Author Topic: books to read  (Read 395778 times)

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Coastal Fever

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3600 on: January 08, 2022, 10:40:02 AM »
Just finished Brave New World for the first time.  Really impressive that he could write that in the early 1930ís, and how accurately his predictions seems to be unfolding.. but god damn things didnít really pick up much until the end did they?

I just picked up reading again after deleting all my social media.  Maybe BNW wasnít the best choice to start with.  I also read Ten Arguments For Deleting Your Social Media by Jaron Lanier.  Definitely an eye opener about how profoundly itís fucking up society, but lacked the positivity I was hoping for in regards to the benefits of quitting.  The authorís a Silicon Valley guy/writer, but captivating prose isnít his strong suit, was a bit of a struggle to get through.

tuesday

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3601 on: January 08, 2022, 11:47:30 AM »

SneakySecrets

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3602 on: January 08, 2022, 12:39:45 PM »
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Anyone got some good recommends for books on medieval history?
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I haven't read any yet, but I plan on diving into some Dan Jones after this coming semester.

Iíll look into it, thanks homie.
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MichaelJacksonsGhost

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3603 on: January 08, 2022, 05:21:46 PM »
Just finished Brave New World for the first time.  Really impressive that he could write that in the early 1930ís, and how accurately his predictions seems to be unfolding.. but god damn things didnít really pick up much until the end did they?

I just picked up reading again after deleting all my social media.  Maybe BNW wasnít the best choice to start with.  I also read Ten Arguments For Deleting Your Social Media by Jaron Lanier.  Definitely an eye opener about how profoundly itís fucking up society, but lacked the positivity I was hoping for in regards to the benefits of quitting.  The authorís a Silicon Valley guy/writer, but captivating prose isnít his strong suit, was a bit of a struggle to get through.

Brave New World Revisited might be worth checking out. Huxley wrote it maybe 20 years after brave new worldóitís essentially 100 pages of him saying, ďlook how right I was.Ē Itís been a while since I read it, but I remember it being at least a little interesting.

A buddy recently gave me a copy of Roland Barthes empire of signs. I was a little wary to get into it, having only dabbled in Derrida and Foucault, other post-structuralists, both of whom I found pretty damn hard to crack open. But this Barthes book was fun. He touches on a lot of ideas about language and meaning (or the absence of meaning), but ties them into pretty interesting observations about Japan, their food, entertainment etc. in a way that ensures the philosophy is never too daunting. it reads mostly like a heady travelogue, with a handful of seriously poetic lines.



MichaelJacksonsGhost

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3604 on: January 08, 2022, 05:28:26 PM »
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Currently reading, "The Bandini Quartet."  I'ts Fante's four Bandini books put in to one 700 page monstor.  Very good.
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I'm going through the Quartet as well (individually). Mostly because of Bukowski always quoting him as the author that inspired him. I do enjoy these post-depression American era books. Does anyone have any other authors of a similar nature?
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Different in tone than Fante, but I'd recommend Nathanael West's Miss Lonelyhearts and Day of the Locust, both of which are set in LA around the depression era. Really, really good.

Also, Steinbeck, of course (who I mentioned above). I'm a low-key evangelist for Cannery Row, which is "set during the Great Depression in Monterey, California, on a street lined with sardine canneries that is known as Cannery Row. The story revolves around the people living there: Lee Chong, the local grocer; Doc, a marine biologist; and Mack, the leader of a group of derelict people" (Wiki). It's a charming, sad, and beautiful book.

Not necessarily related to the depression, but Raymond Carverís stories have a similar style to bukowski and Fante. Iíd also seriously recommend Carson McCullerís The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. Really just an astounding cast of characters. Bukowski talks about her a lot, too. Heís got a poem about her alcoholism, IIRC.

Also, Iron Weed by William Kennedy for a straightforward depiction of a bum wino at the turn of the 19th century.

