Author Topic: Japan  (Read 4816 times)

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ChuckRamone

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Re: Japan
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2020, 07:09:24 AM »
For Pals living in Japan, what's life there like these days? I've lived there before as an exchange student and once on a spouse visa. After my recent trip to Tokyo it made me consider living there again. However, I'm 40 now and the last time I lived there I couldn't find a permanent job, but that was during the 2008 recession and I also had less professional experience back then, so maybe it would be a little different this time.

habby

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Re: Japan
« Reply #31 on: February 19, 2020, 02:42:45 PM »
I enjoy it. don't live in Tokyo but close enough to go whenever I want. I won't be here forever but I do enjoy my time here skating, surfing, hiking, traveling etc. but as far as jobs go - there doesn't seem to be a shortage but it just depends on your level of Japanese, skill set/experience, and where you live. If you live in a bigger city like Tokyo or Osaka you could find a job outside of teaching if you meet the criteria for sure. feel free to pm if you want

Pango

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Re: Japan
« Reply #32 on: February 19, 2020, 06:29:12 PM »
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Oh I've been to High Sox too, just couldn't remember the name. Also a cool place indeed, seemed more popular amongst skatepark skaters too, funnily enough. It's more central so I guess the demographic is different, which explains the variation in vibes. I know Hagi-san was nice to me every time. As far as the Laboratory, it's good for curiosities and specific product.

Speaking of skateparks, Yokosuka's Umikaze is worth a visit and there you'll also find Ours Skateshop close by: https://www.instagram.com/oursskateco/
[close]

Have you ever been to any parks in Tokyo? Iíve been wanting to go to one ever since I got back into skating, but they are all 50 minutes away and I donít have much free time so I want to make it count when I go to one. Most guys I talk to say they go to an indoor place in near Akabane but I much prefer free outdoor parks

Also agree with your assessment of high Sox, Ikebukuro is a major hub so it makes sense the demographic is a bit more open.

OMG I didn't know the name of this park and was going there everyday when I was in Yokosuka for a month.  Great vibe, really nice people and next to a market too.  Loved Yokosuka!  Nostalgia is kicking in!

dakara

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Re: Japan
« Reply #33 on: February 21, 2020, 07:59:44 PM »
For Pals living in Japan, what's life there like these days? I've lived there before as an exchange student and once on a spouse visa. After my recent trip to Tokyo it made me consider living there again. However, I'm 40 now and the last time I lived there I couldn't find a permanent job, but that was during the 2008 recession and I also had less professional experience back then, so maybe it would be a little different this time.

There is a huge labor shortage, if you are Japanese you can find a job in a day no problem. Businesses are absolutely desperate for workers.

For foreigners, it is also easy to find a job if you can get your visa situation sorted. This heavily depends on what country you are a citizen of but assuming youíre America, having a college degree is basically mandatory to get that work visa if you arenít a student visa.  Easiest way is the classic English teacher route, almost any idiot with a worthless degree can get this job but it sucks, employers are very controlling, and itís a dead end job. If you have a degree and a skill/experience in IT, programming, corporate sales, finance, marketing you will find a decent job easily especially if you have a bit of Japanese language ability. Even if you just have some random degree, some Japanese language ability plus professional experience in a dead end office job you should be able to find something better than English teaching

I like living here,  but Iím a Japanese citizen and speak the language fluently. I think most foreigners can live here pretty easily, but I donít really recommend it long term because IMO itís impossible to really ďgetĒ Japanese people and culture unless you are raised Japanese and hav been speaking the language since childhood. Even foreigners with extremely good Japanese Iíve met never truly fit in, it just isnít possible. Youíll always be an alien in an foreign land.

habby

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Re: Japan
« Reply #34 on: February 21, 2020, 08:08:22 PM »
checking komozawa today and maybe yume farm in China tomorrow. Anyone been to yume?

