Author Topic: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding  (Read 2838 times)

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rocklobster

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Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« on: January 08, 2024, 08:49:55 PM »
Stuff you realized that helped you get better:

1) 360 flips are more pressure and release than scoop and flip
When I started in the 2000s everyone told me they were like a Varial Flip with an additional shuvit, 75% shove + 25% flick was the conventional wisdom. I struggled with that trick forever and would only land the occasional one with perfect floors and loads of tic-tacs during the roll away.

Committed to learning them properly these last few months and realized that if you pressure the tail and heelside rail correctly the board naturally rotates and spins under you. After discovering that it was about making sure my head, hips and shoulders were in alignment over the board and jumping upwards instead of away from my board.

Makes sense why people say they are easier to learn than kickflips.

Edit: I think this logic works for Big Spins, they look like a Shove that is caught and rotated 180, but its the pressure and release that gives the elasticity to spin freely.

2) Maintain your forward momentum to hold your grinds and slides
For a long time I would brute force my tricks and ollie way higher than I needed to get onto a ledge. Probably explains my preference for tall ledges but also why I'd either slip out and stick on Tailslides.

Over the past year I've learned to control the height of my ollie and focus more on the front foot drag to get high and level. Instead of stomping the tail in high above the ledge I'm slotting my tail onto the ledge and thinking about maintaining a forward momentum.

That has given me better control while sliding and can choose if I want to exit regular or fakie.

3) Approaching the ledge / rail at a slight angle is usually better than fully parallel
Linked to #2 and especially so for slides you have to turn into the ledge / rail. Going at a slight angle gives the nose and tail time to gain height to get up and onto the obstacle.

I'd love to hear your insights (especially on getting a solid ollie) that helped you approach skateboarding differently.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2024, 06:56:34 AM by rocklobster »
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kook1234

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2024, 06:15:20 AM »
jump straight up when you pop.  this helps me stay over the board and move with it instead of chasing it

goodatmeth

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2024, 08:34:10 AM »
Here's a different one that changed everything for me.
Skateboarding is a million times easier when you're not super depressed. Your mental health can take all your skate skills away faster than you could ever imagine.
So care about yourself first instead of getting super frustrated when skating doesn't work either. Take a break.

JM

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2024, 11:31:32 AM »
For some reason this thread takes me back to internet 1.0 in the late 90’s where you’d get trick tips in forums and grainy gifs to illustrate.

Love it.

Anyways… I’m not naturally gifted, and have only gotten better through sheer brute force of trying over and over and over again.

Though, I think one thing that helped skating get easier was to just watch others that are good do their tricks. It’s amazing what little things you can pick up by watching someone else land the trick. (I couldn’t tell you all the minor, forgettable things I’ve picked up on)
Another brand new account coming in on some absolute fuck shit

Frank and Fred

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2024, 11:41:21 AM »
-Width to height ratio of my set up. As soon as I widened and lowered my rig, my skateboarding improved and felt way more satisfying. This was about 10 years ago. Turns out an 8.25" board with 58mm and tight 139s was not good for much beyond some Eastern Exposure 3 worship.

-don't force anything. if something isn't working out that day, move on, mess around until something starts clicking and then do it to death.

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2024, 12:53:19 PM »
Weight distribution on 360 flips,

once you get that down it unlocked so much fliptricks and even 360's for me. To focus on what comes before the pop, to really pressure the specific spots on your board, not just in a passive heavy foot but actively beyond (below/trough) the board.

Helped to lean back a bit more

rocklobster

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2024, 06:39:11 PM »
For some reason this thread takes me back to internet 1.0 in the late 90’s where you’d get trick tips in forums and grainy gifs to illustrate.

Love it.

Anyways… I’m not naturally gifted, and have only gotten better through sheer brute force of trying over and over and over again.

Though, I think one thing that helped skating get easier was to just watch others that are good do their tricks. It’s amazing what little things you can pick up by watching someone else land the trick. (I couldn’t tell you all the minor, forgettable things I’ve picked up on)

I did start my internet shitposting from Skateboard City way back, so this is a return to form for me.
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bob george

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2024, 08:17:32 PM »
I've said this numerous times in numerous threads; but actually using wax.

