Author Topic: What are you trying to learn right now?  (Read 33828 times)

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pizzafliptofakie

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #780 on: July 19, 2022, 09:01:03 AM »
Switch pop shove is all in the big toe, if you lodge it in the right place of the tail (usually covering the tip but with the ball of the foot mostly resting inside) it will ensure the board will stay flat as it's a 'neutral' part that will rebound, that's how and why done right those can look like they barely ever leave your feet, usually I just think Jan Kliewer or Alex Carolino or most people from the Lordz/Square era really for a reference (it's also one of those tricks where you mostly face backwards, like switch ollies, otherwise it can be tempting to turn frontside unless you lock your upper body in place). Key to good front shove is try and eliminate all scoop, just pop straight down (again from the right spot on the tail so it doesn't start flipping) and watch the bolts come around. With that technique though just doing one frontside pressure flip once will fuck me up on them for days.

Can you elaborate a bit on that front shuv tip?


Front shuvs are sort of a monkey's paw trick for me where I can do them every try, but I hate how I do them. I do the the kind where you sorta jump backwards and I've tried every foot placement to prevent it. 

silhouette

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #781 on: July 19, 2022, 09:28:29 AM »
Expand Quote
Switch pop shove is all in the big toe, if you lodge it in the right place of the tail (usually covering the tip but with the ball of the foot mostly resting inside) it will ensure the board will stay flat as it's a 'neutral' part that will rebound, that's how and why done right those can look like they barely ever leave your feet, usually I just think Jan Kliewer or Alex Carolino or most people from the Lordz/Square era really for a reference (it's also one of those tricks where you mostly face backwards, like switch ollies, otherwise it can be tempting to turn frontside unless you lock your upper body in place). Key to good front shove is try and eliminate all scoop, just pop straight down (again from the right spot on the tail so it doesn't start flipping) and watch the bolts come around. With that technique though just doing one frontside pressure flip once will fuck me up on them for days.
[close]

Can you elaborate a bit on that front shuv tip?


Front shuvs are sort of a monkey's paw trick for me where I can do them every try, but I hate how I do them. I do the the kind where you sorta jump backwards and I've tried every foot placement to prevent it.

Yeah, basically the logic is similar to what I was describing with the switch pop shove, just reversed, in both cases you want the center of the tail to hit the ground in an explosive manner (doesn't have to be strong pop - although that works too - but has to be sudden and fierce). On all pop shoves, if the board is (barely noticeably) off axis as the tail hits the ground because your foot positioning was applying pressure over incorrect spots, basically that's when the board starts flipping. For optimal technique and good control you want to think 'modified ollie' on those tricks and form them on your way up then catch them which is the only thing the front foot really has to do, which means you can drive pretty much all the force you put into the trick into completely vertical pop just from being set up right. A lot of the scoop is purely stylistic and optional if you want it to be (unless you're doing non-popped shoves), ties back into how I was saying pop shoves can feel like ollies when they don't leave your feet.

I had to dig deep for that one, but I found some I filmed for a shop Instagram back in 2016 with that technique, may be a better visualization:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BI8tLbWjSGo/

Apparently I also had one for switch front bigs, may be a better reference since I seem to remember you're regular (I had completely forgotten about those clips until now):

https://www.instagram.com/p/BJfA465D7uH/

pizzafliptofakie

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #782 on: July 19, 2022, 09:30:32 AM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Switch pop shove is all in the big toe, if you lodge it in the right place of the tail (usually covering the tip but with the ball of the foot mostly resting inside) it will ensure the board will stay flat as it's a 'neutral' part that will rebound, that's how and why done right those can look like they barely ever leave your feet, usually I just think Jan Kliewer or Alex Carolino or most people from the Lordz/Square era really for a reference (it's also one of those tricks where you mostly face backwards, like switch ollies, otherwise it can be tempting to turn frontside unless you lock your upper body in place). Key to good front shove is try and eliminate all scoop, just pop straight down (again from the right spot on the tail so it doesn't start flipping) and watch the bolts come around. With that technique though just doing one frontside pressure flip once will fuck me up on them for days.
[close]

Can you elaborate a bit on that front shuv tip?