Iíll add Denis Johnson, Flannery OíConnor, and Murakami to the list of Fante/Bukowski like writers. Murakami might seem strange, but every one of his books Iíve read Iíve thought to myself, this is like a Japanese bukowski.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2022, 06:03:19 PM by MichaelJacksonsGhost »

Jagr

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3605 on: January 08, 2022, 06:28:48 PM »
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Currently reading, "The Bandini Quartet."  I'ts Fante's four Bandini books put in to one 700 page monstor.  Very good.
[close]

I'm going through the Quartet as well (individually). Mostly because of Bukowski always quoting him as the author that inspired him. I do enjoy these post-depression American era books. Does anyone have any other authors of a similar nature?
[close]

Different in tone than Fante, but I'd recommend Nathanael West's Miss Lonelyhearts and Day of the Locust, both of which are set in LA around the depression era. Really, really good.

Also, Steinbeck, of course (who I mentioned above). I'm a low-key evangelist for Cannery Row, which is "set during the Great Depression in Monterey, California, on a street lined with sardine canneries that is known as Cannery Row. The story revolves around the people living there: Lee Chong, the local grocer; Doc, a marine biologist; and Mack, the leader of a group of derelict people" (Wiki). It's a charming, sad, and beautiful book.
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Not necessarily related to the depression, but Raymond Carverís stories have a similar style to bukowski and Fante. Iíd also seriously recommend Carson McCullerís The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. Really just an astounding cast of characters. Bukowski talks about her a lot, too. Heís got a poem about her alcoholism, IIRC.

Also, Iron Weed by William Kennedy for a straightforward depiction of a bum wino at the turn of the 19th century.

Iíll add Denis Johnson, Flannery OíConnor, and Murakami to the list of Fante/Bukowski like writers. Murakami might seem strange, but every one of his books Iíve read Iíve thought to myself, this is like a Japanese bukowski.

Carson McCullers is one of my favorite writers. And I agree The Heart is a Lonely Hunter is a wonderful book. Seemed like an amazing woman as well.

Clone1984

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3606 on: January 08, 2022, 08:42:49 PM »
Brave New World was awesome.

I just read Slaughterhouse-Five for the first time in english class. I'd recommend it to anyone especially if they are in some sort of recovery. Though it has its tedium I really in the end am grateful to have read it.

RoaryMcTwang

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3607 on: January 08, 2022, 10:24:20 PM »
People talk about Bukowski nonstop here so now Iím curious. What would be a good place to start with him? Cheers

Frank Sobotka

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3608 on: January 09, 2022, 11:37:26 AM »
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Currently reading, "The Bandini Quartet."  I'ts Fante's four Bandini books put in to one 700 page monstor.  Very good.
[close]

I'm going through the Quartet as well (individually). Mostly because of Bukowski always quoting him as the author that inspired him. I do enjoy these post-depression American era books. Does anyone have any other authors of a similar nature?
[close]

Different in tone than Fante, but I'd recommend Nathanael West's Miss Lonelyhearts and Day of the Locust, both of which are set in LA around the depression era. Really, really good.

Also, Steinbeck, of course (who I mentioned above). I'm a low-key evangelist for Cannery Row, which is "set during the Great Depression in Monterey, California, on a street lined with sardine canneries that is known as Cannery Row. The story revolves around the people living there: Lee Chong, the local grocer; Doc, a marine biologist; and Mack, the leader of a group of derelict people" (Wiki). It's a charming, sad, and beautiful book.

Currently reading The Grapes of Wrath, not very far into it but I can already tell it's going to be emotive (I get attached to characters in a book far more than films & TV).

I do want to get around to Cannery Row, though. I've got a couple of other novels in my to-read pile for now, mind (Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandell, and Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead).

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3609 on: January 09, 2022, 12:16:15 PM »
People talk about Bukowski nonstop here so now Iím curious. What would be a good place to start with him? Cheers

I went through a big Bukowski phase in my early 20s (which is probably pretty typical), and based on that distant memory I'd say that Post Office or Ham on Rye would be the best ones to start with. Maybe Women if you're feeling saucy.

*Edit: the aforementioned are novels; if you want to read his poetry, you might as well start anywhere, imo.