whatsreallygood

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Re: Japan
« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2020, 11:58:41 PM »
Out of curiosity would you know how the job market is in the STEM/Medical field? I'm always curious how it'd compare to the west. My Japanese buddy said he'd never work in Japan since the work environment is terrible (unpaid overtime, strong hierarchies, etc.) but in fairness the last time he worked in Japan was more than 5 years ago. Everyone says to never teach English though, since no one will take you seriously, the pay is shit and you can't tell girls what you do for work or they'll make fun of you.

dakara

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Re: Japan
« Reply #36 on: February 22, 2020, 12:48:59 AM »
Out of curiosity would you know how the job market is in the STEM/Medical field? I'm always curious how it'd compare to the west. My Japanese buddy said he'd never work in Japan since the work environment is terrible (unpaid overtime, strong hierarchies, etc.) but in fairness the last time he worked in Japan was more than 5 years ago. Everyone says to never teach English though, since no one will take you seriously, the pay is shit and you can't tell girls what you do for work or they'll make fun of you.

No idea tbh about stem and medical. I have a few friends that are nurses and it seems like the hours are a lot less hectic than the US because most hospitals here arenít open 24/7.

I think the work culture thing is way overblown. Iíve worked  tons of jobs of all sorts in both japan and the US, from train platform construction and house painting to hotels to office jobs and everything in between. The hours if you are a salaryman honestly arenít any different from a US office worker unless you are a middle manager, then the hours are indeed insane here. All other jobs Iíve had here have been no worse and sometimes better, they paid for my nationalized healthcare and overtime, work 40-50 hours a week, workload not too bad. The hierarchy thing is real, but I actually prefer it over how ambiguous and casual US workplaces are. A lot less drama and bullshit when there are set ways to properly interact and a clear image of where you are in the company. Nowadays there are so many different types of jobs and companies that it really doesnít matter. Most Japanese people will overblow the work culture thing to keep conversations with westerners flowing easily because itís a common topic of conversation left over from the 80-90s when the work environment was all more ubiquitous. And tbh most Japanese that move and work elsewhere and trash the work culture etc are the type that kind of have that country self hate complex, like the girl you went to high school with who spent a semester in Europe and after that wonít talk about anything else besides how America is so shit compared to Spain or whatever.


Thereís a good reason English teaching is looked down upon. It usually attracts a ton of weirdos and losers from America and Britain. No offense to any English teachers on here as there are obviously exceptions, but even non kook English teachers will usually tell you the same thing. If I bump into a westerner at a bar or something and he starts chatting me up cause he finds out Iím fluent in English, I usually ask what they do for work very quickly and if they say English teacher I avoid/ignore after that. Although I can usually tell initially. Kinda harsh but you meet so many people when you live in a city like this that Iím not willing to waste my time conversing or getting to know someone I know is likely to be another dipshit English teacher.

Jive Turkey

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Re: Japan
« Reply #37 on: February 24, 2020, 06:30:15 PM »
checking komozawa today and maybe yume farm in China tomorrow. Anyone been to yume?
I've been wanting to hit up yume farm for some years now but it's just so far out in the sticks.
If you go, please post up here.


Thereís a good reason English teaching is looked down upon. It usually attracts a ton of weirdos and losers from America and Britain. No offense to any English teachers on here as there are obviously exceptions, but even non kook English teachers will usually tell you the same thing. If I bump into a westerner at a bar or something and he starts chatting me up cause he finds out Iím fluent in English, I usually ask what they do for work very quickly and if they say English teacher I avoid/ignore after that. Although I can usually tell initially. Kinda harsh but you meet so many people when you live in a city like this that Iím not willing to waste my time conversing or getting to know someone I know is likely to be another dipshit English teacher.
The truth.
The majority of westerners I meet are weebs. I ain't got time for that.

dakara

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Re: Japan
« Reply #38 on: February 24, 2020, 08:13:11 PM »
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checking komozawa today and maybe yume farm in China tomorrow. Anyone been to yume?
[close]
I've been wanting to hit up yume farm for some years now but it's just so far out in the sticks.
If you go, please post up here.


