Author Topic: books to read  (Read 372452 times)

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IusedToSkateMore

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3450 on: January 21, 2021, 11:24:48 AM »
I’ve uh, been reading a whole bunch of war books last couple weeks, they’re like crack to me.
Can anyone recommend?

Ones I read already are

Dispatches
Chickenhawk
Lone survivor
Marine corps tank battles
War
Black hawk down
A bright shining lie
Fearless
Seal team six
Matterhorn
We were soldiers once and young
American sniper
Kill anything that moves
Night drop
Seal of honour
Going after cacciato - almost finished and I have bogged down wtf is the whole book like a dream sequence or what? It’s alright though

I am not counting stuff like Vonnegut, Hemingway, Joseph Heller or any of the Russians. They’re great books but I read them already - I’m sorta locked in to more non fiction type stuff right now, but yeah a couple I listed above are fiction

Cheers

Edit

Where are you cunts stealing your books from I usually go to pdfdrive but I’d be interested if there’s other good sites. Many you gotta join, fuck around with all these links and bullshit and it just seems suss
Anyone know any ones like pdfdrive?

b-ok.cc/

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matty_c

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3451 on: January 21, 2021, 12:15:38 PM »
Unreal, thanks mate!
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Re: books to read
« Reply #3452 on: January 21, 2021, 06:09:26 PM »
Expand Quote
I’ve uh, been reading a whole bunch of war books last couple weeks, they’re like crack to me.
Can anyone recommend?

Ones I read already are

Dispatches
Chickenhawk
Lone survivor
Marine corps tank battles
War
Black hawk down
A bright shining lie
Fearless
Seal team six
Matterhorn
We were soldiers once and young
American sniper
Kill anything that moves
Night drop
Seal of honour
Going after cacciato - almost finished and I have bogged down wtf is the whole book like a dream sequence or what? It’s alright though

I am not counting stuff like Vonnegut, Hemingway, Joseph Heller or any of the Russians. They’re great books but I read them already - I’m sorta locked in to more non fiction type stuff right now, but yeah a couple I listed above are fiction

Cheers

Edit

Where are you cunts stealing your books from I usually go to pdfdrive but I’d be interested if there’s other good sites. Many you gotta join, fuck around with all these links and bullshit and it just seems suss
Anyone know any ones like pdfdrive?
[close]

b-ok.cc/

anything you can imagine, no payment needed. z library, boyeee



childhood

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3453 on: January 26, 2021, 02:19:13 PM »
largepdf.com & libgen.is are also both good resources for books/scientific articles/magazines/etc.

Largepdf specifically, I used to download a bunch of graphic novels, early on in quarantine when I was trying to get into that kind of thing.

b-ok.cc / z library is probably the best though. Most user friendly too, I've even gotten my mom into getting books off there for her kindle.


This is an essay, not a book, but since there's so many Cormac McCarthy fans on here, I figured I would post his first ever published non-fiction essay (largely about the development of language in humans) that came out a few years ago. I dunno if everyone has read it already, I only just learned about it a few days ago.
https://nautil.us/issue/47/consciousness/the-kekul-problem
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AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3454 on: February 05, 2021, 12:42:18 PM »
Tolstoy, for sure. The golden age of Russian literature is the cats pajamas.

Yeah, right on. That's exactly what I did. It was great: depressing, bleak, but ultimately great. Exactly what I was looking for. The Russians never disappoint (well, at least not Dostoyevski, Tolstoy or Bulgakow...).

On to Last Evenings on Earth and that book on climate change. I'm on the fence between fiction and non-fiction. Might as well read both at the same time.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3455 on: February 05, 2021, 12:48:12 PM »
Expand Quote
Halfway through Obama's A Promised Land. As said, usually I'm not into politician's memoirs, but in the light of the shitshow of 2021, Obama's quite a refreshing read. As could be expected, it's at times overly dramatic and Hollywood-esque with him shedding tears over letters from parents of fallen soldiers, blablabla... but at its core, it also provides valuable insight into how different institutions and key players in America work in practice. In its best moments, Obama carries you through the conflicting ideas and feelings behind his decisions. Not being from the US myself, this has taught me a lot about certain unwritten rules in US politics that I hadn't been aware of. There's also some interesting behind-the-scenes stuff (probably not always the whole truth, of course).