Front shuvs are sort of a monkey's paw trick for me where I can do them every try, but I hate how I do them. I do the the kind where you sorta jump backwards and I've tried every foot placement to prevent it.
[close]

Yeah, basically the logic is similar to what I was describing with the switch pop shove, just reversed, in both cases you want the center of the tail to hit the ground in an explosive manner (doesn't have to be strong pop - although that works too - but has to be sudden and fierce). On all shoves, if the board is (barely noticeably) off axis as the tail hits the ground because your foot positioning was applying pressure over incorrect spots, basically that's when the board starts flipping. For optimal technique and good control you want to think 'modified ollie' on those tricks and form them on your way up then catch them which is the only thing the front foot really has to do, which means you can drive pretty much all the force you put into the trick into completely vertical pop just from being set up right. A lot of the scoop is purely stylistic and optional if you want it to be (unless you're doing non-popped shoves), ties back into how I was saying pop shoves can feel like ollies when they don't leave your feet.

I had to dig deep for that one, but I found some I filmed for a shop Instagram back in 2016 with that technique, may be a better visualization:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BI8tLbWjSGo/



Very interesting. I've never heard it explained in those terms but that makes perfect sense. Definitely gonna go experiment with this.



You have quite a way with words when it comes to tricks!

MadeYouLook

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #783 on: July 19, 2022, 11:10:56 AM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Switch pop shove is all in the big toe, if you lodge it in the right place of the tail (usually covering the tip but with the ball of the foot mostly resting inside) it will ensure the board will stay flat as it's a 'neutral' part that will rebound, that's how and why done right those can look like they barely ever leave your feet, usually I just think Jan Kliewer or Alex Carolino or most people from the Lordz/Square era really for a reference (it's also one of those tricks where you mostly face backwards, like switch ollies, otherwise it can be tempting to turn frontside unless you lock your upper body in place). Key to good front shove is try and eliminate all scoop, just pop straight down (again from the right spot on the tail so it doesn't start flipping) and watch the bolts come around. With that technique though just doing one frontside pressure flip once will fuck me up on them for days.
[close]

Can you elaborate a bit on that front shuv tip?


Front shuvs are sort of a monkey's paw trick for me where I can do them every try, but I hate how I do them. I do the the kind where you sorta jump backwards and I've tried every foot placement to prevent it.
[close]

Yeah, basically the logic is similar to what I was describing with the switch pop shove, just reversed, in both cases you want the center of the tail to hit the ground in an explosive manner (doesn't have to be strong pop - although that works too - but has to be sudden and fierce). On all shoves, if the board is (barely noticeably) off axis as the tail hits the ground because your foot positioning was applying pressure over incorrect spots, basically that's when the board starts flipping. For optimal technique and good control you want to think 'modified ollie' on those tricks and form them on your way up then catch them which is the only thing the front foot really has to do, which means you can drive pretty much all the force you put into the trick into completely vertical pop just from being set up right. A lot of the scoop is purely stylistic and optional if you want it to be (unless you're doing non-popped shoves), ties back into how I was saying pop shoves can feel like ollies when they don't leave your feet.

I had to dig deep for that one, but I found some I filmed for a shop Instagram back in 2016 with that technique, may be a better visualization:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BI8tLbWjSGo/
[close]



Very interesting. I've never heard it explained in those terms but that makes perfect sense. Definitely gonna go experiment with this.



You have quite a way with words when it comes to tricks!


To reiterate and add to what Silhouette wrote...

The whole trick is the force you apply with your back foot. Your front foot is simply there to catch it.
As a result it helps me imagine that my back foot is pushing / passing the board to my front foot.

When I do them regular the pop is snappier so the board rotates quicker and goes higher.