Expand Quote
Thereís a good reason English teaching is looked down upon. It usually attracts a ton of weirdos and losers from America and Britain. No offense to any English teachers on here as there are obviously exceptions, but even non kook English teachers will usually tell you the same thing. If I bump into a westerner at a bar or something and he starts chatting me up cause he finds out Iím fluent in English, I usually ask what they do for work very quickly and if they say English teacher I avoid/ignore after that. Although I can usually tell initially. Kinda harsh but you meet so many people when you live in a city like this that Iím not willing to waste my time conversing or getting to know someone I know is likely to be another dipshit English teacher.
[close]
The truth.
The majority of westerners I meet are weebs. I ain't got time for that.

I actually donít meet that many weebs and the ones I do are usually cringeWorthy but Iím pretty indifferent too. At least they have a reason they wanted to come here.

Most of the English teachers I run into and dislike are below average white dudes with little knowledge of japan who graduated college but donít have the smarts/drive/balls to have gotten a non shit job after graduation. Didnít build up enough of a social circle with close friends to make them reconsider moving halfway around the world to a place weíre they know no one and canít converse with anyone. And generally have nothing going for them in life because they are not so dumb or socially awkward to be a freak but too dumb and/or socially awkward to actually make a life for themselves. Itís always that one dude you went to high school with who on paper is your average white guy, but has never made a close group of friends, has no apperent hobbies or cool shit that heís really into besides maybe video games, never had a gf, and worked as a low level manager at the place he worked part time during college before fucking off to some Asian country. They come here because they have nothing to lose , anyone with any degree can get an English teaching job, high school English teacher in japan sounds cooler to people back home  than assistant manager at Home Depot, and they think Japanese chicks will be throwing themselves at them simply cause theyíre white.

But back to skating. Think Iím finally going to Olympic park on Thursday. Can finally ride a mini ramp for the first time in years.

Jive Turkey

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Re: Japan
« Reply #39 on: February 24, 2020, 09:49:58 PM »

whatsreallygood

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Re: Japan
« Reply #40 on: February 25, 2020, 10:47:50 AM »
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Out of curiosity would you know how the job market is in the STEM/Medical field? I'm always curious how it'd compare to the west. My Japanese buddy said he'd never work in Japan since the work environment is terrible (unpaid overtime, strong hierarchies, etc.) but in fairness the last time he worked in Japan was more than 5 years ago. Everyone says to never teach English though, since no one will take you seriously, the pay is shit and you can't tell girls what you do for work or they'll make fun of you.
[close]

No idea tbh about stem and medical. I have a few friends that are nurses and it seems like the hours are a lot less hectic than the US because most hospitals here arenít open 24/7.

I think the work culture thing is way overblown. Iíve worked  tons of jobs of all sorts in both japan and the US, from train platform construction and house painting to hotels to office jobs and everything in between. The hours if you are a salaryman honestly arenít any different from a US office worker unless you are a middle manager, then the hours are indeed insane here. All other jobs Iíve had here have been no worse and sometimes better, they paid for my nationalized healthcare and overtime, work 40-50 hours a week, workload not too bad. The hierarchy thing is real, but I actually prefer it over how ambiguous and casual US workplaces are. A lot less drama and bullshit when there are set ways to properly interact and a clear image of where you are in the company. Nowadays there are so many different types of jobs and companies that it really doesnít matter. Most Japanese people will overblow the work culture thing to keep conversations with westerners flowing easily because itís a common topic of conversation left over from the 80-90s when the work environment was all more ubiquitous. And tbh most Japanese that move and work elsewhere and trash the work culture etc are the type that kind of have that country self hate complex, like the girl you went to high school with who spent a semester in Europe and after that wonít talk about anything else besides how America is so shit compared to Spain or whatever.