I also like Obama as a person. Obviously, he's trying really hard to come off as the guy-next-door, but it's also nice to listen to a politician, who doesn't shy away from questioning himself and his motivations in politics and who somewhat believes in the value of modesty. I'm also buying his inner conflict between pragmatism and idealism. Obama never seemed like a power-hungry narcissist to me.

While Obama is being fair to almost all fellow politicians, he also proves that Mitch McConnell is a complete dipshit, and tells you not just between the lines.

That being said, it's about time to get back to my normal reading. Just had these in the mail. Can't decide which one to read first:






[close]

I think reading through Obama's memoir and seeing him continue to try and argue in good faith and work in a bipartisanship manner after the midterms where they got swept by the tea party shows that he was dangerously naive. He should have been more combative and he should have followed Reid's example and pushed aggressively for his agenda instead of meeting in the middle with the frothing psychos who hated him.

Yeah, I concur. Reading his memoir, it feels like Obama is aware of that mistake himself, but he still tries to explain and justify why he wanted to work with Republicans in a bipartisan manner. In all fairness, I'm not sure he saw "birtherism" and other outright crazy, vicious right-wing attacks on him coming, when all he wanted was unify the country and its political institutions. But yeah, definitely naive in hindsight.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3456 on: February 05, 2021, 01:47:52 PM »
Found a bunch of obscure philosophy books on that site so thanks for sharing! I’m still taking forever to get through the Knausgaard essays but am almost done. They’re fine but can get a little meh on their own. They definitely don’t have the same force as My Struggle and reading them all together is doesn’t work as well as reading them separately as they’re published elsewhere.

sometimeperhaps

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3457 on: February 05, 2021, 02:02:25 PM »
I feel like I should give My Struggle another try. I was really hyped when I got it, and I love the idea of the book. But when I started reading it, I almost found it to descriptive. And I think I recall stopping at a point that was leading up to a negative event, and you could tell something bad was going to happen, but you knew you still had 10 pages to go and it made me anxious or something. But maybe that’s a good thing.

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3458 on: February 05, 2021, 06:56:40 PM »
I loved the series but I cannot recommend them to anyone because I honestly have no idea how to tell whether someone else would like them or not. The massive details and drawn out emotional context are definitely one of the major themes and drivers of the series but if you don't care for how he does those, you won't like the series. I feel like you can tell pretty quickly within Book 1 (maybe 100 - 200 pages in?) whether or not the series is for you because it does not vary from that style and vibe for the remaining books.

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3459 on: February 06, 2021, 02:45:58 AM »
Found a bunch of obscure philosophy books on that site so thanks for sharing! I’m still taking forever to get through the Knausgaard essays but am almost done. They’re fine but can get a little meh on their own. They definitely don’t have the same force as My Struggle and reading them all together is doesn’t work as well as reading them separately as they’re published elsewhere.

Which essay collection are you reading? In the Land of the Cyclops?

I must say that - despite loving books 1 to 5 of My Struggle - I was a little put off by book 6. Never finished it to be honest and at this point, I'm not sure I ever will. It's not that I don't like a demanding analysis every once in a while, but I had no idea where exactly he was going with that Celan poem. I think what was really bothering me was the contrast to the emotional depth and style of previous books. Even though I might have missed something, it seems to me like Knausgaard is out of his element when he writes complex literary analyses. I'm not saying that he doesn't know what he's talking about - he obviously does - but I think he can't convey his points the same way he can when he talks about real life events. What did you think about book 6?

That being said, I feel some of his best writing is in this underrated gem of a a book. To me, it's up there with Fever Pitch as one of the best books about football ever. Hands down. Strong recommendation if you're into football.


