Author Topic: The Transition Help Thread  (Read 3412 times)

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cucktard

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #30 on: January 28, 2022, 05:01:15 AM »
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I feel like everyone else on this thread is more advanced than me but I wanted to ask how do transition skaters always know the right speed to have to get on the coping on different ramps and transitions? Iíve done a handful of BS slash grinds but they scare me as I have no feel as to what specific speed and pump force I need to reach the coping without going over, and I always feel like Iím going to go over the coping and hang up my back truck on the way down from the slash, which keeps me from pump harderÖ
[close]

Itís a touch faster than rock to fakie speed.
Like others said, you have to be comfortable and familiar with coping.

One thing I need to learn at 46 now that all the 8-year old kids at my local can do it is bs pivot to fakie.

Iíve heard this is easier on narrow trucks, snd I usually ride 9-inch trucks.

I also get that itís a heel-toe movement, but I have a tough time getting into the Ďcounter rotatedí position on the coping (lower body in line with coping, upper body perpendicular)

Any hints?
[close]


I did a pivot to fakie on one of those Krooked Beemer boards, haha.


Can you feeble to fakie? Because that's much the gateway trick to pivot-fakies. The common error I see with a lot of folks trying either trick is they get really on top of the coping or just slash it with no board control, and that makes it a lot harder to come back in without getting locked or hung up. The "heel-toe" motion is key because when you're locking your truck, you wanna pinch it heelside so that you're stalling successfully without just sitting on top. Bringing it back in fakie is obviously the scary part, but if you're comfortable enough navigating the ramp you'll be fine. Idk what you call it, but you know that motion when you're warming up on the ramp and you pump up straight, lift your truck without doing a rock, then just roll back in fakie? It kinda feels like that. Not as dramatic as doing a fakie manny back down, but it's like a trust fall.

Thank you.

I did a 50-50 stall to pivot-fakie once years ago, but feeble is a great idea. Keeps your body from being too far in top and too much inside the ramp.

Iíll give it a go

Have a gnar!
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pizzafliptofakie

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #31 on: January 28, 2022, 05:05:46 AM »
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I feel like everyone else on this thread is more advanced than me but I wanted to ask how do transition skaters always know the right speed to have to get on the coping on different ramps and transitions? Iíve done a handful of BS slash grinds but they scare me as I have no feel as to what specific speed and pump force I need to reach the coping without going over, and I always feel like Iím going to go over the coping and hang up my back truck on the way down from the slash, which keeps me from pump harderÖ
[close]

Itís a touch faster than rock to fakie speed.
Like others said, you have to be comfortable and familiar with coping.

One thing I need to learn at 46 now that all the 8-year old kids at my local can do it is bs pivot to fakie.

Iíve heard this is easier on narrow trucks, snd I usually ride 9-inch trucks.

I also get that itís a heel-toe movement, but I have a tough time getting into the Ďcounter rotatedí position on the coping (lower body in line with coping, upper body perpendicular)

Any hints?
[close]


I did a pivot to fakie on one of those Krooked Beemer boards, haha.


Can you feeble to fakie? Because that's much the gateway trick to pivot-fakies. The common error I see with a lot of folks trying either trick is they get really on top of the coping or just slash it with no board control, and that makes it a lot harder to come back in without getting locked or hung up. The "heel-toe" motion is key because when you're locking your truck, you wanna pinch it heelside so that you're stalling successfully without just sitting on top. Bringing it back in fakie is obviously the scary part, but if you're comfortable enough navigating the ramp you'll be fine. Idk what you call it, but you know that motion when you're warming up on the ramp and you pump up straight, lift your truck without doing a rock, then just roll back in fakie? It kinda feels like that. Not as dramatic as doing a fakie manny back down, but it's like a trust fall.
[close]

Thank you.

I did a 50-50 stall to pivot-fakie once years ago, but feeble is a great idea. Keeps your body from being too far in top and too much inside the ramp.

Iíll give it a go

Have a gnar!