When/where I grew up it was like ILLEGAL to use wax, all the older dudes were just like "go faster" and would berate you with great homophobic scorn. I remember a friend buying a toy machine block of wax and the packaging basically said exactly what the older dudes we skated around said - "wax is unnecessary, just go faster"

Whilst I agree that you shouldn't skate slow and use wax, I don't understand what those guys were thinking...

How did they think people were grinding concrete etc? It really made younger me think that some skaters just had sort of magical sliding abilities with regards to all the bluntslides, long tailslides etc... then i realised there was kind of nothing to it. If you have the skill and confidence to get into the trick it's pretty chill.

My older brother (7 years older so different generations of skaters for sure) still trips right out if i wax something.

I'm certainly not a psycho with wax though, i'd much rather stick than slip out, and as i said earlier - skating super slow and using wax is not cool, but yeah, it's a legitimate skateboarding accessory - often a trick would be impossible without it, just use it as you need it.
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rocklobster

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2024, 10:43:54 PM »
I've said this numerous times in numerous threads; but actually using wax.

When/where I grew up it was like ILLEGAL to use wax, all the older dudes were just like "go faster" and would berate you with great homophobic scorn. I remember a friend buying a toy machine block of wax and the packaging basically said exactly what the older dudes we skated around said - "wax is unnecessary, just go faster"

Whilst I agree that you shouldn't skate slow and use wax, I don't understand what those guys were thinking...

How did they think people were grinding concrete etc? It really made younger me think that some skaters just had sort of magical sliding abilities with regards to all the bluntslides, long tailslides etc... then i realised there was kind of nothing to it. If you have the skill and confidence to get into the trick it's pretty chill.

My older brother (7 years older so different generations of skaters for sure) still trips right out if i wax something.

I'm certainly not a psycho with wax though, i'd much rather stick than slip out, and as i said earlier - skating super slow and using wax is not cool, but yeah, it's a legitimate skateboarding accessory - often a trick would be impossible without it, just use it as you need it.

It's just like salt in cooking - a little bit goes a long way

If anyone has insights that helped them get a proper ollie I'm all ears. I got a decent amount of flatground and ledge tricks but my regular ollies are the weakest part of my game. I struggle with the timing of the drag, lifting up my back foot, and leveling them out. 5 decks is the highest I've ever ollied which is disappointing for how long I've skated. Must be something I'm missing in my technique.
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Yakusoku2

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2024, 08:17:22 AM »
Weight distribution on 360 flips,

once you get that down it unlocked so much fliptricks and even 360's for me. To focus on what comes before the pop, to really pressure the specific spots on your board, not just in a passive heavy foot but actively beyond (below/trough) the board.

Helped to lean back a bit more

Could you explain this detailed or know where can I learn about this topic? I’m interested in weight distribution because its something I never paid attention during my skate teen years. Thank you!

rocklobster

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2024, 09:15:21 AM »
Expand Quote
Weight distribution on 360 flips,

once you get that down it unlocked so much fliptricks and even 360's for me. To focus on what comes before the pop, to really pressure the specific spots on your board, not just in a passive heavy foot but actively beyond (below/trough) the board.

Helped to lean back a bit more
[close]

Could you explain this detailed or know where can I learn about this topic? I’m interested in weight distribution because its something I never paid attention during my skate teen years. Thank you!

https://www.slapmagazine.com/index.php?topic=113601.0

This is a good place to start, specifically posts by @silhouette
Venture Truck Height:

5.0 & 5.2 LO
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FORGED - 1.85”- 46.99mm

5.0 ,5.2, 5.6, 5.8 & 6.1 HI
STANDARD - 2.09” - 53.09mm
FORGED - 2.04” - 51.82m

frontsideNECKTIE

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2024, 11:31:12 AM »
I had a bit of a paradigm shift in how I viewed skating.