Skibb

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3460 on: February 06, 2021, 02:26:28 PM »

b-ok.cc/

anything you can imagine, no payment needed. z library, boyeee

Duuuu-huuu-de!!

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3461 on: February 06, 2021, 04:40:02 PM »
Expand Quote
Found a bunch of obscure philosophy books on that site so thanks for sharing! I’m still taking forever to get through the Knausgaard essays but am almost done. They’re fine but can get a little meh on their own. They definitely don’t have the same force as My Struggle and reading them all together is doesn’t work as well as reading them separately as they’re published elsewhere.
[close]

Which essay collection are you reading? In the Land of the Cyclops?

I must say that - despite loving books 1 to 5 of My Struggle - I was a little put off by book 6. Never finished it to be honest and at this point, I'm not sure I ever will. It's not that I don't like a demanding analysis every once in a while, but I had no idea where exactly he was going with that Celan poem. I think what was really bothering me was the contrast to the emotional depth and style of previous books. Even though I might have missed something, it seems to me like Knausgaard is out of his element when he writes complex literary analyses. I'm not saying that he doesn't know what he's talking about - he obviously does - but I think he can't convey his points the same way he can when he talks about real life events. What did you think about book 6?

That being said, I feel some of his best writing is in this underrated gem of a a book. To me, it's up there with Fever Pitch as one of the best books about football ever. Hands down. Strong recommendation if you're into football.


Yep - In the Land of the Cyclops

I agree with you completely about Knausgaard. I definitely like his personal essay, recounting his life versus his criticism voice. Those parts of My Struggle were definitely my least favorite unless he directly tied it to his inner experiences. Book 6 suffered because of that, especially the middle third about Hitler (and Breivik to a much lesser extent). I understand what he was doing but the best parts of that section were the brief times he put his life in the fore and described how it personally impacted him. I will say that the last third is MUCH better. It's more in line with the other 5 books and I liked the first third (also save for the Celan analysis). It was altogether an uneven end to the series but does make sense as a whole and the last third makes up for it and is a satisfying conclusion.

Urtripping

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3462 on: February 06, 2021, 04:46:33 PM »
I read George Saunders' Tenth of December book of short stories in college and really loved it, I'm a sucker for bleak shit. Also, something about the short story collection format is really attractive to me. Reminds me of when my parents would read Stephen King's collections to spook us out around the campfire or on Halloween.

I wanna give Pastoralia a shot. Anybody else fuck with a short story?
Cuban_Lynx broke the record for both most blocked shots and most technical fouls in a single season for Wisconsin Boy's Varsity Basketball in 2002.


botefdunn

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3463 on: February 06, 2021, 05:15:34 PM »
Anybody else fuck with a short story?

I do. Mavis Gallant and Paul Bowles are my champions in this regard, and also my favourite writers, probably not a coincidence.

MarxLenin

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3464 on: February 06, 2021, 07:54:43 PM »
Mother by Maxim Gorky

AnotherHardDayAtTheOffice

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3465 on: February 07, 2021, 02:27:23 PM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Found a bunch of obscure philosophy books on that site so thanks for sharing! I’m still taking forever to get through the Knausgaard essays but am almost done. They’re fine but can get a little meh on their own. They definitely don’t have the same force as My Struggle and reading them all together is doesn’t work as well as reading them separately as they’re published elsewhere.
[close]

Which essay collection are you reading? In the Land of the Cyclops?

I must say that - despite loving books 1 to 5 of My Struggle - I was a little put off by book 6. Never finished it to be honest and at this point, I'm not sure I ever will. It's not that I don't like a demanding analysis every once in a while, but I had no idea where exactly he was going with that Celan poem. I think what was really bothering me was the contrast to the emotional depth and style of previous books. Even though I might have missed something, it seems to me like Knausgaard is out of his element when he writes complex literary analyses. I'm not saying that he doesn't know what he's talking about - he obviously does - but I think he can't convey his points the same way he can when he talks about real life events. What did you think about book 6?