If you did axle to fakie then you've definitely got this. The motions are quite similar even if it seems scarier.

typeischeap

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #32 on: January 28, 2022, 06:01:10 AM »
...those bs 5-0s that are angled toward the deck and just zip right along the coping while locked in on the heelside wheel.

Hell yeah, these are on my list for sure. Look so fun...

Great thread. Thanks for the Dan Drehobl reminder too.
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Mbrimson88

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2022, 08:16:12 PM »
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I feel like everyone else on this thread is more advanced than me but I wanted to ask how do transition skaters always know the right speed to have to get on the coping on different ramps and transitions? Iíve done a handful of BS slash grinds but they scare me as I have no feel as to what specific speed and pump force I need to reach the coping without going over, and I always feel like Iím going to go over the coping and hang up my back truck on the way down from the slash, which keeps me from pump harderÖ
[close]

Itís a touch faster than rock to fakie speed.
Like others said, you have to be comfortable and familiar with coping.

One thing I need to learn at 46 now that all the 8-year old kids at my local can do it is bs pivot to fakie.

Iíve heard this is easier on narrow trucks, snd I usually ride 9-inch trucks.

I also get that itís a heel-toe movement, but I have a tough time getting into the Ďcounter rotatedí position on the coping (lower body in line with coping, upper body perpendicular)

Any hints?


Firstly I am not a "bragging" type of person, and the only reason I am posting this is to help you guys here, but I was so totally stoked on just getting that motion so cleanly on almost the smallest thing ever that I had to post it however many years ago that was, but I always refer to it to help people learn pivot to fakie type tricks, or anything you need to turn onto and turn back in to fakie, so pivot, fifty or even smith right back in, which some people just have so easily.

The irony is nowdays I am almost never balanced, so they never work how I need them to on normal ramps (and I just slide them in) but I still go to mellow banks and super mellow transitions, where there is no chance of hanging up even if the front wheels touch down first before clearing the edge and do them correctly, which anyone else can also learn too.

So this is what I would concentrate on doing, without even thinking about an edge or on coping, do them on a mellow bank or driveway or something that you can get the balance, so when you go up and turn 90 degrees, sit on your heel on the tail of the board, keeping all your weight over the back truck.  As you start to get used to this position, keep your shoulders straight in line with how you rolled up, so don't turn them to sit over your board, but also stay lower than you might usually be on a normal pivot of fifty stall.

As you go to take it back in, the weight should be more on your back toes but not totally pushed down as you don't want the tail to scrape on the way down, but it is that gentle motion that you can use to put the board back on the face, either totally in rock or partly in rock before you roll back down fakie.

When you start to get more balanced on top of it, you can hold the board up for longer (like a fakie manual for a second) to roll the board back down the face of whatever it is you are doing it on.  The stupid thing about this trick though is the more mellow the face, the harder it is to get it back in as you have to hold it up for longer, but by learning it on something super mellow and easy to not hang up, you can get the hang of exactly where you need your shoulders, your feet, your board and all the rest.

Keeping all your weight over the back foot is key though.  As soon as your weight goes even slightly towards the middle or front foot, it is usually game over.

I can post some other clips of actually learning them on banks and things too, but I think you probably have enough info for now to get them going.  So many people I know have learned the balance on that small bank / quarter and then taken them to other taller things, one guy even taking them to the biggest ramp before the indoor park closed, which was awesome to see.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BqAEBsQhJig/

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Mbrimson88

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #34 on: January 29, 2022, 08:23:42 PM »
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...those bs 5-0s that are angled toward the deck and just zip right along the coping while locked in on the heelside wheel.
[close]

Hell yeah, these are on my list for sure. Look so fun...

Great thread. Thanks for the Dan Drehobl reminder too.


I am such a big fan of almost everything Dan Drehobl does, including the ability to skate anything - especially places that are just too tight or crazy for most people and still do things like pivot to fakies and other stuff on.


Keep thinking there was a Dan Drehobl thread with some good footage, but it might be somewhere that doesn't come up with the search option.