My "coming of age" era was right at the end of the DVD era - Fully Flared, Mind Field, Stay Gold, etc... and these high level videos sort of ingrained me with the thought that skating is only worth doing if you're *that* good.

Thusly I would beat myself up over not being able to do (relatively) simple tricks. I was dedicated to being this cutty street skater even tho my high school years were in the boonies (with 2-3 spots worth a damn, a single terrible "park").

My mindset changed when I moved to a city with an early Grindline park. I realized I could get an adrenaline shot by doing roll-ins, going fast, and hitting frontside grinds. I progressed in that discipline much faster and gave me the stoke and confidence to be okay with not knowing every trick, but also being hungry to learn more.

At any rate, I'm still not very good at street haha!

Point is, have fun with comes easy. Sometimes the juice isn't worth the squeeze if it bums you out on skating.

Wow sorry, didn't realise I was dealing with a sick cunt here

Allen.

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2024, 05:52:41 PM »
Here's a different one that changed everything for me.
Skateboarding is a million times easier when you're not super depressed. Your mental health can take all your skate skills away faster than you could ever imagine.
So care about yourself first instead of getting super frustrated when skating doesn't work either. Take a break.

This explains a lot
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Urtripping

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2024, 07:07:38 PM »
I think the biggest one for me was already said, but it's worth repeating: moving on when something isn't clicking. The first time this hit me was when I landed a heelflip first try after spending 5, 10 mins fucking around with them for a few days in a row. Not killing myself or forming bad habits by trying them a million times per session, but just playing with different approaches until I started to flip em, then making adjustments to land them without pressuring myself to continue on after I really didn't feel like it. When i was younger, I was always really bad about getting into those states where you're doomed to repeat the same motion attempting a trick and wondering why it won't work. I'd try something until my legs couldn't and my mind was way too far gone. Turns out, that's not a great approach to learning lol.

Now, when I'm trying something new or trying something on a challenging spot and it starts to get frustrating or slip, I at least take a short break, but often just move on entirely before coming back to it another time. Unless I'm on a trip with friends or something, I can always wait to try it with fresh legs and a better mindset. Most of the time I end up getting it, and it saves my session every time.
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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2024, 10:05:24 PM »
This is taking it really back to basics, but for me, what I’m doing with my shoulders is everything. Square to the ledge on a 5050, opening them up for a bs noseslide, winding them up for 180s, etc etc. This next one is even more specific for me, but if a trick isn’t working, it’s probably because I’m not using my left shoulder (I’m goofy) and being lazy with my arm. I gotta lift that fucker in the air.

Hubba Bo-Tep

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2024, 01:52:07 AM »
Two epiphanies over the past 3 years...

There is more than one type of 'pop'.  There's the ankle-flick ollie 'pop', and there is the foot, tail and ground all make solid contact with each other at the same time 'pop'.  I discovered the latter when learning properly caught front shoves that rotate underneath you.  I never did understand @silhouette's tip for front shoves (pop straight down) until I started popping them like this.  Watch Tom Asta's front shove, his is text book 'foot, tail and ground making solid contact at the same time' pop.  This pop type opens up v heels, hard flips, impossibles and probably a fuck ton more rotational flip tricks.

The other seems patently obvious, but I have just properly internalised the fact that if your board lands behind you, you are leaning too far forward when you pop.  If it lands ahead of you, you are leaning too far back when you pop.  Etc etc... Basically, every action has an equal and opposite reaction, it's so simple it's stupid.

« Last Edit: January 11, 2024, 02:10:33 AM by Hubba Bo-Tep »

Yakusoku2

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2024, 04:17:57 PM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Weight distribution on 360 flips,

once you get that down it unlocked so much fliptricks and even 360's for me. To focus on what comes before the pop, to really pressure the specific spots on your board, not just in a passive heavy foot but actively beyond (below/trough) the board.

