Author Topic: 90s pushing  (Read 612 times)

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Mean salto

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90s pushing
« on: October 04, 2021, 07:41:01 PM »
Been watching a lot of 90s videos lately and noticed people used to push with their foot really far back. Heel on the back bolts. Any older skaters know what this was about? Was it to disguise switch mongo? Or was it just an onion on your belt?

GardenSkater77

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2021, 07:54:44 PM »
No clue. Never noticed but definitely interested. What parts in particular?

I personally do all my tricks with my front foot behind the front bolts because I started skating a board with no nose. Also, if you wanted to Ollie higher you’d place your front foot further back.

Next time I skate I’ll take note of my front footwhile pushing. I believe it is in back of the front bolts.

CannerSpaghetti

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2021, 09:04:31 PM »
If it's the bpsw era maybe foot further back made it easier to get speed with those bearing condoms?
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Mean salto

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2021, 09:18:53 PM »
Not bpsw era more mid 90s to 2000s. I should of taken notes for exact examples but the videos I've been watching are sub zero real life, sheep shoes life of leisure, physics wheels, alien workshop timecode, rising, cigar city, toy machine

GardenSkater77

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2021, 03:12:41 PM »
I got one that came to mind…

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Xik9C_RAsCA

I really think it has to do with when you started skateboarding.

I think you are on to something. My hypothesis is that skateboarding has evolved to a more forward center of gravity stance.

If you look at skaters that started before 1992 they will, on average, push with their foot further back than skaters that began in the switch stance era.

I will say that when Tom Penny and Marc Johnson hit my friends and I started to open up our stance more so and I would have to imagine new skaters in 95’ would just begin not favoring a stance and keeping their legs wide.

GardenSkater77

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2021, 03:47:00 PM »
I just watched the Sheep Video and I noticed that Charlie Wilkins and Brian Anderson both pushed with their foot further back right before popping a juicy Ollie. Charlie over a tennis net and Brian over a railing.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Mc-_t0Auzyw

ChuckRamone

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2021, 04:40:17 PM »
There was also a thing in the 90s where skaters pushed more lightly, using mostly their toes. Does anyone know what I'm talking about? Like they wanted to make it look like they weren't putting too much effort into pushing. Koston comes to mind as a major example of this.

biaherl

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2021, 07:19:06 PM »
I still try to push that way to this day

I think the foot thing is all about the time we were in. I remember so much emphasis being put on the slide of your front foot to do all the tricks being invented. It took some time (after skateparks) that people realized you can get the same flick keeping you feet closer to the pockets

I told someone the other day who was using their whole foot to push to push with his pinky toe. He stared pushing faster than he was used to and went back to using his heel in a disgusting manner

silhouette

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2021, 03:56:04 AM »
There was also a thing in the 90s where skaters pushed more lightly, using mostly their toes. Does anyone know what I'm talking about? Like they wanted to make it look like they weren't putting too much effort into pushing. Koston comes to mind as a major example of this.

That ended on a funny note because I've heard Koston brought up as the counterexample to exactly what you're describing so many times. Most other skaters usually had a compromise of their own in between a fine and solid push, while Koston was that guy looking like he just wanted the job done and would swongo his way to the next wooden pyramid switch heel without a care in the world if he looked like Goofy trying operate a bulldozer.

natenola forever

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2021, 12:25:21 PM »
the pushing may have had more to do with the style of standing, from around 92 on everything was anti 80s, 70s, slash hash style, you didn't wanna look like Salba or Tommy Guerreo or even Natas sidewalk surfing. Dudes started to stand more upright and bend their knees a lot less. I even remember watching Chet Thomas do some amazing stuff and just not getting into it cuz he had that crazy low surf style, very hunched over with a lot of knee bend, I think a combination Stereo, Anti hero, and Tom Penny' crazy style really opened it up for you to really be able to crouch down and use your knees and bend your back. When your pushing standing straight up you gotta put a little more toe into it, when you bend your knees you can properly put your foot on the ground.