Krooked Kronicles was awesome, but any of his stuff is so good to watch.

I talk too much about skateboards.  Sorry.

danmasontree

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #35 on: February 14, 2022, 07:33:21 AM »
Why does my back foot come off any time I try and front disaster? Am I popping too late? Not going fast enough? I can fs 180 on flat and do little fs 180's on transitions, but as soon as i wanna try disaster everything turns to shit.

Mbrimson88

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #36 on: February 14, 2022, 05:40:57 PM »
Why does my back foot come off any time I try and front disaster? Am I popping too late? Not going fast enough? I can fs 180 on flat and do little fs 180's on transitions, but as soon as i wanna try disaster everything turns to shit.

My confidence is shot on bigger transition and I always end up doing that nowdays with frontside disasters, but maybe try them on really mellow tops of banks or smaller transition first, even come up more on an angle if needed.

The main thing is in the turn of your body too - roll up compressed with enough speed like you are going to roll out on the platform, depending on the ramp or your desire to get the board round vs getting a decent ollie, you can either just lift a little more as you turn or pop as high as you can, but turn shoulders then turn board and make sure the back foot gets around to where the board is, but not putting all your weight on your back leg, as you should be more over your front foot when you land.

One thing that can also help to lead up to doing disasters is to use the front foot to turn the board round to decker, like a half cab rock to fakie only the other way.  This in itself might take a bit of getting used to, but if you learn them on flat, then on bank edges, then on transition, then you have two tricks and more combos.

I can post a video of that process if needed too, but let me know if that all makes sense first.


The mellow small transition or even average top of a bank is always the best go to for many things like this, even something like a concrete edge to grass / other surface like a driveway to get the ollie round and the body landing how you need to on the lip of a ramp, which is different to how you would just do a 180 on flat.


I talk too much about skateboards.  Sorry.

l1ll1ll1

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #37 on: February 22, 2022, 08:18:04 AM »
Really boring stuff for most people here:
I can do tranny basics and I'm pretty comfortable skating small minis but for the love of god, I cant do tail stalls. Whenever I try to commit to put my weight on the coping, I'm shifting to early and whipe out. When I dont commit, its just a small embarassing tap with my tail on the coping. So my timing is probably way off... Any tipps?

cucktard

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #38 on: February 22, 2022, 02:19:28 PM »
Really boring stuff for most people here:
I can do tranny basics and I'm pretty comfortable skating small minis but for the love of god, I cant do tail stalls. Whenever I try to commit to put my weight on the coping, I'm shifting to early and whipe out. When I dont commit, its just a small embarassing tap with my tail on the coping. So my timing is probably way off... Any tipps?

Some people have trouble with getting on the deck because they imagine itís a more physical/aggressive movement than the little tail tap (where you just keep your body weight inside).

But itís not. You just need a touch more speed to carry your body weight up onto the coping. This extra speed can make your normal timing a bit off, but itís just a small adjustment.

If this is whatís happening to you, I suggest that as you come back in fakie from the far side of the ramp, just give a little bit more of a pump, do the same motion as before, no fast or big slam down on the coping. As you lock your back wheels against the coping, let the extra speed carry you up onto the deck.

Too much speed and your front foot will come off the board as you stand up on the deck. It thatís good practice for committing and getting the timing right.
Iím trying to be every momís favorite skaterí-&&

&& is no stranger to the female species. Hes always got some travel pussy with him in his slambulance. -Hateboard


Mbrimson88

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #39 on: February 23, 2022, 06:46:53 AM »
Really boring stuff for most people here:
I can do tranny basics and I'm pretty comfortable skating small minis but for the love of god, I cant do tail stalls. Whenever I try to commit to put my weight on the coping, I'm shifting to early and whipe out. When I dont commit, its just a small embarassing tap with my tail on the coping. So my timing is probably way off... Any tipps?


@cucktard Definitey has the info.