Thereís a good reason English teaching is looked down upon. It usually attracts a ton of weirdos and losers from America and Britain. No offense to any English teachers on here as there are obviously exceptions, but even non kook English teachers will usually tell you the same thing. If I bump into a westerner at a bar or something and he starts chatting me up cause he finds out Iím fluent in English, I usually ask what they do for work very quickly and if they say English teacher I avoid/ignore after that. Although I can usually tell initially. Kinda harsh but you meet so many people when you live in a city like this that Iím not willing to waste my time conversing or getting to know someone I know is likely to be another dipshit English teacher.

Huh interesting note about nurses getting better hours. Makes me wanna look into possibilities (I'm not a nurse but obviously there's other options). Though I imagine not knowing Japanese in that field pretty much makes you unemployable which is understandable. I'm not american so thankfully I don't have to worry about healthcare already which is nice. I'm not surprised people aren't too stoked on English teachers, I imagine it attracts a ton of weebs with yellow fever who think they're gonna swim in pussy lol

ChuckRamone

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Re: Japan
« Reply #41 on: February 25, 2020, 06:44:17 PM »
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For Pals living in Japan, what's life there like these days? I've lived there before as an exchange student and once on a spouse visa. After my recent trip to Tokyo it made me consider living there again. However, I'm 40 now and the last time I lived there I couldn't find a permanent job, but that was during the 2008 recession and I also had less professional experience back then, so maybe it would be a little different this time.
[close]

There is a huge labor shortage, if you are Japanese you can find a job in a day no problem. Businesses are absolutely desperate for workers.

For foreigners, it is also easy to find a job if you can get your visa situation sorted. This heavily depends on what country you are a citizen of but assuming youíre America, having a college degree is basically mandatory to get that work visa if you arenít a student visa.  Easiest way is the classic English teacher route, almost any idiot with a worthless degree can get this job but it sucks, employers are very controlling, and itís a dead end job. If you have a degree and a skill/experience in IT, programming, corporate sales, finance, marketing you will find a decent job easily especially if you have a bit of Japanese language ability. Even if you just have some random degree, some Japanese language ability plus professional experience in a dead end office job you should be able to find something better than English teaching

I like living here,  but Iím a Japanese citizen and speak the language fluently. I think most foreigners can live here pretty easily, but I donít really recommend it long term because IMO itís impossible to really ďgetĒ Japanese people and culture unless you are raised Japanese and hav been speaking the language since childhood. Even foreigners with extremely good Japanese Iíve met never truly fit in, it just isnít possible. Youíll always be an alien in an foreign land.

I feel this way anyway in the US because I'm Asian. It's not as bad these days compared to in the 80s and 90s but growing up here sucked at times, and it left an impression on me. The younger generation of Asian Americans seem to have it a little better. I think you're right though that the feeling of alienation in Japan would be even more severe; they have a strong sense of identity vs. gaijin. I have the N1 now, which I didn't have when I was last there, so my chances of getting a job might be better. I think it would be cool to live there for a decade, visit other parts of Japan and Asia while there, and move back. But my wife who is Japanese told me if we move there again she's not moving back to America. She's tired from all the moving we've done over the years - like once every few years including internationally and within the US. I wouldn't want to be an English teacher there. I would like to proofread or translate if possible.

dakara

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Re: Japan
« Reply #42 on: February 25, 2020, 07:23:52 PM »
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For Pals living in Japan, what's life there like these days? I've lived there before as an exchange student and once on a spouse visa. After my recent trip to Tokyo it made me consider living there again. However, I'm 40 now and the last time I lived there I couldn't find a permanent job, but that was during the 2008 recession and I also had less professional experience back then, so maybe it would be a little different this time.
[close]

There is a huge labor shortage, if you are Japanese you can find a job in a day no problem. Businesses are absolutely desperate for workers.