Mean salto

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2021, 01:40:47 AM »
The style of skater I've doing the foot far back on the board push is more the hesh big wheels type not so much the fresh girl type. More mid to late 90s

matty_c

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2021, 03:07:58 AM »
Expand Quote
There was also a thing in the 90s where skaters pushed more lightly, using mostly their toes. Does anyone know what I'm talking about? Like they wanted to make it look like they weren't putting too much effort into pushing. Koston comes to mind as a major example of this.
[close]

That ended on a funny note because I've heard Koston brought up as the counterexample to exactly what you're describing so many times. Most other skaters usually had a compromise of their own in between a fine and solid push, while Koston was that guy looking like he just wanted the job done and would swongo his way to the next wooden pyramid switch heel without a care in the world if he looked like Goofy trying operate a bulldozer.

That was fucking beautiful mate
I love koston, or at least his skating back in the day
listen to cosmic psychos

MaXX_I-D

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2021, 09:51:11 AM »
Koston has my favorite swongo.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 07:38:32 PM by MaXX_I-D »
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xandeo

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2021, 11:51:15 PM »
I find myself pushing with the back foot rather to the back as well - reason being it's easier to steer the board left/right at higher speeds than putting the foot further to the front. Especially when pushing on the street among cars.

Then once I put both feet on the board, the front foot goes to the front bolts automatically.

That would be my logic...?

Mean salto

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2021, 12:43:26 AM »
Yeah I dunno. I don't think I can explain what I mean properly and don't want to re-watch a few hours of videos to refund the times it happened.

Basically the skater will be skating regular but then when they push it looks like they are pushing switch mongo but they then put their back foot back on the tail so this isn't about actual switch mongo.
I feel much less stable when I push switch Mongo at speed so I don't know if that's it. Or it just depends on the person.
Gardenskater77 and biaherl made decent points. It's probably just the idea was you set your front foot further back to do a bigger Ollie.

Even if untrue Im keeping my theory it's to disguise switch mongo.

silhouette

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2021, 01:13:05 AM »
Yeah I dunno. I don't think I can explain what I mean properly and don't want to re-watch a few hours of videos to refund the times it happened.

Basically the skater will be skating regular but then when they push it looks like they are pushing switch mongo but they then put their back foot back on the tail so this isn't about actual switch mongo.
I feel much less stable when I push switch Mongo at speed so I don't know if that's it. Or it just depends on the person.
Gardenskater77 and biaherl made decent points. It's probably just the idea was you set your front foot further back to do a bigger Ollie.

Even if untrue Im keeping my theory it's to disguise switch mongo.

I think the optimal pushing technique (if there really is one, because everyone will make their own way work anyhow) is front foot at the center of the board, and then whether you want to put more weight at the front or back (for stability or momentum) is dictated by muscular flexion, basically either standing up on your toes for more weight at the front or heel for more weight at the back. So sort of like subtly pedaling with that foot too and not just the one on the ground as to optimize the motion, sort of similarly to how a skilled swimmer would (with an extra object thrown into the equations I guess). At least that's how it feels like when I'm trying to push fast, e.g.. down a road and without tricks in mind. But it surely depends on the skater and their body type and stance, e.g.. how perpendicularly open their shoulders and how parallel their pushing foot are when they stand on a board.

So skaters placing their foot closer to the tail when they push sort of makes sense both for stability and speed. Probably subconsciously for most, it means that you're really pushing the skateboard/object ahead of you and building up on speed every time, whereas foot closer to the nose feels more like you're dragging it behind you and so mostly makes sense in spots where you have to go slow or in crowded situations. Imagine doing a one-footed wheelie, then a one-footed nosewheelie for an extreme example of what I mean. The first one feels like you're kind of driving the skateboard in front of you, whereas the second one is a lot scarier going fast for a reason, most of the geometry of the object you're riding is behind you and so the weights, friction and stability are different and you're way more likely to spin out of control due to how both the object and your body are designed.

I do swongo but mine is weird, I basically push regs with my front foot in the center of the board, maybe further to the back for stability and then once I'm done picking up my speed I hop back on switch. I can push regular switch but that's breaking 20+ years of habit and muscle memory and most importantly, right now I wouldn't do it to pick up speed switch exactly because I have yet to develop that control over the mobility and muscle memory in what's normally my pushing foot for the technique to feel just as stable as regs.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2021, 01:24:59 AM by silhouette »

Thom

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Re: 90s pushing
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2021, 08:07:44 AM »
The reason was you’re more likely to not get pitched while pushing over a pebble or a crack with your foot further back