Author Topic: books to read  (Read 372964 times)

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Grind King Rims

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3480 on: February 17, 2021, 09:07:16 AM »
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dont know if anyones mentioned this, but this book is fucking incredible. and its true. read it. i started reading it a second time as soon as i finished.
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Got that one based on this recommendation, so thanks. Is there anything comparable but shedding more light on the loyalist side of the conflict?



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nicotinewheel

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3481 on: February 17, 2021, 09:11:24 AM »
this thread is great, big thanks for linking z library.
currently reading and enjoying this one-


DaleSr

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3482 on: February 17, 2021, 09:27:42 AM »
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dont know if anyones mentioned this, but this book is fucking incredible. and its true. read it. i started reading it a second time as soon as i finished.
[close]

Got that one based on this recommendation, so thanks. Is there anything comparable but shedding more light on the loyalist side of the conflict?
[close]



Don't worry about it.

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Deputy Wendell

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3483 on: February 17, 2021, 10:41:04 AM »
this thread is great, big thanks for linking z library.
currently reading and enjoying this one-


can't believe someone brought J.B.Jackson into this thread--i love it and it's great to see, and Discovering the Vernacular Landscape is one of my favorites.

honestly, throughout my graduate work and beyond, he's probably been more influential on me than anybody else (other than maybe David Harvey)--i consider myself to be an urban/suburban historian, i just approach it through a cultural lens, and he's definitely been an inspiration.

by the way, as i understand it, these folks were pretty tight with Jackson, and i've seen their seminal Learning From Las Vegas described as being a "version of JB Jackson's modern anthropology through the lens of ego-driven architects"


nicotinewheel

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3484 on: February 17, 2021, 11:16:31 AM »
can't believe someone brought J.B.Jackson into this thread--i love it and it's great to see, and Discovering the Vernacular Landscape is one of my favorites.

honestly, throughout my graduate work and beyond, he's probably been more influential on me than anybody else (other than maybe David Harvey)--i consider myself to be an urban/suburban historian, i just approach it through a cultural lens, and he's definitely been an inspiration.

by the way, as i understand it, these folks were pretty tight with Jackson, and i've seen their seminal Learning From Las Vegas described as being a "version of JB Jackson's modern anthropology through the lens of ego-driven architects"
Honestly was a random thrift store find for me, I'm always on the lookout for university press stuff, frequently interesting if outside my normal range of reading.

I've really enjoyed the first couple chapters establishing his usage of 'landscape' and 'vernacular' in-depth, but in a easily understood/digestible way.

Appreciate the recommendation on Leaving Las Vegas, I love to go on mini deep dives with new subjects and I anticipate this book getting me warmed up for more.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3485 on: February 18, 2021, 01:27:10 PM »
Started reading The Discomfort of Evening. I’m only about 30 pages into it but it’s brutal. It starts off with the death of the narrator’s brother and focuses on it in a very impactful way.


ChronicBluntSlider

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3486 on: February 19, 2021, 07:03:14 AM »
^I read that a few months ago. I had preordered it from the local bookstore after hearing the author had become the youngest to win the Booker Prize for it.

The language/mood is pretty breathtaking throughout. I feel like I’m spacing on the literary term for it, but I remember being really taken by the visual analogies. The character lives on a Dutch dairy farm, and they’re always comparing these mundane objects around the farm to like violent and sexual imagery. Very haunting read.

Deputy Wendell

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3487 on: March 06, 2021, 09:40:16 AM »
“...While I was in Chicago last summer, the Honourable Elijah Muhammad invited me to have dinner at his home. This is a stately mansion on Chicago's South Side, and it is the headquarters of the Nation of Islam movement. I had not gone to Chicago to meet Elijah Muhammad--he was not in my thoughts at all--but the moment I received the invitation, it occurred to me that I ought to have expected it. In a way, I owe the invitation to the incredible, abysmal, and really cowardly obtuseness of white liberals. Whether in private debate or in public, any attempt I made to explain how the Black Muslim movement came about, and how it has achieved such force, was met with a blankness that revealed the little connection that the liberals' attitudes have with their perceptions of their lives, or even their knowledge--revealed, in fact, that they could deal with the Negro as a symbol or a victim but had no sense of him as a man...Therefore, late on a hot Sunday afternoon, I presented myself at his door.