For foreigners, it is also easy to find a job if you can get your visa situation sorted. This heavily depends on what country you are a citizen of but assuming youíre America, having a college degree is basically mandatory to get that work visa if you arenít a student visa.  Easiest way is the classic English teacher route, almost any idiot with a worthless degree can get this job but it sucks, employers are very controlling, and itís a dead end job. If you have a degree and a skill/experience in IT, programming, corporate sales, finance, marketing you will find a decent job easily especially if you have a bit of Japanese language ability. Even if you just have some random degree, some Japanese language ability plus professional experience in a dead end office job you should be able to find something better than English teaching

I like living here,  but Iím a Japanese citizen and speak the language fluently. I think most foreigners can live here pretty easily, but I donít really recommend it long term because IMO itís impossible to really ďgetĒ Japanese people and culture unless you are raised Japanese and hav been speaking the language since childhood. Even foreigners with extremely good Japanese Iíve met never truly fit in, it just isnít possible. Youíll always be an alien in an foreign land.
[close]

I feel this way anyway in the US because I'm Asian. It's not as bad these days compared to in the 80s and 90s but growing up here sucked at times, and it left an impression on me. The younger generation of Asian Americans seem to have it a little better. I think you're right though that the feeling of alienation in Japan would be even more severe; they have a strong sense of identity vs. gaijin. I have the N1 now, which I didn't have when I was last there, so my chances of getting a job might be better. I think it would be cool to live there for a decade, visit other parts of Japan and Asia while there, and move back. But my wife who is Japanese told me if we move there again she's not moving back to America. She's tired from all the moving we've done over the years - like once every few years including internationally and within the US. I wouldn't want to be an English teacher there. I would like to proofread or translate if possible.

Yup thatís why I moved here. Maybe it would have been different if I grew up in an area like LA or something were thereís a lot of asians, but I grew up in the Midwest were besides my nuclear family I would see another Asian person maybe once every two weeks. My childhood was pretty good and I didnít get bullied too bad or anything but you deal with so much little bullshit everyday and you always know that youíre the other and subconsciously looked down upon. When I would spend time in japan to visit family as a young adult who understood the world and racial dynamics a little better than when I was a kid I was always likeĒ damn so this is what itís like being white in America ď

If you have n1 youíre probably golden. I think if youíre Asian esp Japanese and can speak near naturally and you have a native Japanese spouse by your side you will be fine life wise as well, although choosing to move to japan for good is a huge decision.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2020, 07:26:58 PM by dakara »

doyle

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Re: Japan
« Reply #43 on: February 26, 2020, 02:40:26 PM »
If you had a free week in Japan in the summer where would you spend it? I'll be in Tokyo before/after, so somewhere easily accessible by train would be ideal. I was thinking Kyoto or Osaka, any other suggestions?

Jive Turkey

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Re: Japan
« Reply #44 on: February 26, 2020, 07:16:53 PM »
If you had a free week in Japan in the summer where would you spend it? I'll be in Tokyo before/after, so somewhere easily accessible by train would be ideal. I was thinking Kyoto or Osaka, any other suggestions?
Kyoto and Kobe are both within an hour by train from Osaka (depending on where you are staying), so I'd recommend going there. Tons of spots and the people are cool. You'll get the most bang for your buck.

ChuckRamone

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Re: Japan
« Reply #45 on: February 26, 2020, 08:59:07 PM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
For Pals living in Japan, what's life there like these days? I've lived there before as an exchange student and once on a spouse visa. After my recent trip to Tokyo it made me consider living there again. However, I'm 40 now and the last time I lived there I couldn't find a permanent job, but that was during the 2008 recession and I also had less professional experience back then, so maybe it would be a little different this time.
[close]

There is a huge labor shortage, if you are Japanese you can find a job in a day no problem. Businesses are absolutely desperate for workers.