That being said, I feel some of his best writing is in this underrated gem of a a book. To me, it's up there with Fever Pitch as one of the best books about football ever. Hands down. Strong recommendation if you're into football.

[close]

Yep - In the Land of the Cyclops

I agree with you completely about Knausgaard. I definitely like his personal essay, recounting his life versus his criticism voice. Those parts of My Struggle were definitely my least favorite unless he directly tied it to his inner experiences. Book 6 suffered because of that, especially the middle third about Hitler (and Breivik to a much lesser extent). I understand what he was doing but the best parts of that section were the brief times he put his life in the fore and described how it personally impacted him. I will say that the last third is MUCH better. It's more in line with the other 5 books and I liked the first third (also save for the Celan analysis). It was altogether an uneven end to the series but does make sense as a whole and the last third makes up for it and is a satisfying conclusion.

Yeah, I that makes sense. I actually liked the first third - about his dad's cousin who objects against his books and their portrayal of his father - and in general enjoyed reading about the process of writing and publishing the first book - up until the point where he starts discussing the Celan poem.

I haven't heard anything good about the Hitler essay, but for some odd reason, I still feel like I could be interested in that part. What specifically put you off?

You actually made me consider giving the book another try. The question is whether I should just skip the Celan part or start over. But yeah, now I'm totally looking forward to the last third. Thanks, man!

oyolar

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3466 on: February 07, 2021, 08:21:13 PM »
It was fine, but it devolved into such a biographical and historical analysis that it became a slog. I think that it's obviously important to address the shared title and to set up the contrast between the base and unremarkable Hitler and the sublime Celan (If he is going to include Celan which...eh?). And in the Hitler essay, we see the dark mirror of what can happen to failed artistic ambition in a world reeling from upheaval and what it means to be isolated. This review: https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/the-form-of-the-small-life-karl-ove-knausgaards-my-struggle-book-six/ does a good job of describing the point of section 2 at its best. The problem is that "at its best" is maybe a third or 40% of the entire section? The rest is just overly thorough details of Hitler's life that could have been greatly condensed without losing context. And by not condensing them, we just get bogged down by these details so we lose the emotional immediacy that's the point of that biographical turn.

Sluggloaph

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3467 on: February 08, 2021, 07:18:03 AM »
I read George Saunders' Tenth of December book of short stories in college and really loved it, I'm a sucker for bleak shit. Also, something about the short story collection format is really attractive to me. Reminds me of when my parents would read Stephen King's collections to spook us out around the campfire or on Halloween.

I wanna give Pastoralia a shot. Anybody else fuck with a short story?
Anton chekov. His short stories are perfect. Pushkin has some shorts too.
I pretty much just plug russian lit on this jawn.
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goeatsomefriedbread

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3468 on: February 08, 2021, 08:23:01 AM »
I recently finished "The Hard Life" by Flann O Brian (Brian O'Nolan), it's a really bizarre yet captivating novella set in Ireland at the turn of the century (1900). It charts the adolescense of a young man in Dublin, and his brother and father, I wouldn't want to ruin the plot, it's odd and is riddled with criticism of the Irish education system, the Catholic Church. I picked up another of his books called "The Third Policeman", released posthumously (I think they found the book in his house after he'd died and got it published). Apparently he used to write in to the local newspaper pretending to be two different people, argueing with himself about different topics in the public opinions section, but they only figured out it was him after he died and they checked his house. I would definitely recommend The Hard Life if you enjoy odd fiction, it's told really well, I think you can find most of his work online for fairly cheap.

edit - RE the Russian literature posts, I read Crime and Punishment a number of years ago and loved it, I tried reading The Karamazov Brothers (sp?) but couldn't get through it. Not Russian but I also tried reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep - Phillip K Dick, but struggled again. Maybe soon I'll be able to get through it, my attention span and ability to concentrate is awful! But reading books definitely helps me rebuild it somewhat
« Last Edit: February 08, 2021, 08:34:26 AM by goeatsomefriedbread »

fredgallSOTY

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3469 on: February 08, 2021, 08:40:12 AM »
Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fanon is a classic and a fantastic work of art

Frank and Fred

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3470 on: February 08, 2021, 09:03:10 AM »


I read a lot of post-war American Lit in university but this never came across my radar until now. Picked it up to honor Black History Month and so far its a stunning read.