Helped to lean back a bit more
[close]

Could you explain this detailed or know where can I learn about this topic? I’m interested in weight distribution because its something I never paid attention during my skate teen years. Thank you!
[close]

https://www.slapmagazine.com/index.php?topic=113601.0

This is a good place to start, specifically posts by @silhouette

Thank you!! It’s time to learn properly. When I skated being young I never paid attention to those details like shoulder position, pressure points, weight distribution…

marcusbutler

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2024, 12:09:50 PM »
Changed how I do my flip tricks. I would flick down and never catch my shit. Let it hit the floor before I land on it. Friends would trash my kickflips off of our kicker because of that reason. I shrugged there comments off. I would think, why does it matter how I do my kickflip? I still landed a kickflip. It wasn't until going to a skatepark and trying a kickflip up a euro where I needed to change something. Moving my front foot from the middle of the board, to near the bolts. Changing my timing on the flick. Then discovering every flip trick works that way.
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rocklobster

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2024, 06:30:57 PM »
Changed how I do my flip tricks. I would flick down and never catch my shit. Let it hit the floor before I land on it. Friends would trash my kickflips off of our kicker because of that reason. I shrugged there comments off. I would think, why does it matter how I do my kickflip? I still landed a kickflip. It wasn't until going to a skatepark and trying a kickflip up a euro where I needed to change something. Moving my front foot from the middle of the board, to near the bolts. Changing my timing on the flick. Then discovering every flip trick works that way.

I used to karate kick my whole leg out for kickflips and could land them on flat, but nothing else. Then a friend corrected my approach: ollie first then flick your toe off the side. You don't even have to flick off very hard or exaggerated like Neen does for his heelflips, hitting the right spot off the nose does all the work.
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CossRooper

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2024, 11:48:07 PM »

-don't force anything. if something isn't working out that day, move on, mess around until something starts clicking and then do it to death.

damnnnnn deep down I know this is the correct way. I really wish I was better at this. I always get so fixated on the battle, and it's counterproductive

bartlaser

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2024, 08:21:56 AM »
Some tricks are easier to learn on a bank first.  I learned fs flips and fs bigspins on a bank before getting them on flat.

Its like training wheels.  You can cheat them a little bit on a bank if you find it hard to go full 180 at first.

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2024, 11:08:53 AM »
Two epiphanies over the past 3 years...

There is more than one type of 'pop'.  There's the ankle-flick ollie 'pop', and there is the foot, tail and ground all make solid contact with each other at the same time 'pop'.  I discovered the latter when learning properly caught front shoves that rotate underneath you.  I never did understand @silhouette's tip for front shoves (pop straight down) until I started popping them like this.  Watch Tom Asta's front shove, his is text book 'foot, tail and ground making solid contact at the same time' pop.  This pop type opens up v heels, hard flips, impossibles and probably a fuck ton more rotational flip tricks.

The other seems patently obvious, but I have just properly internalised the fact that if your board lands behind you, you are leaning too far forward when you pop.  If it lands ahead of you, you are leaning too far back when you pop.  Etc etc... Basically, every action has an equal and opposite reaction, it's so simple it's stupid.

damn i'm trying to learn how to keep front shoves under me more, can you expand on this or point me towards a clip that explains?

all the clips i see of front shoves is the pop foot and ankle flicking it towards the nose diagonally, not directly down like you are saying

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2024, 12:41:05 PM »
Something that clicked for me, especially when flipping into manny/slides/grinds was when approaching the ledge or rail just before i pop instead on focusing on the object to look down at my board. I had so much trouble with learning kickflip grinds and slides (other then KF front board) because i would try to spot where i was going to land on the ledge i would either not flick the board right or i would over, undershoot it. When i look at my board just before i pop i can see my board flipping and most of the time catch it right above the ledge and i wouldnt have to search for where i land in the grind. You really have to flip it and catch it on the way up and thats why looking at your feet on the board before you pop and flick helps so much. Its a little bit scarier but most of the time youll just stick until you can learn to lean back and let the board slide, or grind. This also has helped me a lot doing stuff off of stairs or gaps, i used to just focus on where im landing after i pop then look and try to catch my board but if im flipping the board looking down almost like doing the trick on flat ground before i pop makes it easier.

bob george

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2024, 09:15:17 PM »
Expand Quote
Two epiphanies over the past 3 years...

