of how my shit looks like:
https://youtu.be/ddSDXkxSQ4g
[/quote]

Man your footy looks so nice. Could you share your scene files & possible your upload settings for YouTube? (The part i always always struggle with is getting it to look nice on YouTube! Thanks in advance.