Deputy Wendell

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3471 on: February 08, 2021, 09:26:31 AM »
Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fanon is a classic and a fantastic work of art

yes...absolutely...and indispensable...and this passage comes to mind a lot these days when i look at all of the nominal "liberals" who plague what passes for "the left" in this country right now:

"The unpreparedness of the educated classes, the lack of practical links between them and the mass of the people, their laziness, and, let it be said, their cowardice at the decisive moment of the struggle will give rise to tragic mishaps."

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3472 on: February 08, 2021, 12:53:18 PM »
I recently finished "The Hard Life" by Flann O Brian (Brian O'Nolan), it's a really bizarre yet captivating novella set in Ireland at the turn of the century (1900). It charts the adolescense of a young man in Dublin, and his brother and father, I wouldn't want to ruin the plot, it's odd and is riddled with criticism of the Irish education system, the Catholic Church. I picked up another of his books called "The Third Policeman", released posthumously (I think they found the book in his house after he'd died and got it published). Apparently he used to write in to the local newspaper pretending to be two different people, argueing with himself about different topics in the public opinions section, but they only figured out it was him after he died and they checked his house. I would definitely recommend The Hard Life if you enjoy odd fiction, it's told really well, I think you can find most of his work online for fairly cheap.

I have probably never laughed out loud as hard or as many times while reading a book as I did with The Hard Life. I've probably posted something about The Third Policeman more than once in this thread, too. Has to be in my top 3 for novels. I can't recommend O'Brien's stuff enough.

Peter Zagreus

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3473 on: February 08, 2021, 12:54:02 PM »


I read a lot of post-war American Lit in university but this never came across my radar until now. Picked it up to honor Black History Month and so far its a stunning read.

Also, going to have to put this on the ol list. Good looking out!

Nosferatu

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3474 on: February 08, 2021, 03:24:17 PM »
That William Melvin Kelley book looks awesome. Always judge a book by its cover.

I finished this recently. It's written in script format as it is about asian-americans in television/media so it is a quick read but quite good. Hence the Naitonal Book Award I guess...

I thought it wasnt just him solo, shouldve stuck with my og thought.
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MichaelJacksonsGhost

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3475 on: February 11, 2021, 06:29:13 AM »
Just finished the first part of Remembrance of Things Past. I definitely see why it’s so well regarded (the sentences are absolutely mad, but read so well, and the way the story tracks the narrator’s memories is unbelievable in its scope), but man do I not care one lick about French aristocracy ca. 1875. I have to will myself to read 10-15 pages before I get bogged down and have to leave the book for a little while. I’d stop reading it altogether except for the fact that occasionally the story will really open up for 10 pages or so, and those moments are some of the most refreshing and touching I’ve seen in a book and make the rest of it totally worth it.

JLay24

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3476 on: February 15, 2021, 06:15:05 PM »
Recently finished Pachinko. Anyone else read it? I thought it was wonderful and well written.

Also, anybody know where or how to download audiobooks ala Z-Library?

botefdunn

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3477 on: February 16, 2021, 04:07:39 PM »
I just discovered CLR James and am reading this right now. I don't know a damn thing about cricket but am enjoying the book thoroughly. I find it very comforting/engrossing.




Easy Slider

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3478 on: February 17, 2021, 02:43:41 AM »


dont know if anyones mentioned this, but this book is fucking incredible. and its true. read it. i started reading it a second time as soon as i finished.

Got that one based on this recommendation, so thanks. Is there anything comparable but shedding more light on the loyalist side of the conflict?

DaleSr

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Re: books to read
« Reply #3479 on: February 17, 2021, 08:27:15 AM »


dont know if anyones mentioned this, but this book is fucking incredible. and its true. read it. i started reading it a second time as soon as i finished.

I need to finish this
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