There is more than one type of 'pop'.  There's the ankle-flick ollie 'pop', and there is the foot, tail and ground all make solid contact with each other at the same time 'pop'.  I discovered the latter when learning properly caught front shoves that rotate underneath you.  I never did understand @silhouette's tip for front shoves (pop straight down) until I started popping them like this.  Watch Tom Asta's front shove, his is text book 'foot, tail and ground making solid contact at the same time' pop.  This pop type opens up v heels, hard flips, impossibles and probably a fuck ton more rotational flip tricks.

The other seems patently obvious, but I have just properly internalised the fact that if your board lands behind you, you are leaning too far forward when you pop.  If it lands ahead of you, you are leaning too far back when you pop.  Etc etc... Basically, every action has an equal and opposite reaction, it's so simple it's stupid.
[close]

damn i'm trying to learn how to keep front shoves under me more, can you expand on this or point me towards a clip that explains?

all the clips i see of front shoves is the pop foot and ankle flicking it towards the nose diagonally, not directly down like you are saying

you're still gonna do a little bit of the flick that it sounds like you're doing (i'm assuming that you CAN do front shuvs already but are trying to hone them) but the emphasis is on that straight down pop. Like think 90% straight down pop 10% flick/scoop/push/whatever you want to call the little nudge of the back foot. that's why it's such a snappy looking trick (when done well).
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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #24 on: January 19, 2024, 01:11:00 PM »
One morning I just woke up and realized im not hyped on a single clip ive ever got. Then I thought of the mike carroll quote and started putting a lot more effort into getting my tricks proper instead of just learning them and moving on. I felt like I was almost in denial and would tell myself certain things didnt matter that actually did with technique and all. That said im still not that hyped on any tricks ive ever done but looking back to even like a year ago there were so many things fundamentally wrong with my skating and the way I did tricks that I have made a conscious effort to fix and It has improved my skating a lot.

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2024, 04:00:20 PM »
Chronic knee pain - strengthening my glutes was a gamechanger.

Diet - Reducing sugar while increasing protein allowed me to skate longer with less soreness.

Mindset on "calling it" on trick battles - Realising when it's not going to happen, cutting my loses and coming back fresher.

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2024, 07:09:42 AM »
Expand Quote
Expand Quote
Two epiphanies over the past 3 years...

There is more than one type of 'pop'.  There's the ankle-flick ollie 'pop', and there is the foot, tail and ground all make solid contact with each other at the same time 'pop'.  I discovered the latter when learning properly caught front shoves that rotate underneath you.  I never did understand @silhouette's tip for front shoves (pop straight down) until I started popping them like this.  Watch Tom Asta's front shove, his is text book 'foot, tail and ground making solid contact at the same time' pop.  This pop type opens up v heels, hard flips, impossibles and probably a fuck ton more rotational flip tricks.

The other seems patently obvious, but I have just properly internalised the fact that if your board lands behind you, you are leaning too far forward when you pop.  If it lands ahead of you, you are leaning too far back when you pop.  Etc etc... Basically, every action has an equal and opposite reaction, it's so simple it's stupid.
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damn i'm trying to learn how to keep front shoves under me more, can you expand on this or point me towards a clip that explains?

all the clips i see of front shoves is the pop foot and ankle flicking it towards the nose diagonally, not directly down like you are saying
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you're still gonna do a little bit of the flick that it sounds like you're doing (i'm assuming that you CAN do front shuvs already but are trying to hone them) but the emphasis is on that straight down pop. Like think 90% straight down pop 10% flick/scoop/push/whatever you want to call the little nudge of the back foot. that's why it's such a snappy looking trick (when done well).