For foreigners, it is also easy to find a job if you can get your visa situation sorted. This heavily depends on what country you are a citizen of but assuming youíre America, having a college degree is basically mandatory to get that work visa if you arenít a student visa.  Easiest way is the classic English teacher route, almost any idiot with a worthless degree can get this job but it sucks, employers are very controlling, and itís a dead end job. If you have a degree and a skill/experience in IT, programming, corporate sales, finance, marketing you will find a decent job easily especially if you have a bit of Japanese language ability. Even if you just have some random degree, some Japanese language ability plus professional experience in a dead end office job you should be able to find something better than English teaching

I like living here,  but Iím a Japanese citizen and speak the language fluently. I think most foreigners can live here pretty easily, but I donít really recommend it long term because IMO itís impossible to really ďgetĒ Japanese people and culture unless you are raised Japanese and hav been speaking the language since childhood. Even foreigners with extremely good Japanese Iíve met never truly fit in, it just isnít possible. Youíll always be an alien in an foreign land.
[close]

I feel this way anyway in the US because I'm Asian. It's not as bad these days compared to in the 80s and 90s but growing up here sucked at times, and it left an impression on me. The younger generation of Asian Americans seem to have it a little better. I think you're right though that the feeling of alienation in Japan would be even more severe; they have a strong sense of identity vs. gaijin. I have the N1 now, which I didn't have when I was last there, so my chances of getting a job might be better. I think it would be cool to live there for a decade, visit other parts of Japan and Asia while there, and move back. But my wife who is Japanese told me if we move there again she's not moving back to America. She's tired from all the moving we've done over the years - like once every few years including internationally and within the US. I wouldn't want to be an English teacher there. I would like to proofread or translate if possible.
[close]

Yup thatís why I moved here. Maybe it would have been different if I grew up in an area like LA or something were thereís a lot of asians, but I grew up in the Midwest were besides my nuclear family I would see another Asian person maybe once every two weeks. My childhood was pretty good and I didnít get bullied too bad or anything but you deal with so much little bullshit everyday and you always know that youíre the other and subconsciously looked down upon. When I would spend time in japan to visit family as a young adult who understood the world and racial dynamics a little better than when I was a kid I was always likeĒ damn so this is what itís like being white in America ď

If you have n1 youíre probably golden. I think if youíre Asian esp Japanese and can speak near naturally and you have a native Japanese spouse by your side you will be fine life wise as well, although choosing to move to japan for good is a huge decision.

For me it was suburban Washington State. Things were different back then. I have some close friends I grew up with but small town people in Washington are pretty conservative - not like in Seattle. I'm Korean btw but I have no beef with Japanese people. But that's probably obvious since my wife is Japanese. I talked to her again about it and she sounds more open to the idea of living there a while and coming back later but we wouldn't leave for another year or two. Anyway, thanks for the replies everyone.

habby

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Re: Japan
« Reply #46 on: February 27, 2020, 03:26:49 AM »
checking komAzawa today and maybe yume farm in ******Chiba tomorrow. Anyone been to yume?

**** my phone autocorrected when I posted this haha

Komazawa was fun. Ended up making it out to Yume farm the next day and it was such a great time. Top 3 parks I've ever been to. Overall vibes were great and it was filled with so many random ass things to skate that you could probably spend 3 days there and not get bored. It was a bit of a mission to get out there but it is worth it. I'd recommend going by car rather than taking the train/bus. Next time we will be doing that for sure. It just felt great to skate a park covered in trees. Also they have bbqs and camp sites so the potential for a mid spring/early summer skate and camp trip would be so fun

dakara

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Re: Japan
« Reply #47 on: February 27, 2020, 05:33:49 AM »
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checking komAzawa today and maybe yume farm in ******Chiba tomorrow. Anyone been to yume?
[close]

**** my phone autocorrected when I posted this haha

Komazawa was fun. Ended up making it out to Yume farm the next day and it was such a great time. Top 3 parks I've ever been to. Overall vibes were great and it was filled with so many random ass things to skate that you could probably spend 3 days there and not get bored. It was a bit of a mission to get out there but it is worth it. I'd recommend going by car rather than taking the train/bus. Next time we will be doing that for sure. It just felt great to skate a park covered in trees. Also they have bbqs and camp sites so the potential for a mid spring/early summer skate and camp trip would be so fun

Damn a skate/camping trip sounds fun, might have to do that this summer.