I was thinking I was going nuts as I thought I had posted something about this, but it turns out it was in another thread with similar interests here, which might be a good read as well for anyone:

Getting Comfortable on Mini-ramps

https://www.slapmagazine.com/index.php?topic=120011.msg3742056#msg3742056


The short bit of it that is relevant (and had someone doing full stand up tail stalls by the end of the session) as per info below.


The best example for learning basics is things like fakie tail taps, which can lead into and are almost the same as fakie tail stalls, but you can do them well below coping and you roll up with minimal speed and just tap the tail on the ramp at the moment you are about to stop, where ever that is on the ramp, keeping your weight over the front foot so you cannot slip out.  Work these up higher and higher, staying low until you are at the point where you can just tap the coping, which then gives you better balance to be able to pump a bit more and really put that tail down to stop and then drop back in.



To add to that, from today's session, the main thing I made sure was when the person was coming up they were staying low which helped to control the balance and not go over backwards when getting to the tail.  Sure it is easier for smaller bodies and kids learning, but as adults (especially taller or bigger ones) it is harder to get down lower and keep balanced, so by pumping pretty much so wheels just touch the coping on either side for a few goes and then get a light weight tap on the tail, then repeat a few pumps, tap tail, really helps with repetition for where you need to be.

Before legs get tired or things start to get uncomfortable, jump out for a bit or do something else, then get to about the same place again, pump up or drop in and slow down and get to tapping the tail more so than trying to get right up on it, but by pumping a little harder coming backwards, it is easier to get a more firm tap, then get up to stop on top in a tail stall.

If things go funny or stop working well, go back to the pumping just under or at coping and do some more taps to get back into the balance again.


The only other thing to say is the location can have a lot to do with it as well, eg a mini ramp with mellow transition and minimal to no coping might be harder to do it on than something a bit steeper or something with big coping, but on the bigger coping you want to make sure you are more balanced.


Almost forgot too, body position - in particular being completely side on, just with turned head rolling up and down is important too, not turning your body at all to the direction you are going in and definitely not keeping a slight forward stance when rolling backwards, cause that will throw off your balance more than anything.

Setting up a camera and watching this back often helps to see where you are at too.


I talk too much about skateboards.  Sorry.

l1ll1ll1

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #40 on: February 24, 2022, 12:55:17 AM »
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Really boring stuff for most people here:
I can do tranny basics and I'm pretty comfortable skating small minis but for the love of god, I cant do tail stalls. Whenever I try to commit to put my weight on the coping, I'm shifting to early and whipe out. When I dont commit, its just a small embarassing tap with my tail on the coping. So my timing is probably way off... Any tipps?
[close]

Some people have trouble with getting on the deck because they imagine itís a more physical/aggressive movement than the little tail tap (where you just keep your body weight inside).

But itís not. You just need a touch more speed to carry your body weight up onto the coping. This extra speed can make your normal timing a bit off, but itís just a small adjustment.

If this is whatís happening to you, I suggest that as you come back in fakie from the far side of the ramp, just give a little bit more of a pump, do the same motion as before, no fast or big slam down on the coping. As you lock your back wheels against the coping, let the extra speed carry you up onto the deck.

Too much speed and your front foot will come off the board as you stand up on the deck. It thatís good practice for committing and getting the timing right.

Sounds like it could totally help me, gonna let you know, thanks a ton!

Bror

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #41 on: March 09, 2022, 02:28:26 PM »
What is the general trick progression like on transition?

Ive got stuck practicing flatground most of last year and just remembered that it's transition I really want to skate. Don't really know how to progress tho.

Got 50 50s, BS slash and some pretty bad rock n rolls so far.

Also any tips on stance/posture would be really nice, feeling like bambi on ice at times

cucktard

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #42 on: March 09, 2022, 04:57:56 PM »
Good basics that help you get used to pivoting and coping are all sorts of 180 variations. For example, go ip fakie, and before you hit coping 180 into a rock to fakie. You can learn them both directions and both on the nose and tail.