** Edit 2: I got an anthology with a bunch of Borges essays, and they are too good. Borges was a treasure.

Coastal Fever

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3610 on: January 09, 2022, 01:21:59 PM »
Currently reading The Grapes of Wrath, not very far into it but I can already tell it's going to be emotive (I get attached to characters in a book far more than films & TV).

Probably the best, most emotionally gripping book Iíve read.  The Winter Of Our Discontent was also great, and I just bought a copy of In Dubious Battle which I look forward to starting.  Iíve seen people say that East Of Eden is even better than Grapes Of Wrath so I need to track that one down as well.

Grabbed a copy of Jack Londonís Call of The Wild + White Fang, and just finished Call Of The Wild in a couple days, it was only 80 pages though.  Iím just hooked on dusty old hardcovers for some reason.

RoaryMcTwang

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3611 on: January 10, 2022, 01:05:14 AM »
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People talk about Bukowski nonstop here so now Iím curious. What would be a good place to start with him? Cheers
[close]

I went through a big Bukowski phase in my early 20s (which is probably pretty typical), and based on that distant memory I'd say that Post Office or Ham on Rye would be the best ones to start with. Maybe Women if you're feeling saucy.

*Edit: the aforementioned are novels; if you want to read his poetry, you might as well start anywhere, imo.

** Edit 2: I got an anthology with a bunch of Borges essays, and they are too good. Borges was a treasure.

Thanks! I think Bukowski is one of these authors who is absolutely massive in the US but hasn't really got much credit abroad (or maybe I've just had a rather sheltered childhood/youth). I've had a big Henry Miller  phase a few years back  (they seem to be vaguely similar in terms of notoriety?), but Bukowksi has sort of passed me by til now. Will look at these two novels first, I generally prefer prose to poetry.

MichaelJacksonsGhost

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3612 on: January 10, 2022, 05:48:53 AM »
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People talk about Bukowski nonstop here so now Iím curious. What would be a good place to start with him? Cheers
[close]

I went through a big Bukowski phase in my early 20s (which is probably pretty typical), and based on that distant memory I'd say that Post Office or Ham on Rye would be the best ones to start with. Maybe Women if you're feeling saucy.

*Edit: the aforementioned are novels; if you want to read his poetry, you might as well start anywhere, imo.

** Edit 2: I got an anthology with a bunch of Borges essays, and they are too good. Borges was a treasure.
[close]

Thanks! I think Bukowski is one of these authors who is absolutely massive in the US but hasn't really got much credit abroad (or maybe I've just had a rather sheltered childhood/youth). I've had a big Henry Miller  phase a few years back  (they seem to be vaguely similar in terms of notoriety?), but Bukowksi has sort of passed me by til now. Will look at these two novels first, I generally prefer prose to poetry.

Iíd recommend Factotum, too. I thought that was the best of his novels. Also the short story collection Hot Water Music is worth checking out. I feel like Bukowski works well in the shorter form.

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3613 on: January 10, 2022, 10:49:24 AM »
Of course, @RoaryMcTwang! I hope you enjoy his work. Bukowski, like Miller, is frank and explicit re: sexuality, but his prose is much simpler, like Hemingway (whom he often cites an as influence).

@MichaelJacksonsGhost makes a great point, too. I totally forgot about Bukowski's short stories, but I think I'd have to agree he's better, or at least more interesting in that format. Most of his novels are loosely autobiographical, and that could get a bit tiring if you don't happen to identify/sympathize with the adventures/exploits of "Henry Chinaski." In the short stories, he's forced to invent characters and put them in intriguing scenarios (this is basically what all short stories do, I guess), and that takes the work into unique territory, if I remember correctly.

newguy

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3614 on: January 11, 2022, 11:11:05 AM »
"Manufacturing Consent" and "Capitalist Realism" are both good. "What is to be done" and  "Mutual Aid" will blow your hair back, hard to beleive these two books were written in the late 19th, early 20th century.

SneakySecrets

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3615 on: January 11, 2022, 11:22:20 AM »
"Manufacturing ConsentĒ

Sounds like my honeymoon!
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