I'm tempted to say it's pop and rebound vs. pop and absorb, has all to do with which part of your tail smacks the ground first and for how long you insist. For high ollies and ollie based tricks like kickflips you want rebound that's as quick as possible, applying of the force should be instant/sudden and by the time your wheels have gotten off the ground you've already sucked both legs/knees up, that way you can use the elasticity of the momentum and verticality of the board to sort of kick and nudge that nose and level those back wheels earlier and thus higher. It's explosive pop that is based around the center of the tail and probably takes a certain way to look at a skateboard (the actual object and its shape) to completely figure out but should be relatable to most people who've ever tried high ollies (for them) and clipped their back wheels on the obstacle regardless of whether clearing it, that is not supposed to ever happen with the optimal form using that technique ideally.

Other type of pop is heavier and instead of getting the quickest pop and snap possible, you insist on driving downward force through your back leg for a little longer and consider more of the width of the tail, that's the type you want for pressure based tricks like ollie impossibles or backside 360 ollies, most people's pop shoves (both ways) are some kind of hybrid mix of both techniques because I guess only a few break skateboarding down like this, but understanding something doesn't make it less magical, I'm tempted to say to the contrary. Also explains why some people who're used to the swift quick pop sometimes struggle with 360 flips, whoever makes them work rebound style usually looks snappy and sick but most mortals really should consider insisting on the scoop/swipe for a little longer when first trying them. Find your sweet spot, lock it in then throw your whole leg into it, compensate with a slight kick through the front, ankle flicks and then holy shit (it never gets old).

tl;dr it's basically one-inch punch vs. full swing or uppercut. The pebble still terraces you anyway.

That people have been mentioning getting literal 'epiphanies' from my posts is so mindblowing it's almost embarrassing but I'm very very glad. My personal epiphany was to understand that you dictate whatever happens when you're skateboarding. Any given time. Whether you'll bail or make a trick, get or not get your clip, miss your flatground trick in the middle of your line, whatever is purely mental (once basic technique is dialed) which means you can control it. When failing to meet your supposed goal usually means you're just neglecting part of yourself, could be physical state (current levels of fatigue), could be mental state (there must be ways of desiring tricks, clips, whatever for toxic reasons), you know it's bad when/if you ever start wondering why you really do this anymore. Means the heart is not there and then if so why either force things against your own will or develop any identity complex over it, that just sounds like a mess and so no wonder why your sessions will suck if you don't even want to be skating whenever you do it. Even if footage happens, regardless of what you did any other human on the planet probably will be able to instantly read in it that your mindset that day was shit. Most of the battle really is subconscious and at the end of the day the one big reveal is that's been the entire challenge all along. That the straight 8's always were just a tool and coping mechanism because as a naive individual you once needed naive goals to grasp your potential and figure out who you are/aren't.

Then there's all the things it takes a bit of clarity and courage to realize we constantly deny to ourselves because they're considered shameful or wacky, e.g.. sometimes trying/bailing a trick is more fun than making it and we do not (always) battle it because we're insecure about it but because it's the process that we're after, looking/feeling like we're grinding against something when in reality, approached differently, more sincerely and casually the same maneuver very might as well happen first if not most every try but then would feel like it would kind of suck, because would demystify everything about it. I'm all for that though, I don't mind romanticizing skateboarding but might as well keep focus on the reality of it, if anything just to be thankful for the right things.

50mm

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #27 on: January 21, 2024, 12:11:43 PM »
Kick forward like karate for a kickflip. Kick forward and slide your foot of the heel side of the nose and say goodbye to your rocket flips.

behavioralguide

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #28 on: February 01, 2024, 02:17:57 AM »
What also helped me learning tricks: exaggeration. For example, if i try a backside flip i usually under rotate. I really have to picture Salabanzi doing one, the wind up, the wide armed rotation, the big kick. Works every time.

Just exaggerate all the minor movements you know you need to do

You can tone the movents down once you feel the trick more

MongoSwitchIsIllegal

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Re: Epiphanies that helped your skateboarding
« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2024, 01:08:13 PM »
Wheelbase is the most important measurement...
Wu Wei - The Art of Doing Nothing - Effortless Action