Jive Turkey

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Re: Japan
« Reply #48 on: February 27, 2020, 11:11:36 PM »
Sounds dope. That would be a rad little gettaway

secondhandstoke

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Re: Japan
« Reply #49 on: March 01, 2020, 11:21:08 AM »
Sounds dope. That would be a rad little gettaway

one word - Coronavirus

Trickflip

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Re: Japan
« Reply #50 on: March 01, 2020, 11:27:23 AM »
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Sounds dope. That would be a rad little gettaway
[close]

one word - Coronavirus
two words - shut up

Damn a skate/camping trip sounds fun, might have to do that this summer.
Sounds like a fun time. I've been hoping to check out Japan over the summer as well
« Last Edit: March 01, 2020, 11:30:20 AM by Trickflip »



Gay Imp Sausage Metal

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Re: Japan
« Reply #51 on: March 02, 2020, 08:16:48 PM »
For Pals living in Japan, what's life there like these days? I've lived there before as an exchange student and once on a spouse visa. After my recent trip to Tokyo it made me consider living there again. However, I'm 40 now and the last time I lived there I couldn't find a permanent job, but that was during the 2008 recession and I also had less professional experience back then, so maybe it would be a little different this time.
being here in your 40s is quite different to being here in your 20s #duh ask me I should know.

having said that, I live in the countryside and have done so for the last 12 years so I'm probably not exactly in the know when it comes to living in the big cities. I still maintain that the best way to come here though is to get employed by a company in your own country that has connections with Japan and then get transferred here through them. Doing the whole English teaching thing is a good deal when you're young, dumb and have no responsibilities, but it barely pays the bills, nor is it sustainable unless you have some sort of qualifications that will land you a job teaching in universities.

I finally landed a nice job in intl. education after being in the industry for quite a while that is full-time with full benefits, but it took me a good minute and you better have better than mint Japanese because like skateboarding, lots of people these days are really good at Japanese so it's not like it was, or how I imagine it was, back in the 80s. On top of your Japanese you're also going to need some other skill that sets you apart from the rest of the pack otherwise you'll end up doing something you hate (English teaching, head hunting etc.). 

Damn a skate/camping trip sounds fun, might have to do that this summer.
you clearly haven't spent much time camping in a tent in the Japanese then have you :p
« Last Edit: March 03, 2020, 03:08:57 AM by Gay Imp Sausage Metal »

"This is untrue, my client has not been attacked in every country" #endlesstoecapsforthepuffyfooter

art hellman

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Re: Japan
« Reply #52 on: March 04, 2020, 02:20:16 PM »
I lived there for a year back in 2008 or so and had an apartment in Minato-ku directly across the street from that spot under the highway where there's that bridge pillar/hip that's featured in almost every Japanese skate video ever (and anytime Gonz skates there). 

similar to just about everyone else who has chimed in, I was always constantly moving when skating Tokyo and never really stayed anywhere longer than 5-10 minutes.  there were some night spots in Ginza alleys where I'd session some metal-grate-bank to metal-grate-curbs for what seemed like forever. 

is Hesh Dawgz still around?  I always liked that shop and there was some nearby shop that only sold Lakais and Crail products.  It's wild to think that anywhere in the world had an entire shoe wall of Lakais at some point in time.

next to Oslo, Tokyo was my all time favorite place to skate. 
hardly art, hardly starving


habby

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Re: Japan
« Reply #53 on: March 04, 2020, 09:15:41 PM »
I lived there for a year back in 2008 or so and had an apartment in Minato-ku directly across the street from that spot under the highway where there's that bridge pillar/hip that's featured in almost every Japanese skate video ever (and anytime Gonz skates there). 

similar to just about everyone else who has chimed in, I was always constantly moving when skating Tokyo and never really stayed anywhere longer than 5-10 minutes.  there were some night spots in Ginza alleys where I'd session some metal-grate-bank to metal-grate-curbs for what seemed like forever. 

is Hesh Dawgz still around?  I always liked that shop and there was some nearby shop that only sold Lakais and Crail products.  It's wild to think that anywhere in the world had an entire shoe wall of Lakais at some point in time.

next to Oslo, Tokyo was my all time favorite place to skate.