When I do them switch the pop is heavier so the board rotates slower and lower... but it looks like a more effortless trick

The thing to note with both ways is the pop and the body is a straight up and down motion like Silhouette said.

pizzafliptofakie

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #784 on: July 19, 2022, 11:25:24 AM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Switch pop shove is all in the big toe, if you lodge it in the right place of the tail (usually covering the tip but with the ball of the foot mostly resting inside) it will ensure the board will stay flat as it's a 'neutral' part that will rebound, that's how and why done right those can look like they barely ever leave your feet, usually I just think Jan Kliewer or Alex Carolino or most people from the Lordz/Square era really for a reference (it's also one of those tricks where you mostly face backwards, like switch ollies, otherwise it can be tempting to turn frontside unless you lock your upper body in place). Key to good front shove is try and eliminate all scoop, just pop straight down (again from the right spot on the tail so it doesn't start flipping) and watch the bolts come around. With that technique though just doing one frontside pressure flip once will fuck me up on them for days.
[close]

Can you elaborate a bit on that front shuv tip?


Front shuvs are sort of a monkey's paw trick for me where I can do them every try, but I hate how I do them. I do the the kind where you sorta jump backwards and I've tried every foot placement to prevent it.
[close]

Yeah, basically the logic is similar to what I was describing with the switch pop shove, just reversed, in both cases you want the center of the tail to hit the ground in an explosive manner (doesn't have to be strong pop - although that works too - but has to be sudden and fierce). On all shoves, if the board is (barely noticeably) off axis as the tail hits the ground because your foot positioning was applying pressure over incorrect spots, basically that's when the board starts flipping. For optimal technique and good control you want to think 'modified ollie' on those tricks and form them on your way up then catch them which is the only thing the front foot really has to do, which means you can drive pretty much all the force you put into the trick into completely vertical pop just from being set up right. A lot of the scoop is purely stylistic and optional if you want it to be (unless you're doing non-popped shoves), ties back into how I was saying pop shoves can feel like ollies when they don't leave your feet.

I had to dig deep for that one, but I found some I filmed for a shop Instagram back in 2016 with that technique, may be a better visualization:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BI8tLbWjSGo/
[close]



Very interesting. I've never heard it explained in those terms but that makes perfect sense. Definitely gonna go experiment with this.



You have quite a way with words when it comes to tricks!
[close]


To reiterate and add to what Silhouette wrote...

The whole trick is the force you apply with your back foot. Your front foot is simply there to catch it.
As a result it helps me imagine that my back foot is pushing / passing the board to my front foot.

When I do them regular the pop is snappier so the board rotates quicker and goes higher.

When I do them switch the pop is heavier so the board rotates slower and lower... but it looks like a more effortless trick

The thing to note with both ways is the pop and the body is a straight up and down motion like Silhouette said.

I like this analogy. I'm very excited to try this. I always did them with my back foot, but I always scooped real hard not considering his point about the board being off axis.




LebowskisRug

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #785 on: August 06, 2022, 07:30:25 AM »
Slappy back feebles on a parking block and backside disasters. I dunno what I'm doing wrong with either as they seem simple but it's like I don't even get close. I can slappy front feeble and frontside disaster so it kinda doesn't make sense.

Easy Slider

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #786 on: August 06, 2022, 12:08:50 PM »
Working my way up to higher back 50/50s. Can do slappy, can pop on very low curbs but then it gets complicated.

I also tried roll on front crooks, looks easy but it's quite gnarly to commit.
why come?

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silhouette

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Re: What are you trying to learn right now?
« Reply #787 on: August 07, 2022, 02:06:22 AM »
As a result it helps me imagine that my back foot is pushing / passing the board to my front foot.

Yes, great advice, this is big. The technique is especially visible in that switch frontside bigspin video I shamelessly posted above and am shamelessly referencing again, the way I'm doing them is I'm popping to pass the board from the back foot to the front foot and then with the shoulders I keep going after the catch for what really feels like a late 180, but the lower body technique is the same (and keeping going with the shoulders allows for more energy put into the trick as well, meaning that learning frontside bigspins like that might actually really help flesh out the technique since incorporated into such a motion it must be easier).

Wildcard question but @MadeYouLook (... made you look) did you ever get the 'passing from one foot to the next' tip from that one random ass fucking twenty-year-old Kingpin trick tip booklet thing that went around Europe as a bonus in one of the issues, because there was one that described how to do frontside bigspins like that. Actually it always stuck with me and probably is the reason why I learned switch frontside bigspins the way I always did them since and not as a sw front pop with a pivoted landing like I used to as a kid. Would be funny if it were the same advice that had stuck with you too.