Fs 50-50- are another good step. Fakie into a 50-50 stall as well.
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biaherl

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #43 on: March 13, 2022, 05:14:26 PM »
Also any tips on stance/posture would be really nice, feeling like bambi on ice at times

If you are old enough, skate your neighborhood, get comfortable skating down the street as much or more as you feel comfortable at the park. Point your shoulders the same direction as your nose and tail when you are not pushing, understand what putting your feet in the pocket means. Watch video's on how to push, it's never a bad thing to go back and relearn basics.

Find a safe route that is one mile from your house and push there and back. You can find this tool with a google search. Take someone with you even if they only jog it with you, they need the exercise too



Most importantly, only have fun and keep doing it

Now go back and skate transitoin and see how much easier it is. Snow boarding and down hilling helps too

CorneliusCardew

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #44 on: March 13, 2022, 07:51:03 PM »
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I feel like everyone else on this thread is more advanced than me but I wanted to ask how do transition skaters always know the right speed to have to get on the coping on different ramps and transitions? Iíve done a handful of BS slash grinds but they scare me as I have no feel as to what specific speed and pump force I need to reach the coping without going over, and I always feel like Iím going to go over the coping and hang up my back truck on the way down from the slash, which keeps me from pump harderÖ
[close]

Itís a touch faster than rock to fakie speed.
Like others said, you have to be comfortable and familiar with coping.

One thing I need to learn at 46 now that all the 8-year old kids at my local can do it is bs pivot to fakie.

Iíve heard this is easier on narrow trucks, snd I usually ride 9-inch trucks.

I also get that itís a heel-toe movement, but I have a tough time getting into the Ďcounter rotatedí position on the coping (lower body in line with coping, upper body perpendicular)

Any hints?

Learn feeble fakie first

Bror

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #45 on: March 14, 2022, 05:59:40 PM »
Expand Quote
Also any tips on stance/posture would be really nice, feeling like bambi on ice at times
[close]

If you are old enough, skate your neighborhood, get comfortable skating down the street as much or more as you feel comfortable at the park. Point your shoulders the same direction as your nose and tail when you are not pushing, understand what putting your feet in the pocket means. Watch video's on how to push, it's never a bad thing to go back and relearn basics.

Find a safe route that is one mile from your house and push there and back. You can find this tool with a google search. Take someone with you even if they only jog it with you, they need the exercise too



Most importantly, only have fun and keep doing it

Now go back and skate transitoin and see how much easier it is. Snow boarding and down hilling helps too

My biggest problem with my stace is always opening up my shoulders for my tricks. As a kid i mostly just cruised around, probably standing straight forward most of the time.

Now when I got back into skating again it's so hard to unlearn that, but gonna be mindful of having my shoulders locked with the bolts.

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #46 on: March 14, 2022, 08:06:10 PM »
Ordered a set of the 187 Pro pads after convincing myself I have to learn lien airs to justify the price tag. Been rocking soft G Forms under pants for a while since whacking the ever living fuck out my knee 5 months ago and it still being sensitive to touching the ground. Highly recommend those still but I'm over running out of bails and stepping back on the board or ganking an ankle.

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #47 on: April 25, 2022, 08:21:29 AM »
Ordered a set of the 187 Pro pads after convincing myself I have to learn lien airs to justify the price tag. Been rocking soft G Forms under pants for a while since whacking the ever living fuck out my knee 5 months ago and it still being sensitive to touching the ground. Highly recommend those still but I'm over running out of bails and stepping back on the board or ganking an ankle.

The beauty of knee pads is that, even after you've committed to landing a trick, if you notice something doesn't look or feel right, the option to bail to the knees is always present. Whereas padless, you've got a definitive point during the trick where you decide to commit, and if you notice something off after that, you're in for some bullshit.

Lean on the heels in the air for a lien.

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #48 on: May 08, 2022, 12:02:37 PM »
Any clips out there of a long FS rock n roll boardslide?

Frank and Fred

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Re: The Transition Help Thread
« Reply #49 on: May 08, 2022, 12:30:15 PM »