I haven't done much street skating in Tokyo. would love to get in a night session sometime soon

Hesh Dawgz is still kicking. bought my last board there and also picked up one of those Dear Skating Todd Congelliere Liberty reissue shirts there a while back. owner is a cool dude with good taste in skating

Gay Imp Sausage Metal

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Re: Japan
« Reply #54 on: March 05, 2020, 01:08:52 AM »
Hesh Dawgs is a great shop!

"This is untrue, my client has not been attacked in every country" #endlesstoecapsforthepuffyfooter

habby

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Re: Japan
« Reply #55 on: April 02, 2020, 06:27:46 PM »
fellow slappers living in Japan - How's everyone holding up? What is going on in your city? What are your thoughts on all this?

Some stuff here has started to shut down but not completely on lock down yet. Coming from America, it seems to kinda worry me with the low level of government intervention there's been here. Hard to gauge exactly what is going on but I have been staying home as much as I can.

haven't checked/heard from friends if my local parks have been closed lately but I have just resisted going. hopefully will skate a bit solo this weekend at night to keep my sanity.

but hope everyone is safe, healthy, and holding up well !
« Last Edit: April 02, 2020, 06:29:47 PM by habby »

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Re: Japan
« Reply #56 on: July 25, 2020, 11:50:43 PM »
Sorry for the bump, but I've been skating more recently (aside from the past 2 weeks due to the shitty weather) and just wanted to see what's up.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B-wcoULl3VY/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

^
I've been skating there a lot (https://goo.gl/maps/BzRX36A5UU1QeG2Z6) and it has been amazing, not much aside from flat ground and a sidewalk that can be used as a manny pad, but it's nice finally finding somewhere central Tokyo where you don't get kicked out for skating. Lot's of skateboarders here practicing flat ground at all times, at all levels of skating too which is nice.

Anyone know any other central spots in Tokyo like the one above? Somewhere you wont get kicked out regularly. I'm not a huge fan of parks, they are all kind of annoying to get to since I'm living near Ebisu (near Garden place). I used to skate the riverside of Asakusa and Ueno park when I lived out east, but that's far for a short skate session.

habby

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Re: Japan
« Reply #57 on: July 26, 2020, 04:55:19 AM »
nice, that spot looks cool. I am actually moving to Suginami in a few days ! I also need to find a spot close by me for an easy session as well...

In other news I think that Miyashita park in Shibuya will be open soon. Looks cool but I bet it'll be super packed all the time though

Jive Turkey

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Re: Japan
« Reply #58 on: July 26, 2020, 10:31:51 PM »
The rain is driving me insane. Any chance I have to skate it just pours or it's already totally wet.
I usually just bomb the hills from my place down to Yoyogihachiman and skate my local slappy spot alone.

The touchou area in west Shinjuku has got little spots that can be hit up on the weekend. Even some under cover areas.
https://goo.gl/maps/6C4PKuHPCydRsctM9

This part in Shinjuku Central Park always has people skating on the weekends. It's literally only flat ground (not even smooth) so I don't fuck with it but if that's your thing you can skate there hassle free.
https://goo.gl/maps/XcvE9YNiJbEzqrWj6


I don't know of anything around Garden Place. There is a bank spot along the Meguro river (west bank) near there and some places to skate in Daimon.
This whole office building area in Osaki has a bunch of spots. It's usually pretty chill at night and on weekends.
https://goo.gl/maps/XPUnuv2wSGgx21fD9


@habby where in Suginami are you moving to? I'm pretty close to Suginami (live in Hatagaya, Shibuya)

habby

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Re: Japan
« Reply #59 on: July 27, 2020, 07:25:53 PM »
yo @jive! nice spots, thanks for sharing. I will be on the hunt for a nice slappy curb to replace my current spot haha

Nice not too far from each other - I'll be living in Asagaya. Would be down to meet up for a session sometime !