I was frightened, because I had, in effect, been summoned into a royal presence. I was frightened for another reason, too. I knew the tension in me between love and power, between pain and rage, and the curious, the grinding way I remained extended between these poles--perpetually attempting to choose the better rather than the worse. But this choice was a choice in terms of a personal, a private better (I was, after all, a writer); what was its relevance in terms of a social worse? Here was the South Side--a million in captivity-stretching from this doorstep as far as the eye could see. And they didn't even read; depressed populations don't have the time or energy to spare. The affluent populations, which should have been their help, didn't, as far as could be discovered, read, either--they merely bought books and devoured them, but not in order to learn : in order to learn new attitudes. Also, I knew that once I had entered the house, I couldn't smoke or drink, and I felt guilty about the cigarettes in my pocket, as I had felt years ago when my friend first took me into his church. I was half an hour late, having got lost on the way here, and I felt as deserving of a scolding as a schoolboy...

...I felt that I was back in my father's house--as, indeed, in a way, I was--and I told Elijah that I did not care if white and black people married, and that I had many white friends. I would have no choice, if it came to it, but to perish with them, for (I said to myself, but not to Elijah), ‘I love a few people and they love me and some of them are white, and isn't love more important than colour?’

Elijah looked at me with great kindness and affection, great pity, as though he were reading my heart, and indicated, sceptically, that I might have white friends, or think I did, and they might be trying to be decent--now--but their time was up. It was almost as though he were saying. ‘They had their chance, man, and they goofed!’...

...And I looked again at the young faces around the table, and looked back at Elijah, who was saying that no people in history had ever been respected who had not owned their land. And the table said, ‘Yes, that's right.’ I could not deny the truth of this statement. For everyone else has, is, a nation, with a specific location and a flag--even, these days, the Jew. It is only ‘the so-called American Negro’ who remains trapped, disinherited, and despised, in a nation that has kept him in bondage for nearly four hundred years and is still unable to recognize him as a human being. And the Black Muslims, along with many people who are not Muslims, no longer wish for a recognition so grudging and (should it ever be achieved) so tardy. Again, it cannot be denied that this point of view is abundantly justified by American Negro history. It is galling indeed to have stood so long, hat in hand, waiting for Americans to grow up enough to realize that you do not threaten them. On the other hand, how is the American Negro now to form himself into a separate nation? For this--and not only from the Muslim point of view--would seem to be his only hope of not perishing in the American backwater and being entirely and forever forgotten, as though he had never existed at all and his travail had been for nothing...

... It was time to leave, and we stood in the large living room, saying good night, with everything curiously and heavily unresolved. I could not help feeling that I had failed a test, in their eyes and in my own, or that I had failed to heed a warning. Elijah and I shook hands, and he asked me where I was going. Wherever it was, I would be driven there—'because, when we invite someone here,’ he said, ‘we take the responsibility of protecting him from the white devils until he gets wherever it is he's going.' I was, in fact, going to have a drink with several white devils on the other side of town. I confess that for a fraction of a second I hesitated to give the address--the kind of address that in Chicago, as in all American cities, identified itself as a white address by virtue of its location. But I did give it, and Elijah and I walked out onto the steps, and one of the young men vanished to get the car. It was very strange to stand with Elijah for those few moments, facing those vivid, violent, so problematical streets. I felt very close to him, and really wished to be able to love and honour him as a witness, an ally, and a father. I felt that I knew something of his pain and his fury, and, yes, even his beauty. Yet precisely because of the reality and the nature of those streets--because of what he conceived as his responsibility and what I took to be mine--we would always be strangers, and possibly, one day, enemies. The car arrived--a gleaming, metallic, grossly American blue--and Elijah and I shook hands and said good night once more. He walked into his mansion and shut the door...”